DON'T LECTURE ME

by Emily Hanford

Rethinking the Way College Students Learn

College students spend a lot of time listening to lectures. But research shows there are better ways to learn. And experts say students need to learn better because the 21st century economy demands more well-educated workers.

Lecturing was invented as a way to share information in a time before books were widely available. Now, there are better approaches.

The traditional college lecture has never been a good way to learn. This is the story of how some physics professors figured out the lecture wasn't working.

In the past 30 years, scientists have discovered a lot about how people learn. But traditional universities are slow to change their ways. So a group of educators in Minnesota decided to build a brand new college.

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REPORTER'S NOTEBOOK

Reporter Emily Hanford talks about where the idea for this project came from. More

UMR PHOTOS

The University of Minnesota Rochester is an experiment in teaching and learning. More

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Published Fall 2011

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The Tomorrow's College series is funded by a grant from Lumina Foundation, which is committed to enrolling and graduating more students from college, and by a grant from the Spencer Foundation, which is dedicated to the belief that research is necessary to the improvement of education.

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