American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

Back to The Data

Trips by*

Kelly Bulliner


Total cost of 7 trips: $13,845.84


Trips traveled under the office of Deborah Pryce

Destination: LAS VEGAS, NV
Sponsor: United States Telecom Association and state affiliates
Purpose: LEARNED ABOUT IMPORTANT POLICY AND REGULATORY ISSUES CONFRONTING THE TELECOM INDUSTRY. VISITED A CENTRAL OFFICE AND LEARNED ABOUT MARKET BASED COMPETITION AND DEREGULATION
Date: Oct 11, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $1,808.23
source

Destination: DALLAS
Sponsor: BURLINGTON NORTHERN SANTA FE CORP., ASHLAND INC., DEAN FOODS CO., FLOWSERVE CORP., YELLOW ROADWAY TRANSPORTATION, EXCEL
Purpose: THIS 3 DAY FORUM ALLOWED ME TO SEE FIRST-HAND THE INNER WORKINGS OF MANUFACTURING AND THE TRANSPORTATION OF MANUFACTURED GOODS. A SERIES OF COMPANY VISITS AND OTHER ACTIVITIES HELPED ILLUSTRATE THE IMPACT OF THE MANUFACTURING COMMUNITY ON THE AMERICAN ECO
Date: Feb 18, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $1,534.50
source

Destination: LOS ANGELES
Sponsor: Clear Channel Communications Inc
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL STAFF MEDIA CONFERENCE TO DISCUSS MASS MEDIA ISSUES, FEE MEDIA OWNERSHIP RULES, AND THE EFFECTS OF PUBLIC POLICY ON RADIO, TELEVISION, OUTDOOR ADVERTISING & LIVE ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRIES
Date: May 25, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $2,360.86
source

Destination: PORTLAND, ME
Sponsor: National Cable and Telecommunications Association and affiliated cable organizations
Purpose: MEET WITH CABLE INDUSTRY LEADERS TO DISCUSS VOIP, BROADBAND, AND DIGITAL TELEVISION TRANSITION ISSUES. PORTLAND, ME HAS ONE OF THE FEW VOIP SYSTEMS DEPLOYED NATIONALLY
Date: Aug 12, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $679.80
source

Destination: WASHINGTON, D.C.-WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS, WV
Sponsor: Congressional Institute Inc
Purpose: BICAMERAL CONGRESSIONAL RETREAT
Date: Jan 27, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $636.00
source

Destination: WASHINGTON, D.C.-BELGRADE, SERBIA-SKOPJE, MACEDONIA-PRISTINA, KOSOVO-PODGOVICA, MONTENEGRO-BELGRADE, SERBIN
Sponsor: German Marshall Fund of the United States
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL STUDY TOUR OF THE BALKANS TO EXPAND THE DIALOG BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND THE BALKANS. WE SAW FIRST-HAND THE LINGERING TERRITORIAL AND ETRIC TENSIONS, BUT ALSO SAW MANY OPPORTUNITIES FROM ALL SIDES FOR PROGRESS AND GROW
Date: Feb 19, 2005 (8 days)
Expense: $6,283.45
source

Destination: WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS, WV
Sponsor: Congressional Institute Inc
Purpose: BICAMERAL CHIEFS OF STAFF RETREAT
Date: Mar 3, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $543.00
source



* - Trips by all travelers named Kelly Bulliner.


American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.