American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

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    President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
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American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 11.17.14

    The Utility of a PhD

    Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
  • 11.12.14

    The Roosevelts as a political team

    Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: The Internet of the 1930s

    Some predicted radio would be a powerful force for democratizing information and spreading knowledge to a vast population previously separated by geography or income. But the new technology also raised anxieties.

Back to The Data

Trips by*

Danielle Brown


Total cost of 4 trips: $6,397.96


Trips traveled under the office of John Conyers

Destination: LAS VEGAS CONSUMER ELECTRONICS SHOW
Sponsor: Consumer Electronics Association
Purpose: TO ATTEND THE CONSUMER ELECTRONICS SHOW AND TO LEARN ABOUT LATEST DEVELOPMENTS IN TECHNOLOGY INDUSTRY
Date: Jan 8, 2003 (4 days)
Expense: $1,933.59
source

Destination: NEW YORK, NY AND NEW JERSEY
Sponsor: Healthcare Leadership Council
Purpose: FACT FINDING ON CHALLENGES AND DEVELOPMENTS IN THE HEALTH CARE INDUSTRY, INCLUDING LIABILITY REFORM AND PRIVACY ISSUES
Date: Feb 19, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $1,299.27
source

Destination: NEW YORK, NEW YORK
Sponsor: Microsoft Corporation
Purpose: FACT FINDING ON ISSUES OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND PRIVACY
Date: Oct 20, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $1,684.69
source

Destination: SEATTLE, WA
Sponsor: NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF MANUFACTURERS: WEYERHAUSER COMPANY, STOCKPOT/CAMPBELLS SOUP COMPANY, MICROSOFT, UST PUBLIC AFFAIRS, THE BOEING COMPANY, LONGVIEW FIBRE COMPANY
Purpose: TO SEE FIRST HAND THE INNER WORKINGS OF THE MANUFACTURING SECTOR. A SERIES OF COMPANY VISITS AND OTHER ACTIVITIES HELPED ILLUSTRATE THE IMPACT OF THE MANUFACTURING COMMUNITY ON THE AMERICAN ECONOMY AND WORKFORCE
Date: Jul 6, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $1,480.41
source



* - Trips by all travelers named Danielle Brown.


American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 11.17.14

    The Utility of a PhD

    Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
  • 11.12.14

    The Roosevelts as a political team

    Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: The Internet of the 1930s

    Some predicted radio would be a powerful force for democratizing information and spreading knowledge to a vast population previously separated by geography or income. But the new technology also raised anxieties.