American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

Back to The Data

Trips by*

Mischa Thompson


Total cost of 11 trips: $26,530.51


Trips traveled under the office of Gregory Meeks

Destination: CAIRO, EGYPT
Sponsor: American Chamber of Commerce in Egypt
Purpose: EDUCATING ON AMCHAM'S HISTORIC MISSION OF PROMOTING US-EGYPTIAN RELATIONS
Date: Jan 10, 2004 (7 days)
Expense: $2,845.50
source

Destination: SINGAPORE
Sponsor: no sponsor listed on form
Purpose: FACT-FINDING
Date: Apr 2, 2004 (7 days)
Expense: $6,409.26
source

Destination: RIO JANERIO, BRAZIL
Sponsor: Brazil-US Business Council
Purpose: FACT-FINDING
Date: Apr 11, 2004 (9 days)
Expense: $3,128.87
source

Destination: MIAMI
Sponsor: Inter-American Economic Council
Purpose: 2004 CONGRESSIONAL CARIBBEAN CAUCUS STAFF RETREAT
Date: Apr 30, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $1,702.15
source

Destination: COLOMBIA
Sponsor: US Office on Colombia
Purpose: THE FLIGHT OF THE AFRO-COLOMBIA COMMUNITIES & THE DISPLACEMENT OF THESE COMMUNITIES BY VIOLENCE IN COLOMBIA
Date: May 22, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $1,508.17
source

Destination: WARRENTON, VA
Sponsor: Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
Purpose: FORUM
Date: Jun 19, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $522.50
source

Destination: CARACAS, VENEZUELA
Sponsor: Georgetown University
Purpose: FACT FINDING
Date: Aug 1, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $1,061.60
source

Destination: MADRID, SPAIN-ALGERIA
Sponsor: Defense Forum Foundation
Purpose: FACT FINDING - TO VISIT THE REFUGEE CAMPS OF THE SAHUMI PEOPLE & SEE FIRST HAND THE SITUATION OF THE REFUGEES
Date: Aug 22, 2004 (8 days)
Expense: $1,684.81
source

Destination: NEW YORK
Sponsor: American Jewish Committee
Purpose: SPEAK ON US POLICY TOWARDS AFRICA
Date: Dec 7, 2004
Expense: $23.00
source

Destination: VIRGINIA-NJ-PUNTA CANA, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC-DULLES VIRGINIA
Sponsor: Chamber of Commerce for the USA
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL CONF. ON INTN. TRADE & INVESTMENT
Date: Feb 10, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $1,037.05
source

Destination: BRASILIA, BRAZIL
Sponsor: THE BRAZIL INFORMATION CENTER; TAM AIRLINES; PATRL GOV'T RELATIONS; BRAZILIAN STEEL INSTITUTE
Purpose: ESTABLISHING ON GOING CONGRESSIONAL DIALOGUE BETWEEN THE US & BRAZIL RELEVANT TO BILATERAL RELATIONS BETWEEN THE US & BRAZIL
Date: Feb 21, 2005 (4 days)
Expense: $6,607.60
source



* - Trips by all travelers named Mischa Thompson.


American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.