American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

Back to The Data

Trips by*

Mischa Thompson


Total cost of 11 trips: $26,530.51


Trips traveled under the office of Gregory Meeks

Destination: CAIRO, EGYPT
Sponsor: American Chamber of Commerce in Egypt
Purpose: EDUCATING ON AMCHAM'S HISTORIC MISSION OF PROMOTING US-EGYPTIAN RELATIONS
Date: Jan 10, 2004 (7 days)
Expense: $2,845.50
source

Destination: SINGAPORE
Sponsor: no sponsor listed on form
Purpose: FACT-FINDING
Date: Apr 2, 2004 (7 days)
Expense: $6,409.26
source

Destination: RIO JANERIO, BRAZIL
Sponsor: Brazil-US Business Council
Purpose: FACT-FINDING
Date: Apr 11, 2004 (9 days)
Expense: $3,128.87
source

Destination: MIAMI
Sponsor: Inter-American Economic Council
Purpose: 2004 CONGRESSIONAL CARIBBEAN CAUCUS STAFF RETREAT
Date: Apr 30, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $1,702.15
source

Destination: COLOMBIA
Sponsor: US Office on Colombia
Purpose: THE FLIGHT OF THE AFRO-COLOMBIA COMMUNITIES & THE DISPLACEMENT OF THESE COMMUNITIES BY VIOLENCE IN COLOMBIA
Date: May 22, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $1,508.17
source

Destination: WARRENTON, VA
Sponsor: Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
Purpose: FORUM
Date: Jun 19, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $522.50
source

Destination: CARACAS, VENEZUELA
Sponsor: Georgetown University
Purpose: FACT FINDING
Date: Aug 1, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $1,061.60
source

Destination: MADRID, SPAIN-ALGERIA
Sponsor: Defense Forum Foundation
Purpose: FACT FINDING - TO VISIT THE REFUGEE CAMPS OF THE SAHUMI PEOPLE & SEE FIRST HAND THE SITUATION OF THE REFUGEES
Date: Aug 22, 2004 (8 days)
Expense: $1,684.81
source

Destination: NEW YORK
Sponsor: American Jewish Committee
Purpose: SPEAK ON US POLICY TOWARDS AFRICA
Date: Dec 7, 2004
Expense: $23.00
source

Destination: VIRGINIA-NJ-PUNTA CANA, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC-DULLES VIRGINIA
Sponsor: Chamber of Commerce for the USA
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL CONF. ON INTN. TRADE & INVESTMENT
Date: Feb 10, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $1,037.05
source

Destination: BRASILIA, BRAZIL
Sponsor: THE BRAZIL INFORMATION CENTER; TAM AIRLINES; PATRL GOV'T RELATIONS; BRAZILIAN STEEL INSTITUTE
Purpose: ESTABLISHING ON GOING CONGRESSIONAL DIALOGUE BETWEEN THE US & BRAZIL RELEVANT TO BILATERAL RELATIONS BETWEEN THE US & BRAZIL
Date: Feb 21, 2005 (4 days)
Expense: $6,607.60
source



* - Trips by all travelers named Mischa Thompson.


American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.