American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.14

    Variation is key to deeper learning

    Humans obviously learn a lot of things through trial-and-error. A level of "desirable difficulty" built into a learning and exam process appears to boost the overall retention of new skills or knowledge.
  • 08.19.14

    Learning to love tests

    If there's consensus on anything in education, it's this: Tests are awful. But maybe we've been thinking about tests all wrong. Research shows that tests can actually be powerful tools for learning -- but only if teachers use them right.
  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.18.14

    This is your brain on language

    For decades psychologists cautioned against raising children bilingual. They warned parents and teachers that learning a second language as a child was bad for brain development. But recent studies have found exactly the opposite.

American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.14

    Variation is key to deeper learning

    Humans obviously learn a lot of things through trial-and-error. A level of "desirable difficulty" built into a learning and exam process appears to boost the overall retention of new skills or knowledge.
  • 08.19.14

    Learning to love tests

    If there's consensus on anything in education, it's this: Tests are awful. But maybe we've been thinking about tests all wrong. Research shows that tests can actually be powerful tools for learning -- but only if teachers use them right.
  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.18.14

    This is your brain on language

    For decades psychologists cautioned against raising children bilingual. They warned parents and teachers that learning a second language as a child was bad for brain development. But recent studies have found exactly the opposite.

Back to The Data

Trips by*

Dan Skopec


Total cost of 9 trips: $7,399.08


Trips traveled under the office of Dan Burton

Destination: TOUR OF HOOVER DAM, LADWP CONTROL WATER, POWER PLANT TOUR
Sponsor: Southern California Public Power Authority
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL
Date: May 31, 2001 (3 days)
Expense: $1,656.00
source

Destination: NEW YORK CITY
Sponsor: New York Mercantile Exchange
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL
Date: Jun 22, 2001
Expense: $415.00
source

Destination: GRAND JUNCTION, COLORADO
Sponsor: Colorado River Energy Distributors Association
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL
Date: Aug 12, 2001 (4 days)
Expense: $1,436.00
source

Destination: WILLIAMSBURG, VA
Sponsor: Mercatus Center at George Mason University
Purpose: CHIEF OF STAFF RETREAT
Date: Jan 24, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $382.00
source

Destination: CAMBRIDGE, MASS
Sponsor: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL SEMINAR ON ENERGY POLICY
Date: Apr 3, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $918.76
source


Trips traveled under the office of Thomas Davis

Destination: PHILADELPHIA, PA
Sponsor: Mercatus Center at George Mason University
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL
Date: Feb 21, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $320.00
source

Destination: NEW ORLEANS, LA
Sponsor: National Association of Convenience Stores
Purpose: TOUR OF OIL REFINER
Date: Apr 14, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $1,186.32
source


Trips traveled under the office of Doug Ose

Destination: NEW YORK CITY
Sponsor: CHASE - GOLDMAN SACKS - AMERICAN BANKING ASSOC.
Purpose: LEARN ABOUT COMMODITIES EXCHANGE ACT & DERIVATIVES
Date: Feb 7, 2000
Expense: $260.00
source

Destination: CALAVARES COUNTY & MURPHY, CALIFORNIA
Sponsor: Northern California Power Agency
Purpose: VIEW A FOREST SERVICE SLIDE THAT THREATENS ON NCPA DAM & POWER FACILITY
Date: Feb 1, 2002
Expense: $825.00
source



* - Trips by all travelers named Dan Skopec.


American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.14

    Variation is key to deeper learning

    Humans obviously learn a lot of things through trial-and-error. A level of "desirable difficulty" built into a learning and exam process appears to boost the overall retention of new skills or knowledge.
  • 08.19.14

    Learning to love tests

    If there's consensus on anything in education, it's this: Tests are awful. But maybe we've been thinking about tests all wrong. Research shows that tests can actually be powerful tools for learning -- but only if teachers use them right.
  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.18.14

    This is your brain on language

    For decades psychologists cautioned against raising children bilingual. They warned parents and teachers that learning a second language as a child was bad for brain development. But recent studies have found exactly the opposite.