American RadioWorks |
President Barack Obama delivers remarks at Henninger High School in Syracuse, New York, during the college affordability bus tour, Aug. 22, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)President Barack Obama delivers remarks at Henninger High School in Syracuse, New York, during the college affordability bus tour, Aug. 22, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)

Goodbye, College Ratings (For Now)

The Obama administration recently declared that it would no longer pursue a college ratings system based on accessibility, affordability and student success. And college presidents everywhere breathed a sigh of relief.

Recent Posts

  • 07.23.15

    Sweet Briar Returns

    Sweet Briar College was about to close after struggling with dwindling enrollment and other problems. An alumni group raised more than 20 million dollars in pledges to keep the doors open, but the school's survival is still deeply in doubt.
  • 07.15.15

    The Future of Historically Black Colleges

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities proliferated throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when many white schools refused to admit African Americans, especially in the South. Our guest this week feels HBCUs still serve a crucial role in higher education.
  • 07.07.15

    Talking About Race in Schools

    Over the past year, race relations have dominated the news cycle. This can bring up difficult questions, especially for parents and teachers. Our guest Yolanda Moses says Americans need to find more ways to talk about race in schools.
  • 07.02.15

    Minorities and Special Ed

    For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.

American RadioWorks |
President Barack Obama delivers remarks at Henninger High School in Syracuse, New York, during the college affordability bus tour, Aug. 22, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)President Barack Obama delivers remarks at Henninger High School in Syracuse, New York, during the college affordability bus tour, Aug. 22, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)

Goodbye, College Ratings (For Now)

The Obama administration recently declared that it would no longer pursue a college ratings system based on accessibility, affordability and student success. And college presidents everywhere breathed a sigh of relief.

Recent Posts

  • 07.23.15

    Sweet Briar Returns

    Sweet Briar College was about to close after struggling with dwindling enrollment and other problems. An alumni group raised more than 20 million dollars in pledges to keep the doors open, but the school's survival is still deeply in doubt.
  • 07.15.15

    The Future of Historically Black Colleges

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities proliferated throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when many white schools refused to admit African Americans, especially in the South. Our guest this week feels HBCUs still serve a crucial role in higher education.
  • 07.07.15

    Talking About Race in Schools

    Over the past year, race relations have dominated the news cycle. This can bring up difficult questions, especially for parents and teachers. Our guest Yolanda Moses says Americans need to find more ways to talk about race in schools.
  • 07.02.15

    Minorities and Special Ed

    For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.

Back to The Data

Trips by*

Marsha Shasteen


Total cost of 14 trips: $13,417.71


Trips traveled under the office of Sherwood Boehlert

Destination:
Sponsor: University of Texas
Purpose: EMPLOYEE TOURED VARIOUS RESEARCH FACILITIES ON THE UT CAMPUSES, AND WAS BRIEFED ON THE WORK BEING PERFORMED BY UNIVERSITY STAFF AND STUDENTS THROUGH GOVERNMENT SPONSORED GRANTS FROM THE NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION AND OTHER AGENCIES OVER WHICH THE SCIENCE
Date: Aug 3, 2001 (15 days)
Expense: $309.00
source


Trips traveled under the office of Bart Gordon

Destination: SAN DIEGO, CA
Sponsor: General Atomics
Purpose: I VISITED GENERAL ATOMICS' HEADQUARTERS TO BECOME FAMILIAR WITH THE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY INVOLVED IN SEVERAL PROGRAMS THAT I WILL ENCOUNTER IN MY WORK ON THE COMMITTEE. I TOURED FACILITIES AND RECEIVED BRIEFINGS ON PROGRAMS OF REVELANCE TO SCIENCE; ENER
Date: Jan 8, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $2,443.98
source

Destination: CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS
Sponsor: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Purpose: ATTENDED THE MIT 2004 SENIOR CONGRESSIONAL STAFF SEMINAR, "SOCIAL AND POLICY IMPLICATIONS OF ADVANCING HEALTH SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY"
Date: Apr 14, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $1,187.38
source

Destination: DENVER, COLORADO
Sponsor: University of Colorado
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN THE SECOND-ANNUAL CONGRESSIONAL STAFF FIELD TOUR. THE CONGRESSIONAL STAFF LOOKED FIRST-HAND AT WESTERN ENERGY ISSUES. I ALSO VISITED SEVERAL SITES OF INTEREST ON COLORADO'S FRONT RANGE
Date: Aug 3, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $952.44
source

Destination: BALTIMORE, MD
Sponsor: Council on Competitiveness
Purpose: TO ATTEND CONGRESSIONAL STAFF RETREAT SPONSORED BY THE COUNCIL ON COMPETITIVENESS, THE FORUM ON TECHNOLOGY & INNOVATION. FORUM TOPIC IS "AMERICA'S INNOVATION ECONOMY"
Date: Jan 13, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $395.00
source

Destination: SEATTLE, WA
Sponsor: Microsoft Corporation
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN CONGRESSIONAL TOUR AND BRIEFING. ISSUES COVERED INCLUDED SPYWARE, CONSUMER ISSUES, RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROMISES FOR BETTER PRIVACY PROTECTION AND A DEMONSTRATION OF THE NEXT WINDOWS VERSION
Date: Mar 3, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $1,938.00
source

Destination: BOSTON, MA
Sponsor: Alfred P Sloan Foundation
Purpose: TO ATTEND MIT'S 2005 SENIOR CONGRESSIONAL STAFF SEMINAR, "THE TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND INTERNET REVOLUTION, ITS POLICY AND ECONOMIC CONSEQUENCES"
Date: Mar 29, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $1,179.52
source


Trips traveled under the office of Ralph Hall

Destination: WOODS HOLE OCEANOGRAPHIC INSTITUTE (WHOI), WOODS HOLE MA
Sponsor: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Purpose: INSPECT WHOI RESEARCH FACILITIES & BE BRIEFED ON THEIR FEDERAL FUNDED RESEARCH
Date: May 30, 2001 (3 days)
Expense: $1,349.00
source

Destination: THE AIRLIE CENTER IN WARRENTON, VA
Sponsor: Harvard University
Purpose: TO ATTEND A COURSE FOR SENIOR CONGRESSIONAL STAFF ENTITLED: "GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE: THE SCIENCE AND HUMAN IMPACTS.
Date: Mar 24, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $460.00
source

Destination: MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY CAMPUS
Sponsor: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN THE MIT SEMINAR FOR SENIOR CONGRESSIONAL STAFF TO BE HELD ON MIT CAMPUS
Date: Apr 3, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $964.90
source

Destination: NEW YORK, NY
Sponsor: Better World Fund
Purpose: TO TOUR THE OFFICES OF THE UN AND TO BE BRIEFED ON CURRENT UN BUSINESS AS IT RELATES TO EDUCATION, SCIENTIFIC AND CULTURAL ISSUES, AS WELL AS THE UN ROLE IN OUR RESPONSE TO TERRORISM.
Date: Apr 26, 2002 (1 day)
Expense: $168.00
source

Destination: BALTIMORE, MARYLAND
Sponsor: Forum on Technology and Innovation
Purpose: TO ATTEND THE FORUM ON TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION FOR SENIOR CONGRESSIONAL STAFF. THE SUBJECT OF THE RETREAT WAS TECHNOLOGY AND HOMELAND SECURITY - IS AMERIACA MORE SECURE TODAY?
Date: Jan 16, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $375.00
source

Destination: NEW YORK, NY
Sponsor: Better World Fund
Purpose: TO ATTEND A CONGRESSIONAL STAFF TRIP TO THE UNITED NATIONS. THIS TRIP WILL CONTRIBUTE TO A DIALOGUE BETWEEN THE UN AND THE U.S. CONGRESS THAT IS ESSENTIAL FOR A STRONG U.S.-UN RELATIONSHIP
Date: May 16, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $165.00
source

Destination: YUCCA MOUNTAIN BY WAY OF LAS VEGAS, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH AND IDAHO FALLS, IDAHO
Sponsor: NUCLEAR ENERGY INSTITUTE AND INEEL IDAHO NUCLEAR ENGINEERING & ENVIRONMENTAL & ARGONNE-WEST NAT'L LAB.
Purpose: THE NEI ORGANIZED A TOUR & ON-SITE BRIEFING FOR CAPITOL HILLSTAFF & STAFF FROM ONE OF IT'S MEMBERS COMPANIES, BECHTEL CORP., OF YUCCA MT. PROJECT. AT INEEL & ARGONNE WEST WE RECEIVED AN ON-SITE BRIEFING & TOUR OF BOTH HISTORICAL & CURRENT NUCLEAR ENERGY T
Date: Aug 12, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $1,530.49
source



* - Trips by all travelers named Marsha Shasteen.


American RadioWorks |
President Barack Obama delivers remarks at Henninger High School in Syracuse, New York, during the college affordability bus tour, Aug. 22, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)President Barack Obama delivers remarks at Henninger High School in Syracuse, New York, during the college affordability bus tour, Aug. 22, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)

Goodbye, College Ratings (For Now)

The Obama administration recently declared that it would no longer pursue a college ratings system based on accessibility, affordability and student success. And college presidents everywhere breathed a sigh of relief.

Recent Posts

  • 07.23.15

    Sweet Briar Returns

    Sweet Briar College was about to close after struggling with dwindling enrollment and other problems. An alumni group raised more than 20 million dollars in pledges to keep the doors open, but the school's survival is still deeply in doubt.
  • 07.15.15

    The Future of Historically Black Colleges

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities proliferated throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when many white schools refused to admit African Americans, especially in the South. Our guest this week feels HBCUs still serve a crucial role in higher education.
  • 07.07.15

    Talking About Race in Schools

    Over the past year, race relations have dominated the news cycle. This can bring up difficult questions, especially for parents and teachers. Our guest Yolanda Moses says Americans need to find more ways to talk about race in schools.
  • 07.02.15

    Minorities and Special Ed

    For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.