American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

Recent Posts

  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.

American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

Recent Posts

  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.

Back to The Data

Trips by*

Kristen Sarri


Total cost of 13 trips: $7,006.03


Trips traveled under the office of Jack Reed

Destination: BOSTON, MA
Sponsor: Alfred P Sloan Foundation
Purpose: SENIOR CONGRESSIONAL STAFF SEMINAR ON "ENERGY: TECHNOLOGY AND POLICY CHANGES"
Date: Apr 3, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $886.60
source

Destination: CHICAGO, IL
Sponsor: American Planning Association
Purpose: GIVE SPEECH AT NATIONAL CONFERENCE
Date: Apr 13, 2002 (1 day)
Expense: $229.00
source

Destination: FORT LAUDERDALE, FL
Sponsor: NATIONAL LOW INCOME ENERGY CONSORTIUM
Purpose: TO SPEAK AT LOW-INCOME ENERGY ASSISTANCE CONFERENCE
Date: Jun 24, 2002 (1 day)
Expense: $389.50
source

Destination: PITTSBURGH, PA
Sponsor: Carnegie Mellon University
Purpose: VISIT TO CARNEGIE-MELLON UNIVERSITY TO MEET WITH FACULTY ON ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, UNFRASTRUCTURE AND MANUFACTURING ISSUES
Date: Jan 30, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $785.62
source

Destination: AUSTIN, TX
Sponsor: American Gas Association
Purpose: SPEAK AT LEGISLATIVE MEETING
Date: Apr 25, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $788.33
source

Destination: PROVIDENCE, RI
Sponsor: no sponsor listed on form
Purpose: VISIT ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS
Date: May 30, 2003
Expense: $170.50
source

Destination: SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO
Sponsor: American Gas Association
Purpose: SPEAKER AT CONFERENCE
Date: Apr 15, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $565.90
source

Destination: VALLEY FORGE, PA
Sponsor: PJM Interconnection LLC
Purpose: STAFF VISIT TO PJM TO LEARN ABOUT MID-ATLANTIC TRANSMISSION GRID
Date: May 24, 2004
Expense: $274.53
source

Destination: ST. LOUIS, MO
Sponsor: NATIONAL LOW INCOME ENERGY CONSORTIUM
Purpose: SPEAKER AT NATIONAL LOW INCOME ENERGY CONFERENCE
Date: Jun 7, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $405.90
source

Destination: PORT ISOBEL, MARYLAND
Sponsor: Chesapeake Bay Foundation
Purpose: STAFF TRIP TO LEARN ABOUT CHESAPEAKE BAY WATER QUALITY AND ECOSYSTEM
Date: Jun 28, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $250.00
source

Destination: EAST ST. LOUISE, MD
Sponsor: Peoples Energy Corporation
Purpose: SPEAKER AT PUBLIC DIALOGUE ON THE LOW-INCOME HOME ENERGY ASSISTANCE PROGRAM
Date: Dec 6, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $794.50
source

Destination: SAVANNAH, GA
Sponsor: American Gas Association
Purpose: SPEECH ON THE LOW-INCOME HOME ENERGY ASSISTANCE PROGRAM
Date: Mar 30, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $571.38
source

Destination: QUEBEC CITY, CANADA
Sponsor: NORTHEAST MIDWEST INSTITUTE
Purpose: TO GIVE A SPEECH ON THE NATIONAL AQUATIC INVASIVE SPECIES ACT TO U.S. AND CANADIAN MAYORS FROM THE GREAT LAKES AND ST. LAWRENCE SEAWAY AREA, AT THE CONFERENCE OF THE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF THE GREAT LAKES
Date: May 25, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $894.27
source



* - Trips by all travelers named Kristen Sarri.


American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

Recent Posts

  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.