American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.14

    Variation is key to deeper learning

    Humans obviously learn a lot of things through trial-and-error. A level of "desirable difficulty" built into a learning and exam process appears to boost the overall retention of new skills or knowledge.
  • 08.19.14

    Learning to love tests

    If there's consensus on anything in education, it's this: Tests are awful. But maybe we've been thinking about tests all wrong. Research shows that tests can actually be powerful tools for learning -- but only if teachers use them right.
  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.18.14

    This is your brain on language

    For decades psychologists cautioned against raising children bilingual. They warned parents and teachers that learning a second language as a child was bad for brain development. But recent studies have found exactly the opposite.

American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.14

    Variation is key to deeper learning

    Humans obviously learn a lot of things through trial-and-error. A level of "desirable difficulty" built into a learning and exam process appears to boost the overall retention of new skills or knowledge.
  • 08.19.14

    Learning to love tests

    If there's consensus on anything in education, it's this: Tests are awful. But maybe we've been thinking about tests all wrong. Research shows that tests can actually be powerful tools for learning -- but only if teachers use them right.
  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.18.14

    This is your brain on language

    For decades psychologists cautioned against raising children bilingual. They warned parents and teachers that learning a second language as a child was bad for brain development. But recent studies have found exactly the opposite.

Back to The Data

Trips by*

Kristen Sarri


Total cost of 13 trips: $7,006.03


Trips traveled under the office of Jack Reed

Destination: BOSTON, MA
Sponsor: Alfred P Sloan Foundation
Purpose: SENIOR CONGRESSIONAL STAFF SEMINAR ON "ENERGY: TECHNOLOGY AND POLICY CHANGES"
Date: Apr 3, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $886.60
source

Destination: CHICAGO, IL
Sponsor: American Planning Association
Purpose: GIVE SPEECH AT NATIONAL CONFERENCE
Date: Apr 13, 2002 (1 day)
Expense: $229.00
source

Destination: FORT LAUDERDALE, FL
Sponsor: NATIONAL LOW INCOME ENERGY CONSORTIUM
Purpose: TO SPEAK AT LOW-INCOME ENERGY ASSISTANCE CONFERENCE
Date: Jun 24, 2002 (1 day)
Expense: $389.50
source

Destination: PITTSBURGH, PA
Sponsor: Carnegie Mellon University
Purpose: VISIT TO CARNEGIE-MELLON UNIVERSITY TO MEET WITH FACULTY ON ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, UNFRASTRUCTURE AND MANUFACTURING ISSUES
Date: Jan 30, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $785.62
source

Destination: AUSTIN, TX
Sponsor: American Gas Association
Purpose: SPEAK AT LEGISLATIVE MEETING
Date: Apr 25, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $788.33
source

Destination: PROVIDENCE, RI
Sponsor: no sponsor listed on form
Purpose: VISIT ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS
Date: May 30, 2003
Expense: $170.50
source

Destination: SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO
Sponsor: American Gas Association
Purpose: SPEAKER AT CONFERENCE
Date: Apr 15, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $565.90
source

Destination: VALLEY FORGE, PA
Sponsor: PJM Interconnection LLC
Purpose: STAFF VISIT TO PJM TO LEARN ABOUT MID-ATLANTIC TRANSMISSION GRID
Date: May 24, 2004
Expense: $274.53
source

Destination: ST. LOUIS, MO
Sponsor: NATIONAL LOW INCOME ENERGY CONSORTIUM
Purpose: SPEAKER AT NATIONAL LOW INCOME ENERGY CONFERENCE
Date: Jun 7, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $405.90
source

Destination: PORT ISOBEL, MARYLAND
Sponsor: Chesapeake Bay Foundation
Purpose: STAFF TRIP TO LEARN ABOUT CHESAPEAKE BAY WATER QUALITY AND ECOSYSTEM
Date: Jun 28, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $250.00
source

Destination: EAST ST. LOUISE, MD
Sponsor: Peoples Energy Corporation
Purpose: SPEAKER AT PUBLIC DIALOGUE ON THE LOW-INCOME HOME ENERGY ASSISTANCE PROGRAM
Date: Dec 6, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $794.50
source

Destination: SAVANNAH, GA
Sponsor: American Gas Association
Purpose: SPEECH ON THE LOW-INCOME HOME ENERGY ASSISTANCE PROGRAM
Date: Mar 30, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $571.38
source

Destination: QUEBEC CITY, CANADA
Sponsor: NORTHEAST MIDWEST INSTITUTE
Purpose: TO GIVE A SPEECH ON THE NATIONAL AQUATIC INVASIVE SPECIES ACT TO U.S. AND CANADIAN MAYORS FROM THE GREAT LAKES AND ST. LAWRENCE SEAWAY AREA, AT THE CONFERENCE OF THE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF THE GREAT LAKES
Date: May 25, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $894.27
source



* - Trips by all travelers named Kristen Sarri.


American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.14

    Variation is key to deeper learning

    Humans obviously learn a lot of things through trial-and-error. A level of "desirable difficulty" built into a learning and exam process appears to boost the overall retention of new skills or knowledge.
  • 08.19.14

    Learning to love tests

    If there's consensus on anything in education, it's this: Tests are awful. But maybe we've been thinking about tests all wrong. Research shows that tests can actually be powerful tools for learning -- but only if teachers use them right.
  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.18.14

    This is your brain on language

    For decades psychologists cautioned against raising children bilingual. They warned parents and teachers that learning a second language as a child was bad for brain development. But recent studies have found exactly the opposite.