American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.14

    Variation is key to deeper learning

    Humans obviously learn a lot of things through trial-and-error. A level of "desirable difficulty" built into a learning and exam process appears to boost the overall retention of new skills or knowledge.
  • 08.19.14

    Learning to love tests

    If there's consensus on anything in education, it's this: Tests are awful. But maybe we've been thinking about tests all wrong. Research shows that tests can actually be powerful tools for learning -- but only if teachers use them right.
  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.18.14

    This is your brain on language

    For decades psychologists cautioned against raising children bilingual. They warned parents and teachers that learning a second language as a child was bad for brain development. But recent studies have found exactly the opposite.

American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.14

    Variation is key to deeper learning

    Humans obviously learn a lot of things through trial-and-error. A level of "desirable difficulty" built into a learning and exam process appears to boost the overall retention of new skills or knowledge.
  • 08.19.14

    Learning to love tests

    If there's consensus on anything in education, it's this: Tests are awful. But maybe we've been thinking about tests all wrong. Research shows that tests can actually be powerful tools for learning -- but only if teachers use them right.
  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.18.14

    This is your brain on language

    For decades psychologists cautioned against raising children bilingual. They warned parents and teachers that learning a second language as a child was bad for brain development. But recent studies have found exactly the opposite.

Back to The Data

Trips by*

Seth Bloom


Total cost of 14 trips: $18,968.35


Trips traveled under the office of Herbert Kohl

Destination: WINTERGREEN, VIRGINIA
Sponsor: CTIA-The Wireless Association
Purpose: FOR MY ANTITRUST COUNCIL, SETH BLOOM, TO ATTEND CTIA CONGRESSIONAL STAFF RETREAT IN WINTERGREEN, VIRGINIA
Date: Jan 13, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $220.00
source

Destination: NYC
Sponsor: National Cable and Telecommunications Association and affiliated cable organizations
Purpose: NCTA LEGISLATIVE BRIEFING
Date: Jun 22, 2000 (2 days)
Expense: $1,408.80
source

Destination: SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Sponsor: Congressional Economic Leadership Institute
Purpose: FOR SETH BLOOM TO ATTEND THE CELI STUDY DELEGATION ON TECHNOLOGY ISSUE IN SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Date: Nov 8, 2000 (4 days)
Expense: $1,780.00
source

Destination: COLORADO SPRINGS COLORADO
Sponsor: American Bar Association
Purpose: FAR SETH BLOOM TO ATTEND MEETING OF A.B.A. ANTITRUST SECTION AT WHICH HE WILL GIVE PRESENTATION REGARDING AGENDA OF ANTITRUST SUBCOMMITTEE
Date: Aug 8, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $1,135.84
source

Destination: CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
Sponsor: AMERICAN AIRLINE ORBITZ
Purpose: FACT FINDING TRIP TO INVESTIGATE ORBITZ AND DISCUSS AVIATION COMPETITION ISSUES
Date: May 30, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $879.00
source

Destination: NEW YORK, NY
Sponsor: National Cable and Telecommunications Association and affiliated cable organizations
Purpose: TO ATTEND CONGRESSIONAL STAFF FACT-FINDING TRIP TO EXAMINE ECONOMIC & COMPETITIVE ISSUES AFFECTING THE CABLE TELEVISION INDUSTRY
Date: Dec 5, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $1,818.86
source

Destination: SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO
Sponsor: American Bar Association
Purpose: FOR MY ANTITRUST COUNSEL, SETH BLOOM, TO ATTEND A.B.A. ANTITRUST SECTION MID-WINTER MEETING AND TO GIVE SPEECH ON ANTITRUST SUBCOMMITTEE AGENDA
Date: Jan 18, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $2,163.12
source

Destination: ORLANDO, FLORIDA
Sponsor: NCI
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT AT HEALTHCARE EXECUTIVE FORUM
Date: Jan 30, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $591.35
source

Destination: VANCOUVER, CANADA
Sponsor: American Bar Association
Purpose: ATTEND ANNUAL MEETING OF ADA ANTITRUST SECTION AND GIVE PRESENTATION ON ANTITRUST SUBCOMMITTEE AGENDA
Date: Aug 13, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $1,454.33
source

Destination: ORLANDO, FLORIDA
Sponsor: NCI
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT AT IDN SUMMIT CONFERENCE
Date: Sep 25, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $692.23
source

Destination: LOS ANGELES, CA
Sponsor: Time Warner
Purpose: FACT FINDING TRIP TO EXAMINE COMPETITION AND PIRACY ISSUES IN THE ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY
Date: Jan 15, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $1,375.89
source

Destination: NEW ORLEANS, LA
Sponsor: National Cable and Telecommunications Association and affiliated cable organizations
Purpose: FACT FINDING TRIP TO NCTA NATIONAL CONVENTION
Date: May 1, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $1,542.21
source

Destination: KONA, HI
Sponsor: American Bar Association
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT AT ABA ANTITRUST SECTION MIDWINTER MEETING
Date: Jan 7, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $1,932.00
source

Destination: SAN FRANCISCO, CA
Sponsor: National Cable and Telecommunications Association and affiliated cable organizations
Purpose: ATTENDANCE AT NCTA NATIONAL CONVENTION
Date: Apr 1, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $1,974.72
source



* - Trips by all travelers named Seth Bloom.


American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.14

    Variation is key to deeper learning

    Humans obviously learn a lot of things through trial-and-error. A level of "desirable difficulty" built into a learning and exam process appears to boost the overall retention of new skills or knowledge.
  • 08.19.14

    Learning to love tests

    If there's consensus on anything in education, it's this: Tests are awful. But maybe we've been thinking about tests all wrong. Research shows that tests can actually be powerful tools for learning -- but only if teachers use them right.
  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.18.14

    This is your brain on language

    For decades psychologists cautioned against raising children bilingual. They warned parents and teachers that learning a second language as a child was bad for brain development. But recent studies have found exactly the opposite.