American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.14

    Variation is key to deeper learning

    Humans obviously learn a lot of things through trial-and-error. A level of "desirable difficulty" built into a learning and exam process appears to boost the overall retention of new skills or knowledge.
  • 08.19.14

    Learning to love tests

    If there's consensus on anything in education, it's this: Tests are awful. But maybe we've been thinking about tests all wrong. Research shows that tests can actually be powerful tools for learning -- but only if teachers use them right.
  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.18.14

    This is your brain on language

    For decades psychologists cautioned against raising children bilingual. They warned parents and teachers that learning a second language as a child was bad for brain development. But recent studies have found exactly the opposite.

American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.14

    Variation is key to deeper learning

    Humans obviously learn a lot of things through trial-and-error. A level of "desirable difficulty" built into a learning and exam process appears to boost the overall retention of new skills or knowledge.
  • 08.19.14

    Learning to love tests

    If there's consensus on anything in education, it's this: Tests are awful. But maybe we've been thinking about tests all wrong. Research shows that tests can actually be powerful tools for learning -- but only if teachers use them right.
  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.18.14

    This is your brain on language

    For decades psychologists cautioned against raising children bilingual. They warned parents and teachers that learning a second language as a child was bad for brain development. But recent studies have found exactly the opposite.

Back to The Data

Trips by*

Amy Porter


Total cost of 16 trips: $16,517.84


Trips traveled under the office of Edward Royce

Destination: SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH
Sponsor: Freddie Mac
Purpose: TO ATTEND A BANKING AND TECHNOLOGY CONFERENCE
Date: Feb 17, 2000 (3 days)
Expense: $1,494.00
source

Destination:
Sponsor: Mortgage Insurance Companies of America
Purpose: TO ATTEND CONFERENCE ON PRIVATE MORTGAGE INSURANCE
Date: Apr 17, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $1,166.20
source

Destination:
Sponsor: Freddie Mac
Purpose: TO ATTEND SENATE FINANCIAL SERVICES CONFERENCE
Date: Feb 15, 2001 (3 days)
Expense: $1,050.00
source

Destination:
Sponsor: Council of Insurance Agents & Brokers
Purpose: ATTEND INSURANCE CONFERENCE
Date: Mar 3, 2001 (3 days)
Expense: $1,200.00
source

Destination:
Sponsor: NASDAQ
Purpose: TO LEARN ABOUT THE NASDAQ MARKET.
Date: Apr 19, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $875.00
source

Destination: NEW YORK, NEW YORK
Sponsor: Recording Industry Association of America
Purpose: TO EXAMINE U.S. COPYWRIGHT LAWS AND MUSIC RATING REQUIREMENTS
Date: Aug 13, 2001
Expense: $275.00
source

Destination:
Sponsor: Council of Federal Home Loan Banks
Purpose: TO ATTEND A CONFERENCE ON THE FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK SYSTEM
Date: Aug 30, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $744.04
source

Destination: WASHINGTON TO TUCSON, AZ TO LOS ANGELES CA
Sponsor: Community Financial Services Association of America
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN PANEL DISCUSSION.
Date: Jan 31, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $1,692.73
source

Destination: DC TO WEST VIRGINIA
Sponsor: Congressional Institute Inc
Purpose: CHIEF OF STAFF PLANNING RETREAT
Date: Feb 19, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $624.00
source

Destination: MEETING W/ AMERICAN ACADEMY OF LACTIRINES & NY ST. INSER. CAUCUS.
Sponsor: AMERICAN ACADEMY OF LACTIRINES
Purpose: LEARN ABOUT TERRORISM INSURANCE 2ND OPTIONAL FEDERAL CHARTER
Date: May 3, 2002 (1 day)
Expense: $935.00
source

Destination: HOTSPRINGS, VA
Sponsor: Congressional Institute Inc
Purpose: TO ATTEND THE BICAMERAL CHIEF OF STAFF DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE
Date: Oct 23, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $600.00
source

Destination: NYC, NY
Sponsor: NASDAQ
Purpose: TO STUDY MARKET STRUCTURE ISSUES
Date: Mar 29, 2004
Expense: $287.14
source

Destination: BRUSSELS, BELGIUM
Sponsor: Atlantic Commission
Purpose: TO GAIN A GREATER UNDERSTANDING OF THE GOVERNMENTAL AND POLITICAL PROCESSES IN EUROPE AS A WHOLE AND THE NETHERLANDS IN SPECIFIC, ESPECIALLY AS THEY RELATE TO U.S. FOREIGN POLICY.
Date: Apr 3, 2004 (8 days)
Expense: $3,261.17
source

Destination: NEW YORK, NEW YORK
Sponsor: New York Stock Exchange
Purpose: TO LEARN ABOUT AND OBSERVE THE OPERATIONS OF THE NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE.
Date: Jul 18, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $918.56
source

Destination: KOME, CHAD
Sponsor: Exxon Mobil Corporation
Purpose: TO OBSERVE THE ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL IMPACT ON THE CHAD-CAMEROON PIPELINE ON THE LOCAL COMMUNITY
Date: Jan 24, 2005
Expense: $500.00
source

Destination: ORLANDO, FLORIDA
Sponsor: NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF FEDERAL CREDIT UNIONS
Purpose: TO SPEAK TO THE CONVENTION ABOUT FINANCIAL SERVICES ISSUES
Date: Jan 27, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $895.00
source



* - Trips by all travelers named Amy Porter.


American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.14

    Variation is key to deeper learning

    Humans obviously learn a lot of things through trial-and-error. A level of "desirable difficulty" built into a learning and exam process appears to boost the overall retention of new skills or knowledge.
  • 08.19.14

    Learning to love tests

    If there's consensus on anything in education, it's this: Tests are awful. But maybe we've been thinking about tests all wrong. Research shows that tests can actually be powerful tools for learning -- but only if teachers use them right.
  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.18.14

    This is your brain on language

    For decades psychologists cautioned against raising children bilingual. They warned parents and teachers that learning a second language as a child was bad for brain development. But recent studies have found exactly the opposite.