American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.

Back to The Data

Trips by*

Margaret Peterlin


Total cost of 8 trips: $23,797.13


Trips traveled under the office of Richard Armey

Destination: TAIWAN (TAIPAI & SOUTHERN REGION)
Sponsor: Chinese National Association of Industry and Commerce
Purpose: ATTEND SEMINARS, EDUCATIONAL VISIT
Date: Aug 6, 2001 (7 days)
Expense: $4,570.00
source

Destination: MALAYSIA
Sponsor: US-Malaysia Exchange Association
Purpose: LEARN MORE ABOUT MALAYSIA'S PARTICIPATION IN WAR AGAINST TERRORISM
Date: Jan 14, 2002 (7 days)
Expense: $6,557.13
source

Destination: WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS, GREENBRIER
Sponsor: Congressional Institute Inc
Purpose: REPUBLICAN WORKING RETREAT
Date: Jan 30, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $660.00
source


Trips traveled under the office of J. Dennis Hastert

Destination: GREENBRIER, WV
Sponsor: Congressional Institute Inc
Purpose: REPUBLICAN PLANNING CONFERENCE
Date: Feb 6, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $1,094.00
source

Destination: MUMBAI, CHENNAI, DELHI
Sponsor: Confederation of Indian Industry
Purpose: MEET W/ MBRS OF INDIA'S GOVERNMENT & INDUSTRY
Date: Apr 14, 2003 (4 days)
Expense: $3,697.00
source

Destination: BRAZIL
Sponsor: Brazil-US Business Council
Purpose: MEET WITH MEMBERS OF BRAZIL'S CONGRESS AND GOVERNMENT MENISTERS TO DISCUSS TRADE & SECURITY ISSUES
Date: May 23, 2003 (8 days)
Expense: $5,799.00
source

Destination: PHILADELPHIA
Sponsor: Congressional Institute Inc
Purpose: ATTEND "CONGRESS OF TOMORROW"
Date: Jan 29, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $784.00
source

Destination: WHITE SULPHUR SPRING, WVA
Sponsor: Congressional Institute Inc
Purpose: BICAMERAL CONGRESSIONAL RETREAT
Date: Jan 27, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $636.00
source



* - Trips by all travelers named Margaret Peterlin.


American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.