American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

Back to The Data

Trips by*

Richard Perry


Total cost of 16 trips: $43,134.42


Trips traveled under the office of Lindsey Graham

Destination: CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA
Sponsor: Mercatus Center at George Mason University
Purpose: CONFERENCE TO STUDY HOW MARKET PROCESSES AFFECT POLICY DECISION IN THEENVIRONMENT, TAXES, LABOR REGULATIONS
Date: Jan 20, 2000 (2 days)
Expense: $454.00
source

Destination: MIAMI, FL - CUBA
Sponsor: Airline Brokers Co
Purpose: TO INVESTIGATE THE IMPACT OF THE FOREIGN ASSISTANCE ACT AND THE HELMS-BURTON ACT ON TRADE, HEALTH, TOURISM AND POLITICAL & RELIGIONS FREEDOM IN CUBA
Date: Apr 14, 2000 (3 days)
Expense: $887.00
source

Destination: REDMOND, WA, SEATTLE, WA
Sponsor: Microsoft Corporation
Purpose: LEARN FIRSTHAND ABOUT INTERNET PRIVACY, NEW WEB & SOFTWARE TECHNOLOGY, ETC
Date: Jul 6, 2000 (3 days)
Expense: $2,005.19
source

Destination: LITHUANIA - KANSAS - KLEIPEDA
Sponsor: Potomac Foundation
Purpose: VISIT W/ PRESIDENT, MINISTER OF DEFENSE, MINISTER OF STATE LITHUANIAN SPEAKER OF HOUSE, MEMBERS OF LITHUANIAN CONGRESS RE: NATO, TRADE AND EASTERN BLOC. SECURITY.
Date: Aug 18, 2000 (9 days)
Expense: $2,308.00
source

Destination: CHARLESTON, SC
Sponsor: EWA INFO & INFRA TECH. INC.
Purpose: VISIT SPAWAR - SPACE AND NAVAL WARFARE COMMAND SYSTEM CENTER AND SPECIFICALLY THE CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION CENTER (CIPC)
Date: Jul 7, 2003
Expense: $985.00
source

Destination: MAINE
Sponsor: Plum Creek Timber Company Inc
Purpose: OBSERVE SUSTAINABLE FOREST MANAGEMENT. MILL VISITS, LEARN ABOUT SELECT CUTTING, DESEASE, WOOD VARIETY FOREIGN TIMBER IMPORTS, TIMBER PROCESSING
Date: Aug 12, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $1,455.00
source

Destination: HOT SPRINGS, VA
Sponsor: Congressional Institute Inc
Purpose: BICAMERAL CHIEFS OF STAFF RETREAT
Date: Oct 23, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $1,454.00
source

Destination: INDIA
Sponsor: Confederation of Indian Industry
Purpose: FOCUS ON INDIA'S DEFENSE & FOREIGN POLICIES, MEET W/ SENIOR INDUSTRY REPS, TINK TANKS, OUTSOURCING
Date: Dec 8, 2003 (4 days)
Expense: $3,256.00
source

Destination: SACRAMENTO AND ST. HELENA, CALIFORNIA
Sponsor: Wachovia Bank
Purpose: HIGHER EDUCATION RE AUTHORIZATION CONFERENCE
Date: Jan 6, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $2,140.80
source

Destination: LAS VEGAS, NV
Sponsor: Consumer Electronics Association
Purpose: ATTEND ANNUAL CONSUMER ELECTRONICS SHOW, POLICY BRIEFINGS AND VISIT W/ S.C. COMPANIES EXHIBITING AT SHOW
Date: Jan 8, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $1,651.53
source

Destination: DAYTONA, FLA
Sponsor: International Speedway Corporation
Purpose: STUDY THE IMPACT OF FEDERAL TAX POLICY ON MOTOR SPORTS INFRASTRUCTURE
Date: Feb 6, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $821.90
source

Destination: NEW YORK, NEW YORK
Sponsor: American Association of Advertising Agencies
Purpose: IN-DEPTH BRIEFINGS ON IMPACT OF NEW DECENCY LEGISLATION IN CONGRESS ON ADVERTISING (TV & RADIO) AS WELL AS MINORITY MARKETING PRACTICES
Date: Mar 5, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $638.00
source

Destination: NY, NY
Sponsor: Congressional Institute Inc
Purpose: BICAMERAL CHIEFS OF STAFF RETREAT
Date: Mar 11, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $608.00
source

Destination: SINGAPORE
Sponsor: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies
Purpose: MEET W/ HIGH LEVEL OFFICIALS AT DEPT. OF HOMELAND SECURITY, DEPT. OF DEFENSE, FOREIGN MINISTRY RE: TRADE TERRORISM, MILITARY AND SECURITY ISSUES RE: U.S. SHIPS AND BUSINESS CLIMATE
Date: Apr 2, 2004 (6 days)
Expense: $7,256.00
source

Destination: TURKEY
Sponsor: American-Turkish Council
Purpose: DEFENSE-IT. STRIKE FIGHTER/INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY CONCERNS FOR SC COMPANIES/TEXTILE EXCHANGE WITH S.C. AND U.S. TEXTILE FIRMS
Date: Aug 13, 2004 (8 days)
Expense: $7,201.00
source

Destination: FRANCE
Sponsor: European Institute
Purpose: PARTICIPATE IN TRADE, SECURITY AND AVIATION MISSION INCLUDING MEETINGS W/ U.S. AMBASSADOR AND FRENCH FOREIGN MINISTER
Date: Dec 13, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $10,013.00
source



* - Trips by all travelers named Richard Perry.


American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.