American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.14

    Variation is key to deeper learning

    Humans obviously learn a lot of things through trial-and-error. A level of "desirable difficulty" built into a learning and exam process appears to boost the overall retention of new skills or knowledge.
  • 08.19.14

    Learning to love tests

    If there's consensus on anything in education, it's this: Tests are awful. But maybe we've been thinking about tests all wrong. Research shows that tests can actually be powerful tools for learning -- but only if teachers use them right.
  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.18.14

    This is your brain on language

    For decades psychologists cautioned against raising children bilingual. They warned parents and teachers that learning a second language as a child was bad for brain development. But recent studies have found exactly the opposite.

American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.14

    Variation is key to deeper learning

    Humans obviously learn a lot of things through trial-and-error. A level of "desirable difficulty" built into a learning and exam process appears to boost the overall retention of new skills or knowledge.
  • 08.19.14

    Learning to love tests

    If there's consensus on anything in education, it's this: Tests are awful. But maybe we've been thinking about tests all wrong. Research shows that tests can actually be powerful tools for learning -- but only if teachers use them right.
  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.18.14

    This is your brain on language

    For decades psychologists cautioned against raising children bilingual. They warned parents and teachers that learning a second language as a child was bad for brain development. But recent studies have found exactly the opposite.

Back to The Data

Trips by*

Steve Patterson


Total cost of 16 trips: $14,099.38


Trips traveled under the office of Jim Bunning

Destination: MIAMI, FLORIDA
Sponsor: Health and Life Organization
Purpose: SPEAK ON FINANCIAL MODERNIZATION PANEL AT HALO'S LEGISLATIVE CONFERENCE
Date: Dec 2, 1999 (3 days)
Expense: $1,704.00
source

Destination: NEW YORK, NEW YORK
Sponsor: National Association of Securities Dealers
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL, TO STUDY NASDAQ AND AMEX FACILITIES
Date: Jan 10, 2000
Expense: $282.00
source

Destination: SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA
Sponsor: Providian Financial Corporation
Purpose: U.S.A. PROVIDING FINANCIAL CORP'S HANDYWORKERS AND LOGIN ABOUT THE FINANCIAL SERVICES INDUSTRY
Date: Apr 19, 2001 (3 days)
Expense: $2,275.00
source

Destination: CENTRAL KENTUCKY
Sponsor: Council for Burley Tobacco and affiliates
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL TOUR TO STUDY KENTUCKY ASSOCIATION
Date: Aug 6, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $459.05
source

Destination: RICHMOND VIRGINIA
Sponsor: SWEDISH MATCH
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL VISIT SWEDISH MATEL USA FACILITIES
Date: Sep 7, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $338.52
source

Destination: HOUSTON TEXAS
Sponsor: El Paso Corporation
Purpose: TOUR EL PASO FACILITIES, STUDY OPERATION
Date: Jan 14, 2002 (1 day)
Expense: $2,151.00
source

Destination: NEW YORK, NEW YORK
Sponsor: NASDAQ
Purpose: TOUR NASDAQ FACILITIES STUDY OPERATIONS
Date: Jan 17, 2002 (1 day)
Expense: $865.11
source

Destination: BOSTON, MA
Sponsor: Fidelity Investments
Purpose: 2002 CONGRESSIONAL STAFF EDUCATION SERIES
Date: Jun 6, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $1,252.00
source

Destination: KENTUCKY
Sponsor: Council for Burley Tobacco and affiliates
Purpose: TO LEARN ABOUT KENTUCKY AGRICULTURE
Date: Aug 5, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $509.27
source

Destination: LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY
Sponsor: Kentucky Bankers Association
Purpose: MEET WITH KENTUCKY BANKERS AND ATTEND SEMINARS/CONVENTION
Date: Sep 7, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $261.66
source

Destination: COVINGTON, KENTUCKY
Sponsor: Fidelity Investments
Purpose: TO TOUR FIDELITY'S COVINGTON FACILITY
Date: Aug 13, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $297.58
source

Destination: CENTRAL KENTUCKY
Sponsor: Council for Burley Tobacco and affiliates
Purpose: TO LEARN ABOUT KENTUCKY'S AGRICULTURAL ECONOMY AND CULTURE
Date: Aug 2, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $598.48
source

Destination: COVINGTON, KENTUCKY
Sponsor: Kentucky Bankers Association
Purpose: ATTEND KENTUCKY BANKERS ASSOCIATION CONVENTION
Date: Sep 12, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $153.38
source

Destination: NEW YORK, NEW YORK
Sponsor: NASDAQ
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL TRIP. TO LEARN ABOUT PROPOSED SEC REGULATIONS AND THEIR POSSIBLE EFFECTS ON THE FINANCIAL SERVICES INDUSTRY
Date: Dec 9, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $1,016.67
source

Destination: NEW YORK, NEW YORK
Sponsor: Instinet Corporation
Purpose: TO LEARN ABOUT INSTINET'S BUSINESS PLANS AND OTHER ISSUES AFFECTING THE FINANCIAL MARKETS
Date: Apr 15, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $829.44
source

Destination: NEW YORK, NEW YORK
Sponsor: Securities Industry Association
Purpose: TO ATTEND THE SECURITIES INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION'S MARKET STRUCTURE CONFERENCE
Date: May 19, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $1,106.22
source



* - Trips by all travelers named Steve Patterson.


American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.14

    Variation is key to deeper learning

    Humans obviously learn a lot of things through trial-and-error. A level of "desirable difficulty" built into a learning and exam process appears to boost the overall retention of new skills or knowledge.
  • 08.19.14

    Learning to love tests

    If there's consensus on anything in education, it's this: Tests are awful. But maybe we've been thinking about tests all wrong. Research shows that tests can actually be powerful tools for learning -- but only if teachers use them right.
  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.18.14

    This is your brain on language

    For decades psychologists cautioned against raising children bilingual. They warned parents and teachers that learning a second language as a child was bad for brain development. But recent studies have found exactly the opposite.