American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

Back to The Data

Trips by*

Thad Bingel


Total cost of 8 trips: $8,895.77


Trips traveled under the office of Chris Cannon

Destination: WILLIAMSBURG, VA
Sponsor: Comptel/ASCENT
Purpose: BRIEFINGS & CONFERENCES ON THE COMPETITIVE TELECOMM INDUSTRY
Date: Apr 19, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $892.30
source

Destination: TECH POLICY 2002 LEGISLATIVE CONFERENCE, FARMINGTON PA
Sponsor: MULTIPLE CORPORATE SPONSORS CONFERENCE COORDINATED BY DUTKO GROUP
Purpose: CONFERENCE ON TECHNOLOGY AND TELECOMM LEGISLATION IN 107TH CONGRESS
Date: Feb 22, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $722.46
source


Trips traveled under the office of Dan Miller

Destination: NEW ORLEANS & TAFT, LOUISIANA
Sponsor: Entergy Corporation
Purpose: ENERGY RESTRUCTURING SEMINARS, NUCLEAR POWER PLANT SITE TOUR, ENTERGY HQ
Date: May 5, 2000 (2 days)
Expense: $933.85
source


Trips traveled under the office of F. James Sensenbrenner

Destination: WASHINGTON, DC, NEW YORK, NY
Sponsor: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY INDUSTRY COUNCIL (ITI) AND ITS MEMBER COMPANIES: EBAY AOL TIME WARNER, CISCO, IBM, APPLE COMPUTER, MICROSOFT
Purpose: BRIEFINGS AND SITE VISITS WITH ITIC AND HOST MEMBER COMPANIES IN THE TECHNOLOGY AND INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY INDUSTRIES
Date: Aug 5, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $1,524.00
source

Destination: NEMACOLIN, PA
Sponsor: DUTKO GROUP COORDINATED THE CONFERENCE, SPONSORING ENTITIES WERE: ALCATEL, AMAZON.COM, AT&T, LUCENT, ACT, EIA, INFINEON, LEVEL(3), MICROSOFT, NCTA, SBCA, SPRINT, ONTU, YAHOO!
Purpose: "ATTENDED TECH POLICY 2004" CONFERENCE ON PRESENT AND EMERGING TECHNOLOGY AND TELECOM ISSUES SERVED ON PANEL ON INTERNET TAXATION
Date: Mar 5, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $856.95
source

Destination: RICHMOND, VA
Sponsor: Comptel/ASCENT
Purpose: ATTENDED COMPTEL-ASCENT LEGISLATIVE CONFERENCE WITH SEVERAL SEMINARS/DISCUSSION SESSIONS ON TELECOM POLICY ISSUES FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF COMPETITIVE NON-INCUMBENT COMPANIES
Date: Apr 15, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $727.50
source

Destination: AUSTIN, TX
Sponsor: Information Technology Industry Council
Purpose: TOUR OF AUSTIN AREA TECHNOLOGY COMPANY FACILITIES AND EDUCATIONAL SEMINARS ON TECHNOLOGY POLICY
Date: May 25, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $1,880.00
source

Destination: LAS VEGAS, NV
Sponsor: Consumer Electronics Association
Purpose: ATTENDED LECTURES, DISCUSSION PANELS, AND PRODUCT DEMONSTRATIONS ON NEW CONSUMER TECHNOLOGIES AT THE 2005 CONSUMER ELECTRONICS SHOW (CES)
Date: Jan 5, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $1,358.71
source



* - Trips by all travelers named Thad Bingel.


American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.