American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.

Back to The Data

Trips by*

Ashley Musselman


Total cost of 8 trips: $13,127.19


Trips traveled under the office of Dan Lipinski

Destination: LOS ANGELES
Sponsor: Columbia College Chicago
Purpose: TO TOUR COLUMBIA COLLEGE CHICAGO'S L.A. PROGRAM AND MEET WITH PRODUCTION EXECS RE RUNAWAY PRODUCTION (THE LOSS OF U.S. PRODUCTION JOBS TO OVERSEAS)
Date: Feb 26, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $1,073.97
source

Destination: NEW ORLEANS, LA
Sponsor: Institute for Research on the Economics of Taxation
Purpose: ECONOMIC FACT-FINDING SEMINAR
Date: Apr 28, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $1,592.00
source


Trips traveled under the office of William Lipinski

Destination: TEMPE AND MESA, ARIZONA
Sponsor: American Gas Association
Purpose: TO LEARN ABOUT NATURAL GAS ACTIVITIES AND PIPELINE SAFETY OPERATIONS
Date: Apr 10, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $853.50
source

Destination: NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA
Sponsor: Institute for Research on the Economics of Taxation
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL STAFF COURSE ON ECONOMICS OF TAXATION AND TAX REFORM
Date: Oct 25, 2001 (3 days)
Expense: $1,482.60
source

Destination: BERLIN, GERMANY; FRANFURT (ODER), GERMANY; BRUSSELS, BELGIUM
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: TO LEARN ABOUT GERMAN POLITICS, GERMAN IMMIGRATION & ANTI-TERRORISM, BORDER & SECURITY, & TRANS-ATLANTIC RELATIONS
Date: Jan 19, 2002 (7 days)
Expense: $2,196.00
source

Destination: KANSAS CITY, MO TO CHICAGO
Sponsor: BNSF Railway Company
Purpose: FACT FINDING TRIP RE: FREIGHT RAIL OPERATIONS
Date: Mar 14, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $1,893.16
source

Destination: CHESTER & MANCHESTER, ENGLAND; CUMBRIA, ENGLAND, SELLAFIELD, AND LONDON, ENGLAND
Sponsor: Nuclear Energy Institute
Purpose: FACT-FINDING TRIP RE: NUCLEAR INDUSTRY IN GB AND SERVICES THEY CAN PROVIDE TO U.S VIEWING NUCLEAR TRANSPORT VESSELS
Date: Aug 24, 2003 (8 days)
Expense: $3,241.19
source

Destination: BOISE, ID-HELL'S CANYON, ID/OR
Sponsor: SAVE OUR WILD SALMON
Purpose: FACT FINDING TOUR OF THE SNAKE RIVER TO VIEW SPAWNING GROUNDS WHERE SALMON CAN BE RESTORED. LEARNED ABOUT FED 7 RECOVERY EFFORTS STUDIED SALMON LIFECYCLE & ECONOMIES DEPENDANT ON SALMON & STEELHEAD
Date: Aug 15, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $794.77
source



* - Trips by all travelers named Ashley Musselman.


American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.