American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
Students in Kentucky taking a Common Core math test. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Greater Expectations

The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there's plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning. Teachers say Common Core has the potential to help kids who are behind, as well as those who are ahead. But many teachers have big concerns about the Common Core tests. The new, tougher tests are meant to let the nation know how kids are really doing in school -- but bad scores could get teachers and principals fired.

Recent Posts

  • 08.29.14

    Greater Expectations transcript

  • 08.28.14

    A teacher loses faith in the Common Core

    New York teacher Kevin Glynn was once a big fan of the Common Core, but he says the standardized testing that's come along with it is reducing students to test scores and narrowing what gets taught in schools.
  • 08.28.14

    Are you smarter than a Common Core student? Try a Common Core test

    New Common Core tests are supposed to measure students' ability to think critically, analyze information, and cite evidence as well as test their conceptual understanding of mathematics and their ability to apply math to the real world. See how you'd do on a Common Core test.
  • 08.28.14

    Questioning the Common Core tests

    In the United States, education standards come with tests. Most students haven't been tested on the Common Core yet. But in one state where they have, the controversy is so intense that it's threatening to bring down the Common Core altogether.

American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
Students in Kentucky taking a Common Core math test. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Greater Expectations

The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there's plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning. Teachers say Common Core has the potential to help kids who are behind, as well as those who are ahead. But many teachers have big concerns about the Common Core tests. The new, tougher tests are meant to let the nation know how kids are really doing in school -- but bad scores could get teachers and principals fired.

Recent Posts

  • 08.29.14

    Greater Expectations transcript

  • 08.28.14

    A teacher loses faith in the Common Core

    New York teacher Kevin Glynn was once a big fan of the Common Core, but he says the standardized testing that's come along with it is reducing students to test scores and narrowing what gets taught in schools.
  • 08.28.14

    Are you smarter than a Common Core student? Try a Common Core test

    New Common Core tests are supposed to measure students' ability to think critically, analyze information, and cite evidence as well as test their conceptual understanding of mathematics and their ability to apply math to the real world. See how you'd do on a Common Core test.
  • 08.28.14

    Questioning the Common Core tests

    In the United States, education standards come with tests. Most students haven't been tested on the Common Core yet. But in one state where they have, the controversy is so intense that it's threatening to bring down the Common Core altogether.

Back to The Data

Trips by*

Karen Kimball


Total cost of 6 trips: $6,995.90


Trips traveled under the office of Sherwood Boehlert

Destination: SAN DIEGO, CA
Sponsor: General Atomics
Purpose: THE PURPOSE OF THE TRIP IS TO TOUR GENERAL ATOMICS HEADQUARTERS RESEARCH FACILITIES AND TO RECEIVE BRIEFINGS ON R&D PROGRAMS CONDUCTED BY GENERAL ATOMICS. THESE R&D ACTIVITIES INCLUDE: MAGNETIC AND INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSION; ADVANCED ACCELERATOR APPLICA
Date: Jan 11, 2001 (3 days)
Expense: $1,152.67
source

Destination: SUNOCO REFINERY, SOUTH PHILADELPHIA
Sponsor: NATIONAL PETROCHEMICAL & REFINERS ASSOCIATION
Purpose: TO VIEW A REFINERY OPERATION
Date: Jun 15, 2001
Expense: $106.50
source

Destination: URANCO COMPENHURST URANI ENRICHMENT PLANT; PART OF BORROW-PNTL NUCLEAR TRANSPORT; BNFL SELLAFIELD HLW PLANT; THORP REPROCESSING PLANT; AMIERS HQ
Sponsor: Nuclear Energy Institute
Purpose: SITE VISIT AND BRIEFINGS ON A COMMERCIAL NUCLEAR FACILITIES
Date: Aug 18, 2001 (14 days)
Expense: $3,875.75
source


Trips traveled under the office of F. James Sensenbrenner

Destination: YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA
Sponsor: Nuclear Energy Institute
Purpose: A TWO-DAY FACT FINDING TOUR OF THE PROPOSED SITE FOR THE DOE-MANAGED HIGH LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE REPOSITORY. THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN REPOSITORY IS BEING DESIGNED FOR FINAL HANDLING AND STORAGE OF HIGH LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE AND NUCLEAR FUEL FROM UNIVERSITY A
Date: Feb 21, 2000 (2 days)
Expense: $909.72
source

Destination: HERSHEY PENNSYLVANIA
Sponsor: Nuclear Energy Institute
Purpose: TO ATTEND THE NUCLEAR ENERGY INSTITUTE'S THIRD ANNUAL NEI GOVERNMENTALAFFAIRS WORKSHOP AND TO PARTICIPATE IN ONE OF THE CONGRESSIONAL PANELS, SPECIFICALLY THE FIRST PANEL DISCUSSION AT 8:00 A.M., SATURDAY MORNING TITLED "LEGISLATIVE PANEL ON COMPETITION A
Date: May 19, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $339.00
source

Destination: WOODS HOLE OCEANOGRAPHIC INSTITUTION (WHOI)
Sponsor: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Purpose: AN IN-DEPT TOUR OF THE WOODS HOLE OCEANOGRAPHIC INSTITUTION AND DETAILED DISCUSSIONS REGARDING CURRENT SCIENTIFIC INVESTIGATIONS INCLUDING MODELING TECHNIQUES, ASSESSMENTS OF RISKS, LIMITATIONS OF CURRENT SCIENCE, AREAS OF FURTHER STUDY.
Date: Aug 21, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $612.26
source



* - Trips by all travelers named Karen Kimball.


American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
Students in Kentucky taking a Common Core math test. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Greater Expectations

The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there's plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning. Teachers say Common Core has the potential to help kids who are behind, as well as those who are ahead. But many teachers have big concerns about the Common Core tests. The new, tougher tests are meant to let the nation know how kids are really doing in school -- but bad scores could get teachers and principals fired.

Recent Posts

  • 08.29.14

    Greater Expectations transcript

  • 08.28.14

    A teacher loses faith in the Common Core

    New York teacher Kevin Glynn was once a big fan of the Common Core, but he says the standardized testing that's come along with it is reducing students to test scores and narrowing what gets taught in schools.
  • 08.28.14

    Are you smarter than a Common Core student? Try a Common Core test

    New Common Core tests are supposed to measure students' ability to think critically, analyze information, and cite evidence as well as test their conceptual understanding of mathematics and their ability to apply math to the real world. See how you'd do on a Common Core test.
  • 08.28.14

    Questioning the Common Core tests

    In the United States, education standards come with tests. Most students haven't been tested on the Common Core yet. But in one state where they have, the controversy is so intense that it's threatening to bring down the Common Core altogether.