American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

Back to The Data

Trips by*

Philip Hays


Total cost of 10 trips: $18,126.93


Trips traveled under the office of Ron Lewis

Destination: NINE COUNTY TOUR OF KENTUCKY AGRICULTURE INTEREST
Sponsor: Council for Burley Tobacco and affiliates
Purpose: EDUCATE STAFF ON KENTUCKY AGRICULTURE ISSUES.
Date: Aug 7, 2000 (4 days)
Expense: $552.72
source

Destination: TRAVEL, MEDTRONICA ST. JUDE MEETINGS & VISITS, U OF MINN
Sponsor: MEDTRONIC, ST. JUDE, AND THE UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA
Purpose: MEDICAL DEVICE & MEDICARE, AND RESEARCH ISSUES
Date: Feb 21, 2001 (3 days)
Expense: $1,442.79
source

Destination: PHOENIX
Sponsor: Caremark Rx Inc
Purpose: SYMPOSIUM ON THE ROLE OF PHARMACY BENEFIT MANAGER'S IN MEDICARE & FEHBP
Date: Feb 20, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $3,582.50
source

Destination: PHILADELPHIA
Sponsor: Medco Health Solutions Inc
Purpose: TOUR AUTOMATED PHARMACY IN WILLINGBORO, NJ AND EDUCATION ON PBMS
Date: May 28, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $497.72
source

Destination: SCOTTSDALE, AZ
Sponsor: HEALTHCARE LEADERSHIP COUNCIL, ADVANCE PCS, MAYO FOUNDATION, MCKESSON CORP., AND CIGNA CORP.
Purpose: DISCUSS INNOVATIONS IN HEALTHCARE AND THE IMPACT OF THE MEDICARE REFORM BILL CONDUCT SHIFT VISITS TO HEALTHCARE SITES
Date: Feb 17, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $1,891.59
source

Destination: PHOENIX
Sponsor: Federated Ambulatory Surgery Association
Purpose: ATTEND ANNUAL MEETING OF FASA, CONDUCT SITE VISITS, AND ATTEND SESSIONS ON THE INDUSTRY.
Date: May 6, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $2,186.97
source

Destination: MINNEAPOLIS
Sponsor: ST. JUDE MEDICAL, MEDTRONIC, GUIDANT, MEDICAL ALLEY, UNIV. OF MINNESOTA
Purpose: ISSUES RELATING TO MEDICAL DEVICE INDUSTRY
Date: Aug 2, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $1,569.28
source

Destination: TAIWAN, ROC
Sponsor: Chinese International Economic Cooperation Association
Purpose: FACT-FINDING AND EDUCATIONAL VISIT
Date: Dec 8, 2004 (6 days)
Expense: $4,300.00
source

Destination: MIAMI, FL
Sponsor: Boston Scientific Corporation
Purpose: LEARN ABOUT LESS INVASIVE MEDICINE AND ADVANCES IN ENDOSURGICAL AND CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS, VISIT HOSPITALS TO VIEW SURGICAL PROCEEDURES
Date: Feb 24, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $1,800.00
source

Destination: LOUISVILLE, KY
Sponsor: KINDRED HEALTHCARE
Purpose: ACCOMPANY W&M STAFF TO VISIT HEALTHCARE FACILITIES AND ROUNDTABLE W/ CEO & SENIOR EXECUTIVES
Date: Aug 17, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $303.36
source



* - Trips by all travelers named Philip Hays.


American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.