American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

Back to The Data

Trips by*

Earnest Goule


Total cost of 11 trips: $11,959.46


Trips traveled under the office of Collin Peterson

Destination: WASHINGTON DC-CHICAGO, IL TRAVELED TO 6 FOOD PROCESSING PLANTS IN CHICAGO AREA
Sponsor: NFPA, ALTRIA, DEL MONTE, WORKA
Purpose: TO SEE AND LEARN ABOUT PROCESSED FOODS AND FOOD SAFETY
Date: Aug 19, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $1,096.00
source

Destination: FARGO. TOURED SUGAR BEET FARMS, PILLING STATIONS, AND SUGAR PROCESSING PLANTS
Sponsor: American Crystal Sugar Co
Purpose: TO LEARN ABOUT THE SUGAR BEET INDUSTRY FROM FIELD TO TABLE
Date: Sep 25, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $769.79
source

Destination: SAN DIEGO
Sponsor: Holstein Association USA
Purpose: FAIR ADVISORY BOARD IN REGARD TO THE NATION ANIMAL ID PROGRAM AND STATUS, WHERE TO GO FROM HERE AND LEGISLATIVE UPDATE
Date: Oct 9, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $1,081.24
source

Destination: NEW ORLEANS-THIBADAWY, LA
Sponsor: American Sugar Cane League
Purpose: TO LEARN ABOUT SUGAR CANE PRODUCTION, PROCESSING, MARKETING, TRADE AND DISTRIBUTION AND RAW SUGAR ALLOTMENTS
Date: Nov 14, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $833.50
source

Destination: DCA TO PUERTO RICO-PONCE, PUERTO RICO TO FT. LAUDERDALE
Sponsor: Biotechnology Industry Organization
Purpose: TO VISIT WINTER NURSERIES OF AG CHEM COMPANIES WHERE THEY DEVELOP PEST & DESIASE PESISTANT VARATIES AS WELL AS THE TROPICAL USDA RESEARCH CENTER
Date: Feb 15, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $1,220.90
source

Destination: FT. LAUDERDALE TO WEST PALM BEACH TO DCA
Sponsor: SUGAR CANE LEAGUE, FLORIDA, HAWAII, TEXAS
Purpose: TO LEARN ABOUT THE SUGAR INDUSTRY IN FLORIDA, PRODUCTION, PROCESSING AND DISTRIBUTION. AS WELL AS ENVIRONMMENTAL IMPACTS OF THE INDUSTRY
Date: Feb 18, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $896.48
source

Destination: TURIS, TUNISIA STAYED IN PARIS, FRANCE JULY 1-5 ON PERSONAL EXPENSE
Sponsor: NATIONAL DRY BEAN COUNCIL
Purpose: TO LEARN HOW THE WORLD FOOD AID PROGRAM OPERATES LEGISLATIVE IMPACTS AND THE FUNCTION OF THE PARTICIPATING COOPREATIVES
Date: Jun 26, 2004 (9 days)
Expense: $2,589.00
source

Destination: MIAMI
Sponsor: American Farm Bureau Federation and affiliates
Purpose: AGRICULTURE PORT INSPECTION, AIRPORT CUSTOMS FOR AGRICULTURAL GOODS, AND EVERGLADE CONSERVATION
Date: Aug 20, 2004 (6 days)
Expense: $976.88
source

Destination: MSP-BORSE, ID-DCA
Sponsor: American Sugar Alliance
Purpose: TO LEARN ABOUT THE DOMESTIC AND INTERNATIONAL ISSUES THAT AFFECT THE SWEETNER INDUSTRY
Date: Aug 7, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $1,309.00
source


Trips traveled under the office of John Tanner

Destination: LOUISVILLE, KY
Sponsor: Council for Burley Tobacco and affiliates
Purpose: EDUCATION ON BURLEY TOBACCO AND ECONOMIC IMPACT ON KY
Date: Aug 6, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $459.05
source

Destination: ST. PAUL TRAVEL TO LODGE
Sponsor: MINNESOTA CORN GROWERS
Purpose: TO LEARN THE BENEFITS OF ETHANOL AND OTHER USES OF CORN. FARM BILL DISCUSSIONS
Date: Aug 24, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $727.62
source



* - Trips by all travelers named Earnest Goule.


American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.