American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

Back to The Data

Trips by*

James Dennis


Total cost of 12 trips: $38,368.17


Trips traveled under the office of Jeff Bingaman

Destination: AVENTURA, FLORIDA
Sponsor: Securities Industry Association
Purpose: FACT FINDING
Date: Apr 19, 2001 (3 days)
Expense: $2,599.77
source

Destination: NEW YORK CITY
Sponsor: Bond Market Association
Purpose: FACT FINDING
Date: Jun 3, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $707.00
source

Destination: TAIWAN
Sponsor: Chinese National Association of Industry and Commerce
Purpose: FACT FINDING TRIP
Date: Aug 5, 2001 (7 days)
Expense: $3,956.00
source

Destination: NEW ORLEANS
Sponsor: El Paso Corporation
Purpose: FACT FINDING TRIP ON NATURAL GAS ISSUES INCLUDING DISCUSSIONS WITH TAX EXPERTS AND A VISIT TO AN OFF-SHORE GAS WELL
Date: Oct 19, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $1,835.08
source

Destination: NEW ORLEANS
Sponsor: American Bar Association
Purpose: PARTICIPATE IN SEVERAL PANELS DISCUSSING THE MATTERS RELATED TO LOW INCOME TAX PAYERS AND RETIREMENT POLICY
Date: Jan 19, 2002 (1 day)
Expense: $1,400.00
source

Destination: BOSTON, MA
Sponsor: Fidelity Investments
Purpose: FACT FINDING TRIP TO FIDELITY HEADQUARTERS. BRIEFINGS AND MEETINGS INCLUDED TOPICS SUCH AS CAPITAL MARKETS REVIEW, THE ROLE OF EMPLOYEE STOCK THE HEALTH OF THE DEFINED CONTRIBUTION WORLD AND INVESTMENT EDUCATION
Date: Jun 7, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $1,042.00
source

Destination: BERLIN, GENEVA, LONDON
Sponsor: no sponsor listed on form
Purpose: FACT FINDING TRIP TO AN INTERNATIONAL TAX MATTERS WITH REPRESENTATIVES OF GERMAN, SWISS AND BRITISH TREASURES AND OECP OFFICIAL
Date: May 23, 2003 (9 days)
Expense: $11,233.00
source

Destination: PALM BEACH, FLORIDA
Sponsor: Tax Council
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN SEVERAL PANEL DISCUSSIONS INVOLVING INTERNATIONAL, RETIREMENT AND ENERGY TAX MATTERS
Date: Mar 5, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $1,050.00
source

Destination: SONOMA, CALIFORNIA
Sponsor: Organization for International Investment
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN SEVERAL PANEL DISCUSSIONS INVOLVING INTERNATIONAL TAX MATTERS AND IN-SOURCING
Date: Apr 30, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $3,376.32
source

Destination: AMSTERDAM, BRUSSELS AND WARSAW
Sponsor: TAX FOUNDATION/OFII
Purpose: TO MEET WITH EU TAX AND TRADE OFFICIALS TO DISCUSS EU INTEGRATION AND TRADE AND TAX MATTERS INCLUDING FSC/ETI REPLACEMENT, "INSOURCING", EU POLICIES ON DIRECT INVESTMENT IN INDUSTRY AND GROWTH OF JOBS IN THE US
Date: May 23, 2004 (7 days)
Expense: $8,314.00
source

Destination: PORTLAND, OREGON AND SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Sponsor: Information Technology Industry Council
Purpose: TO VISIT HIGH TECHNOLOGY SITES AND MEET WITH TAX AND TRADE REPRESENTATIVES TO DISCUSS POLICIES INVOLVING THE GROWTH OF HIGH TECHNOLOGY INDUSTRIES AND CREATION OF JOBS IN THE UNITED STATES
Date: Jun 29, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $1,973.00
source

Destination: THE GREENBRIER
Sponsor: THE NATIONAL CHAMBER FOUNDATION AND THE AMERICAN BENEFITS INSTITUTE
Purpose: TO MEET WITH OTHER CONGRESSIONAL STAFF AND RETIREMENT POLICY EXPERTS TO DISCUSS CURRENT ISSUES INVOLVING RETIREMENT POLICY
Date: Jan 7, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $882.00
source



* - Trips by all travelers named James Dennis.


American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.