American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

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  • 11.10.14

    Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
  • 11.12.14

    The Roosevelts as a political team

    Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.
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    Some predicted radio would be a powerful force for democratizing information and spreading knowledge to a vast population previously separated by geography or income. But the new technology also raised anxieties.

American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 11.17.14

    The Utility of a PhD

    Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
  • 11.12.14

    The Roosevelts as a political team

    Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: The Internet of the 1930s

    Some predicted radio would be a powerful force for democratizing information and spreading knowledge to a vast population previously separated by geography or income. But the new technology also raised anxieties.

Back to The Data

Trips by*

Jason Cole


Total cost of 7 trips: $10,167.77


Trips traveled under the office of Dennis Moore

Destination: NEW YORK, NEW YORK
Sponsor: NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE/MERRILL LYNCH/HDI
Purpose: FACT FINDING AT MY STOCK EXCHANGE AND UNITED NATIONS
Date: Jan 23, 2000 (2 days)
Expense: $1,465.25
source

Destination: ST. PETERSBURG, FL
Sponsor: American Bankers Association
Purpose: PANELIST FOR ABA, ANNUAL LEGISLATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE CONFERENCE
Date: Feb 15, 2001 (3 days)
Expense: $1,733.67
source

Destination: NEW YORK, NY
Sponsor: Securities Industry Association
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL TRIP TO WALL STREET
Date: Apr 10, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $1,041.60
source

Destination: HOUSTON, TX
Sponsor: El Paso Corporation
Purpose: LEARN ABOUT CURRENT ISSUES CONCERNING ENERGY MEASURES
Date: Jan 14, 2002 (1 day)
Expense: $2,137.67
source

Destination: AVENTURA, FL
Sponsor: Securities Industry Association
Purpose: PARTICIPATION IN SIA'S GOV'T RELATIONS CONFERENCE
Date: Apr 17, 2002 (4 days)
Expense: $2,203.21
source

Destination: CRUM LYNE, PA
Sponsor: TransUnion Corporation
Purpose: CONFERENCE IN REAUTHORIZATION OF THE FAIR CREDIT REPORTING ART (FCRA)
Date: Feb 27, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $618.37
source

Destination: DENVER, CO
Sponsor: Topeka Federal Union Loan Bank
Purpose: STAFF SEMINAR AN ISSUES FINANCIAL SERVICES COMMITTEE
Date: May 28, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $968.00
source



* - Trips by all travelers named Jason Cole.


American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 11.17.14

    The Utility of a PhD

    Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
  • 11.12.14

    The Roosevelts as a political team

    Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: The Internet of the 1930s

    Some predicted radio would be a powerful force for democratizing information and spreading knowledge to a vast population previously separated by geography or income. But the new technology also raised anxieties.