American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.

Back to The Data

Trips by*

Kurt Christensen


Total cost of 6 trips: $10,672.13


Trips traveled under the office of Richard Pombo

Destination: AL-FL
Sponsor: no sponsor listed on form
Purpose: CLEAN COAL FIELD INSPECTION
Date: Apr 22, 2003 (5 days)
Expense: $1,372.85
source

Destination: MANASSAS
Sponsor: National Stone Sand & Gravel Association
Purpose: VISIT ROCK QUARRY AND GET BRIEFED ON THE ROLE OF AGGREGATES IN FEDERAL PUBLIC WORKS PROJECTS
Date: Jul 31, 2003
Expense: $71.97
source

Destination: LEXINGTON, KY
Sponsor: Farm Credit Council
Purpose: BRIEF MEMBERS AN PENDING LEGISLATION
Date: Sep 14, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $635.23
source

Destination: SAVANNAH, GA
Sponsor: Forest Landowners Association Inc
Purpose: SPEAK TO ORGANIZATION ABOUT RESOURCES ISSUES
Date: May 4, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $870.00
source


Trips traveled under the office of Dennis Rehberg

Destination: MADRID-ALGERIA
Sponsor: Defense Forum Foundation
Purpose: FACT FINDING OF WESTERN SAHARA ISSUE
Date: Apr 15, 2001 (7 days)
Expense: $1,315.00
source


Trips traveled under the office of Don Young

Destination: JUNEAU, ANCHORAGE, HEALY, FAIRBANKS & KOTZEBUE, ALASKA
Sponsor: NATIONAL MINING ASSOCIATION / GOLD INSTITUTE
Purpose: VISIT MINING OPERATIONS
Date: Jul 2, 2000 (6 days)
Expense: $6,407.08
source



* - Trips by all travelers named Kurt Christensen.


American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.