American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

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American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

Recent Posts

  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.

Back to The Data

Trips sponsored by

Washington Biotechnology & Biomedical Association


Total cost of 5 trips: $7,406.54


Traveler: Mickey Forrest (from the office of Lincoln Chafee)
Destination: SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Purpose: FOCUS ON MEDICARE LEGISLATION & ITS IMPACT ON SEATTLE-AREA BIOMEDICAL COMPANIES
Date: Aug 6, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $1,250.00
source

Traveler: Jesse Kerns (from the office of Jim Mcdermott)
Destination: SEATTLE, WA
Purpose: LEARN ABOUT BIOTECHNOLOGY
Date: Jun 25, 2004 (6 days)
Expense: $1,663.19
source

Traveler: Christal Sheppard (from the office of Bart Gordon)
Destination: SEATTLE
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN THE WASHINGTON BIOTECHNOLOGY & BIOMEDICAL ASSOCIATIONS AND THE BIOTECHNOLOGY INDUSTRY ORGANIZATION (BIO) EDUCATIONAL TOUR OF THE LIFE SCIENCES COMMUNITIES IN THE PUGET SOUND REGION. TITLED "GOOD SCIENCE GOOD BUSINESS." AND ATTENDED PRESE
Date: Jun 28, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $1,554.23
source

Traveler: Brian Peters (from the office of Jay Inslee)
Destination: SEATTLE, WA
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL
Date: Jun 28, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $1,405.45
source

Traveler: Emily Gibbons (from the office of Max Sandlin)
Destination: SEATTLE, WA
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL BIOTECHNOLOGY TOUR
Date: Jun 28, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $1,533.67
source



American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

Recent Posts

  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.