American RadioWorks |
Students in Kentucky taking a Common Core math test. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Greater Expectations

The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there's plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning. Teachers say Common Core has the potential to help kids who are behind, as well as those who are ahead. But many teachers have big concerns about the Common Core tests. The new, tougher tests are meant to let the nation know how kids are really doing in school -- but bad scores could get teachers and principals fired.

Recent Posts

  • 09.02.14

    Teachers embrace the Common Core

    Teachers in Reno, Nevada, were skeptical of the Common Core at first. But they have embraced the new standards as a way to bring better education to students who are struggling in school -- and to kids who are ahead.
  • 08.28.14

    A teacher loses faith in the Common Core

    New York teacher Kevin Glynn was once a big fan of the Common Core, but he says the standardized testing that's come along with it is reducing students to test scores and narrowing what gets taught in schools.
  • 08.28.14

    Are you smarter than a Common Core student? Try a Common Core test

    New Common Core tests are supposed to measure students' ability to think critically, analyze information, and cite evidence as well as test their conceptual understanding of mathematics and their ability to apply math to the real world. See how you'd do on a Common Core test.
  • 08.28.14

    Questioning the Common Core tests

    In the United States, education standards come with tests. Most students haven't been tested on the Common Core yet. But in one state where they have, the controversy is so intense that it's threatening to bring down the Common Core altogether.

American RadioWorks |
Students in Kentucky taking a Common Core math test. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Greater Expectations

The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there's plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning. Teachers say Common Core has the potential to help kids who are behind, as well as those who are ahead. But many teachers have big concerns about the Common Core tests. The new, tougher tests are meant to let the nation know how kids are really doing in school -- but bad scores could get teachers and principals fired.

Recent Posts

  • 09.02.14

    Teachers embrace the Common Core

    Teachers in Reno, Nevada, were skeptical of the Common Core at first. But they have embraced the new standards as a way to bring better education to students who are struggling in school -- and to kids who are ahead.
  • 08.28.14

    A teacher loses faith in the Common Core

    New York teacher Kevin Glynn was once a big fan of the Common Core, but he says the standardized testing that's come along with it is reducing students to test scores and narrowing what gets taught in schools.
  • 08.28.14

    Are you smarter than a Common Core student? Try a Common Core test

    New Common Core tests are supposed to measure students' ability to think critically, analyze information, and cite evidence as well as test their conceptual understanding of mathematics and their ability to apply math to the real world. See how you'd do on a Common Core test.
  • 08.28.14

    Questioning the Common Core tests

    In the United States, education standards come with tests. Most students haven't been tested on the Common Core yet. But in one state where they have, the controversy is so intense that it's threatening to bring down the Common Core altogether.

Back to The Data

Trips sponsored by

Wildlife Conservation Society


Total cost of 12 trips: $19,936.00


Traveler: Tamera Luzzatto (from the office of Hillary Clinton)
Destination: BELIZE
Purpose: TO LEARN ABOUT THIS NY-BASED ORGANIZATION AND ITS EFFORTS TO PRESERVE IMPT ECOSYSTEMS SPECIAL WHILE PROMOTING NEEDS ECONOMIC PROGRESS IN THIS COUNTRY
Date: Apr 12, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $2,096.00
source

Traveler: Jim Messina (from the office of Byron Dorgan)
Destination: BELIZE
Purpose: TO LEARN ABOUT RESOURCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS, MARINE RESERVES AND CONSERVATION, MEET W/PUBLIC OFFICIALS NGO REPS AND SCIENTISTS
Date: Apr 12, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $1,082.00
source

Traveler: Brett Heimov (from the office of Jerrold Nadler)
Destination: DC TO CHARLOTTE, NC TO BELIZE CITY, BELIZE & RETURN
Purpose: CONSERVATION EDUCATION ACTIVITIES
Date: Apr 12, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $1,082.00
source

Traveler: Robert Taub (from the office of John Mchugh)
Destination: BELIZE
Purpose: TO EXAMINE INTERNATIONAL WILDLIFE CONSERVATION PROGRAMS
Date: Apr 12, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $1,082.00
source

Traveler: Wendy Darwell (from the office of Maurice Hinchey)
Destination: BELIZE CITY, BELIZE
Purpose: FACT-FINDING MISSION ON INTERNATIONAL CONSERVATION EFFORTS
Date: Apr 12, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $1,082.00
source

Traveler: Ellyn Toscano (from the office of Jose Serrano)
Destination: BELIZE
Purpose: ENVIRONMENTAL FACT-FINDING
Date: Apr 12, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $1,082.00
source

Traveler: Polly Trottenberg (from the office of Charles Schumer)
Destination: BELIZE
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL
Date: Mar 20, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $1,980.00
source

Traveler: Anne Marie Anzalone (from the office of Joseph Crowley)
Destination: BELIZE
Purpose: EXPLORE NATURAL WILDLIFE PRESERVES
Date: Mar 20, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $2,530.00
source

Traveler: Christine Pollack (from the office of E. Clay Shaw)
Destination: WASHINGTON, D.C. TO BELIZE CITY, BELIZE
Purpose: TO OBSERVE AND LEARN ABOUT THE WILDLIFE CONSERVATION SOCIETY'S CONSERVATION EFFECTS IN BELIZE AS CONGRESSMAN SHAW'S LEAD STAFFER ON THE INTERNATIONAL CONSERVATION CAUCUS
Date: Mar 20, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $1,980.00
source

Traveler: Nadine Berg (from the office of Jose Serrano)
Destination: BELIZE CITY
Purpose: TO LEARN MORE ABOUT U.S. PROGRAMS THAT SUPPORT INTERNATIONAL BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION AND THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TROPICAL FORESTS AND MARINE ECOSYSTEMS
Date: Mar 20, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $1,980.00
source

Traveler: Christopher Fish (from the office of John Sweeney)
Destination: BELIZE
Purpose: TOUR WILDLIFE CONSERVATION SOCIETY CONSERVATION PROJECTS AND PROGRAMS CONGRESSMAN SWEENEY IS A MEMBER OF THE INTERNATIONAL CONSERVATION CAUCUS
Date: Mar 20, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $1,980.00
source

Traveler: Franklin Thompson (from the office of John Tanner)
Destination: WASH DC-BELIZE, C.A.
Purpose: GROUP WAS TO LEARN OF THE UNITED STATES EFFORTS AND CONTRIBUTIONS TO INTERNATIONAL CONSERVATION AND WILDLIFE PRESERVATION EFFORTS. MEMBER IS CO-CHAIR OF HOUSE INT'L CONSERVATION CAUCUS
Date: Mar 20, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $1,980.00
source



American RadioWorks |
Students in Kentucky taking a Common Core math test. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Greater Expectations

The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there's plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning. Teachers say Common Core has the potential to help kids who are behind, as well as those who are ahead. But many teachers have big concerns about the Common Core tests. The new, tougher tests are meant to let the nation know how kids are really doing in school -- but bad scores could get teachers and principals fired.

Recent Posts

  • 09.02.14

    Teachers embrace the Common Core

    Teachers in Reno, Nevada, were skeptical of the Common Core at first. But they have embraced the new standards as a way to bring better education to students who are struggling in school -- and to kids who are ahead.
  • 08.28.14

    A teacher loses faith in the Common Core

    New York teacher Kevin Glynn was once a big fan of the Common Core, but he says the standardized testing that's come along with it is reducing students to test scores and narrowing what gets taught in schools.
  • 08.28.14

    Are you smarter than a Common Core student? Try a Common Core test

    New Common Core tests are supposed to measure students' ability to think critically, analyze information, and cite evidence as well as test their conceptual understanding of mathematics and their ability to apply math to the real world. See how you'd do on a Common Core test.
  • 08.28.14

    Questioning the Common Core tests

    In the United States, education standards come with tests. Most students haven't been tested on the Common Core yet. But in one state where they have, the controversy is so intense that it's threatening to bring down the Common Core altogether.