American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

Back to The Data

Trips sponsored by

Tri-City Industrial Development Council (TRIDEC)


Total cost of 19 trips: $12,931.96


Traveler: William Miner (from the office of David Wu)
Destination: RICHLAND TO HANFORD
Purpose: FACT FINDING REGARDING THE HANFORD NUC. RESERVATION
Date: Aug 9, 2000 (2 days)
Expense: $188.50
source

Traveler: Chris Huckleberry (from the office of Darlene Hooley)
Destination: HANFORD
Purpose: FACT FINDING MISSION OF HANFORD FACILITIES
Date: Aug 9, 2000 (2 days)
Expense: $188.50
source

Traveler: Jack Silzel (from the office of George Nethercutt)
Destination: TOUR HANFORD FACILITY AT RICHLAND, WASHINGTON
Purpose:
Date: Aug 10, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $195.00
source

Traveler: Rian Windsheiner (from the office of Gordon Smith)
Destination: RICHLAND, WASHINGTON
Purpose: BRIEFINGS AND TOUR OF HANFORD FACILITY
Date: Aug 21, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $80.00
source

Traveler: Richard Krikava (from the office of Gordon Smith)
Destination: TRI-CITIES, WA/HANFORD NUCLEAR FACILITY
Purpose: TOUR OF HANFORD FACILITIES AND REVIEW OF NUCLEAR WASTE MANAGEMENT AND CLEAN UP
Date: Aug 21, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $200.00
source

Traveler: Jeff Markey (from the office of Doc Hastings)
Destination: RICHLAND, WA
Purpose: FACT FINDING TO HENFORD RESERVATION
Date: Aug 22, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $225.00
source

Traveler: Tim Valentine (from the office of Lamar Alexander)
Destination: RICHLAND, WASHINGTON
Purpose: TOUR THE HANFORD CLEANUP SITE AND THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL LABORATORY
Date: Aug 5, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $1,449.44
source

Traveler: Scott Baker (from the office of Jay Inslee)
Destination: Tri-Cities, WA
Purpose: OFFICIAL VISIT TO DEPT. OF ENERGY'S HANFORD CLEANUP SITE.
Date: Aug 5, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $815.41
source

Traveler: David Dreher (from the office of Peter Defazio)
Destination: RICHLAND, WA
Purpose: INFORMATION TOUR OF HANDFORD NUCLEAR RES.
Date: Aug 5, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $547.13
source

Traveler: Jessica Gleason (from the office of Doc Hastings)
Destination: HANFORD NUCLEAR WASTE SITE
Purpose: STAFF TRIP/TOUR HANFORD NUCLEAR WASTE SITE
Date: Aug 6, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $1,174.81
source

Traveler: Todd Young (from the office of Doc Hastings)
Destination: RICHLAND, WA
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL STAFF TOUR OF HANFORD NUCLEAR CLEANUP SITE
Date: Aug 8, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $1,511.90
source

Traveler: Greg Thomas (from the office of J. Gresham Barrett)
Destination: RICHLAND, WASHINGTON
Purpose: HANFORD SITE FACT-FINDING VISIT
Date: Aug 9, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $862.87
source

Traveler: Eli Hopson (from the office of Sherwood Boehlert)
Destination: HANFORD, WA - SEATTLE, WA
Purpose: TO PERFORM OVERSIGHT AT THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL LABORATORY, AND TOUR THE NUCLEAR WASTE SUE AT HANFORD
Date: Aug 9, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $1,306.22
source

Traveler: Jessica Gleason (from the office of Doc Hastings)
Destination: HANFORD NUCLEAR WASTE SITE IN WASHINGTON STATE
Purpose: HANFORD SITE FACT-FINDING VISIT
Date: Aug 9, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $1,147.40
source

Traveler: Karl Anderson (from the office of George Nethercutt)
Destination: PASCO, WA
Purpose: HANFORD SITE FACT-FINDING VISIT
Date: Aug 9, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $1,178.41
source

Traveler: Sean Hughes (from the office of Jim Mcdermott)
Destination: SPOKANE, WA - PASCO, WA
Purpose: HANFORD SITE FACT-FINDING VISIT
Date: Aug 18, 2005 (6 days)
Expense: $501.25
source

Traveler: Louis Lauter (from the office of Rick Larsen)
Destination: RICHLAND
Purpose: TO STUDY NUCLEAR WASTE CLEANUP ACTIVITIES * THE HANFORD NUCLEAR RESERVATION
Date: Aug 21, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $299.54
source

Traveler: David Condon (from the office of Cathy Mcmorris)
Destination: RICHLAND
Purpose: LEARN ABOUT PROGRAMS AT HANFORD AND PNNL
Date: Aug 21, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $231.86
source

Traveler: George Poulios (from the office of Cathy Mcmorris)
Destination: DC TO PASCO, WA
Purpose: FACT FINDING TOUR OF THE DEPT. OF ENERGY'S HANFORD SITE IN WA STATE. RECEIVED BRIEFINGS ON ENVIRONMENTAL CLEANUP PROGRESS. MET WITH DOE OFFICIALS AND PROJECT MANAGERS
Date: Aug 21, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $828.72
source



American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.