American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
Students in Kentucky taking a Common Core math test. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Greater Expectations

The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there's plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning. Teachers say Common Core has the potential to help kids who are behind, as well as those who are ahead. But many teachers have big concerns about the Common Core tests. The new, tougher tests are meant to let the nation know how kids are really doing in school -- but bad scores could get teachers and principals fired.

Recent Posts

  • 08.29.14

    Greater Expectations transcript

  • 08.28.14

    A teacher loses faith in the Common Core

    New York teacher Kevin Glynn was once a big fan of the Common Core, but he says the standardized testing that's come along with it is reducing students to test scores and narrowing what gets taught in schools.
  • 08.28.14

    Are you smarter than a Common Core student? Try a Common Core test

    New Common Core tests are supposed to measure students' ability to think critically, analyze information, and cite evidence as well as test their conceptual understanding of mathematics and their ability to apply math to the real world. See how you'd do on a Common Core test.
  • 08.28.14

    Questioning the Common Core tests

    In the United States, education standards come with tests. Most students haven't been tested on the Common Core yet. But in one state where they have, the controversy is so intense that it's threatening to bring down the Common Core altogether.

American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
Students in Kentucky taking a Common Core math test. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Greater Expectations

The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there's plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning. Teachers say Common Core has the potential to help kids who are behind, as well as those who are ahead. But many teachers have big concerns about the Common Core tests. The new, tougher tests are meant to let the nation know how kids are really doing in school -- but bad scores could get teachers and principals fired.

Recent Posts

  • 08.29.14

    Greater Expectations transcript

  • 08.28.14

    A teacher loses faith in the Common Core

    New York teacher Kevin Glynn was once a big fan of the Common Core, but he says the standardized testing that's come along with it is reducing students to test scores and narrowing what gets taught in schools.
  • 08.28.14

    Are you smarter than a Common Core student? Try a Common Core test

    New Common Core tests are supposed to measure students' ability to think critically, analyze information, and cite evidence as well as test their conceptual understanding of mathematics and their ability to apply math to the real world. See how you'd do on a Common Core test.
  • 08.28.14

    Questioning the Common Core tests

    In the United States, education standards come with tests. Most students haven't been tested on the Common Core yet. But in one state where they have, the controversy is so intense that it's threatening to bring down the Common Core altogether.

Back to The Data

Trips sponsored by

Tri-City Industrial Development Council (TRIDEC)


Total cost of 19 trips: $12,931.96


Traveler: William Miner (from the office of David Wu)
Destination: RICHLAND TO HANFORD
Purpose: FACT FINDING REGARDING THE HANFORD NUC. RESERVATION
Date: Aug 9, 2000 (2 days)
Expense: $188.50
source

Traveler: Chris Huckleberry (from the office of Darlene Hooley)
Destination: HANFORD
Purpose: FACT FINDING MISSION OF HANFORD FACILITIES
Date: Aug 9, 2000 (2 days)
Expense: $188.50
source

Traveler: Jack Silzel (from the office of George Nethercutt)
Destination: TOUR HANFORD FACILITY AT RICHLAND, WASHINGTON
Purpose:
Date: Aug 10, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $195.00
source

Traveler: Rian Windsheiner (from the office of Gordon Smith)
Destination: RICHLAND, WASHINGTON
Purpose: BRIEFINGS AND TOUR OF HANFORD FACILITY
Date: Aug 21, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $80.00
source

Traveler: Richard Krikava (from the office of Gordon Smith)
Destination: TRI-CITIES, WA/HANFORD NUCLEAR FACILITY
Purpose: TOUR OF HANFORD FACILITIES AND REVIEW OF NUCLEAR WASTE MANAGEMENT AND CLEAN UP
Date: Aug 21, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $200.00
source

Traveler: Jeff Markey (from the office of Doc Hastings)
Destination: RICHLAND, WA
Purpose: FACT FINDING TO HENFORD RESERVATION
Date: Aug 22, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $225.00
source

Traveler: Tim Valentine (from the office of Lamar Alexander)
Destination: RICHLAND, WASHINGTON
Purpose: TOUR THE HANFORD CLEANUP SITE AND THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL LABORATORY
Date: Aug 5, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $1,449.44
source

Traveler: Scott Baker (from the office of Jay Inslee)
Destination: Tri-Cities, WA
Purpose: OFFICIAL VISIT TO DEPT. OF ENERGY'S HANFORD CLEANUP SITE.
Date: Aug 5, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $815.41
source

Traveler: David Dreher (from the office of Peter Defazio)
Destination: RICHLAND, WA
Purpose: INFORMATION TOUR OF HANDFORD NUCLEAR RES.
Date: Aug 5, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $547.13
source

Traveler: Jessica Gleason (from the office of Doc Hastings)
Destination: HANFORD NUCLEAR WASTE SITE
Purpose: STAFF TRIP/TOUR HANFORD NUCLEAR WASTE SITE
Date: Aug 6, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $1,174.81
source

Traveler: Todd Young (from the office of Doc Hastings)
Destination: RICHLAND, WA
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL STAFF TOUR OF HANFORD NUCLEAR CLEANUP SITE
Date: Aug 8, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $1,511.90
source

Traveler: Greg Thomas (from the office of J. Gresham Barrett)
Destination: RICHLAND, WASHINGTON
Purpose: HANFORD SITE FACT-FINDING VISIT
Date: Aug 9, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $862.87
source

Traveler: Eli Hopson (from the office of Sherwood Boehlert)
Destination: HANFORD, WA - SEATTLE, WA
Purpose: TO PERFORM OVERSIGHT AT THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL LABORATORY, AND TOUR THE NUCLEAR WASTE SUE AT HANFORD
Date: Aug 9, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $1,306.22
source

Traveler: Jessica Gleason (from the office of Doc Hastings)
Destination: HANFORD NUCLEAR WASTE SITE IN WASHINGTON STATE
Purpose: HANFORD SITE FACT-FINDING VISIT
Date: Aug 9, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $1,147.40
source

Traveler: Karl Anderson (from the office of George Nethercutt)
Destination: PASCO, WA
Purpose: HANFORD SITE FACT-FINDING VISIT
Date: Aug 9, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $1,178.41
source

Traveler: Sean Hughes (from the office of Jim Mcdermott)
Destination: SPOKANE, WA - PASCO, WA
Purpose: HANFORD SITE FACT-FINDING VISIT
Date: Aug 18, 2005 (6 days)
Expense: $501.25
source

Traveler: Louis Lauter (from the office of Rick Larsen)
Destination: RICHLAND
Purpose: TO STUDY NUCLEAR WASTE CLEANUP ACTIVITIES * THE HANFORD NUCLEAR RESERVATION
Date: Aug 21, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $299.54
source

Traveler: David Condon (from the office of Cathy Mcmorris)
Destination: RICHLAND
Purpose: LEARN ABOUT PROGRAMS AT HANFORD AND PNNL
Date: Aug 21, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $231.86
source

Traveler: George Poulios (from the office of Cathy Mcmorris)
Destination: DC TO PASCO, WA
Purpose: FACT FINDING TOUR OF THE DEPT. OF ENERGY'S HANFORD SITE IN WA STATE. RECEIVED BRIEFINGS ON ENVIRONMENTAL CLEANUP PROGRESS. MET WITH DOE OFFICIALS AND PROJECT MANAGERS
Date: Aug 21, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $828.72
source



American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
Students in Kentucky taking a Common Core math test. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Greater Expectations

The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there's plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning. Teachers say Common Core has the potential to help kids who are behind, as well as those who are ahead. But many teachers have big concerns about the Common Core tests. The new, tougher tests are meant to let the nation know how kids are really doing in school -- but bad scores could get teachers and principals fired.

Recent Posts

  • 08.29.14

    Greater Expectations transcript

  • 08.28.14

    A teacher loses faith in the Common Core

    New York teacher Kevin Glynn was once a big fan of the Common Core, but he says the standardized testing that's come along with it is reducing students to test scores and narrowing what gets taught in schools.
  • 08.28.14

    Are you smarter than a Common Core student? Try a Common Core test

    New Common Core tests are supposed to measure students' ability to think critically, analyze information, and cite evidence as well as test their conceptual understanding of mathematics and their ability to apply math to the real world. See how you'd do on a Common Core test.
  • 08.28.14

    Questioning the Common Core tests

    In the United States, education standards come with tests. Most students haven't been tested on the Common Core yet. But in one state where they have, the controversy is so intense that it's threatening to bring down the Common Core altogether.