American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball

American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball

Back to The Data

Trips sponsored by

Save The Children


Total cost of 10 trips: $30,307.12


Traveler: Shannon Smith (from the office of Richard Durbin)
Destination: WASHINGTON TO MALAWI
Purpose: FACT FINDING
Date: Aug 21, 2004 (9 days)
Expense: $3,197.00
source

Traveler: Mandy Folse (from the office of Mary Landrieu)
Destination: MALAWI, AFRICA
Purpose: FACT-FINDING, STUDY TOUR
Date: Aug 21, 2004 (9 days)
Expense: $3,197.00
source

Traveler: Mary Andrus (from the office of Jim Leach)
Destination: LILONGWE, MALAWI
Purpose: TO VISIT HIV/AIDS PROGRAMS, HEALTH CLINICS, HOSPITALS AND SCHOOLS TO OBSERVE HOW PROGRAMS ARE WORKING AND TALK WITH THOSE WHO ARE PROVIDING SERVICES TO LEARN MORE ABOUT PROJECTS THAT ARE SUCCESSFUL
Date: Aug 21, 2004 (9 days)
Expense: $3,197.00
source

Traveler: Grady Bourn (from the office of Jerry Lewis)
Destination: IAD-LONDON-JOHANNESBURG-LILONGWE
Purpose: FACT-FINDING TRIP FOCUSED ON AIDS AND EDUCATION ISSUES IN MALAWI, AFRICA
Date: Aug 21, 2004 (9 days)
Expense: $3,197.00
source

Traveler: Cindy Buhl (from the office of James Mcgovern)
Destination: ADDIS ABABA, ETHIOPIA
Purpose: VISIT AND REVIEW USAID-FUNDED CHILD SURVIVAL, MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH CARE, HIV/AIDS, ORPHANS AND VULNERABLE CHILDREN, PRIMARY EDUCATION, AND MICRO-ENTERPRISE PROGRAMS IN ETHIOPIA
Date: Aug 13, 2005 (7 days)
Expense: $3,110.35
source

Traveler: Christos Tsentas (from the office of Barbara Lee)
Destination: ADDIS ABABA, ETHIOPIA
Purpose: OBSERVE SAVE THE CHILDREN PROGRAMS FOR ORPHANS & VULNERABLE CHILDREN, SUPPLEMENTARY FEEDING, AND HIV/AIDS & INTERACTION WITH UNITED STATES MISSION IN ETHIOPIA
Date: Aug 13, 2005 (7 days)
Expense: $3,110.35
source

Traveler: Shelly Stoneman (from the office of Steven Rothman)
Destination: ADDIS ABABA, ETHIOPIA
Purpose: FACT-FINDING/EDUCATIONAL: LEARN ABOUT SAVE THE CHILDREN'S FOREIGN AID PROJECTS IN ETHIOPIA
Date: Aug 13, 2005 (7 days)
Expense: $3,110.35
source

Traveler: Jordan Press (from the office of Christopher Shays)
Destination: ADDIS ABABA, ETHIOPIA
Purpose: TO LEARN HOW SAVE THE CHILDREN WORKS WITH U.S. GOVERNMENT AND PRIVATE FUNDS TO ADDRESS THE NEEDS OF CHILDREN AND THEIR FAMILIES IN A DEVELOPING COUNTRY. WE VISITED A VARIETY OF PROGRAMS, WITH A FOCUS ON FOOD AID AND HIV/AIDS, BUT ALSO MODEL PROGRAMS IN ED
Date: Aug 13, 2005 (7 days)
Expense: $3,110.35
source

Traveler: Susan Brown (from the office of Anne Northup)
Destination: HONGKONG TO JAKARTA INDONESIA, TOKYO
Purpose: TO GET A PROGRESS REPORT ON POST-TSUNAMI RECONSTRUCTION AND THE STATUS/WELL-BEING OF DISPLACED & ORPHANED CHILDREN
Date: Aug 20, 2005 (11 days)
Expense: $2,538.86
source

Traveler: Shiloh Reiher (from the office of Deborah Pryce)
Destination: JAKARTA, INDONESIA-BANDA ACEH-HKOSEMAWE
Purpose: STUDY TOUR OF EMERGENCY PROTECTION PROGRAMS IN INDONESIA, INCLUDING THE TSUNAMI-AFFECTED REGION
Date: Aug 20, 2005 (8 days)
Expense: $2,538.86
source



American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball