American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

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American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 11.17.14

    The Utility of a PhD

    Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
  • 11.12.14

    The Roosevelts as a political team

    Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: The Internet of the 1930s

    Some predicted radio would be a powerful force for democratizing information and spreading knowledge to a vast population previously separated by geography or income. But the new technology also raised anxieties.

Back to The Data

Trips sponsored by

National Center for Family Literacy


Total cost of 11 trips: $8,714.47


Traveler: Alex Nock (from the office of William Clay)
Destination: ORLANDO, FLORIDA
Purpose: SEVERAL SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT AND POLICY DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOPS
Date: Jan 21, 2000 (5 days)
Expense: $1,265.00
source

Traveler: Lynn Selmser (from the office of William Goodling)
Destination: ORLANDO, FLORIDA
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN A CONFERENCE FOR THE NATIONAL CENTER FOR FAMILY LITERACY TO DISCUSS FAMILY LITERACY
Date: Jan 21, 2000 (4 days)
Expense: $1,459.14
source

Traveler: William Goodling (from the office of William Goodling)
Destination: ORLANDO, FLORIDA
Purpose: KEYNOTE SPEECH
Date: Jan 23, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $418.00
source

Traveler: Lynn Selmser (from the office of John Boehner)
Destination: TENTH ANNUAL NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON FAMILY LITERACY, MARCH 18-20 IN DALLAS, TEXAS
Purpose: PARTICIPATE IN TENTH ANNUAL NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON FAMILY LITERACY
Date: Mar 17, 2001 (3 days)
Expense: $969.23
source

Traveler: Lauren Gibbs (from the office of Raul Grijalva)
Destination: ORLANDO
Purpose: SPEAKING AT SEVERAL POLICY WORKSHOPS
Date: Feb 28, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $971.70
source

Traveler: Alex Nock (from the office of George Miller)
Destination: ORLANDO, FL
Purpose: SPEAK AT CONFERENCE, ATTEND CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS
Date: Feb 28, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $919.00
source

Traveler: Sally Lovejoy (from the office of John Boehner)
Destination: DULLES/ORLANDO AIRPORT
Purpose: PANEL TO DISCUSS FAMILY LITERACY IN THE HEAD START ACT
Date: Mar 1, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $984.00
source

Traveler: Lauren Gibbs (from the office of Raul Grijalva)
Destination: LOUISVILLE, KY
Purpose: ATTEND BOARD MEETING ON BEHALF OF THE CONGRESSMAN
Date: Apr 23, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $531.30
source

Traveler: Laura Schiebelhut (from the office of Patrick Kennedy)
Destination: LOUISVILLE, KY
Purpose: TO LEARN ABOUT THE PROGRAMS OF THE NCFL'S HISPANIC FAMILY LITERACY INITIATIVE
Date: Apr 23, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $315.20
source

Traveler: Alex Nock (from the office of George Miller)
Destination: LOUISVILLE, KY
Purpose: SPEAK AT NCFL ANNUAL CONFERENCE
Date: Apr 24, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $485.00
source

Traveler: Susan Brown (from the office of Anne Northup)
Destination: LOUISVILLE, KY
Purpose: 2005 FAMILY LITERACY CONFERENCE
Date: Apr 25, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $396.90
source



American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 11.17.14

    The Utility of a PhD

    Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
  • 11.12.14

    The Roosevelts as a political team

    Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: The Internet of the 1930s

    Some predicted radio would be a powerful force for democratizing information and spreading knowledge to a vast population previously separated by geography or income. But the new technology also raised anxieties.