American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

Back to The Data

Trips sponsored by

Global Health Council


Total cost of 21 trips: $63,602.56


Traveler: Wendy Brafman (from the office of Sheila Jackson Lee)
Destination:
Purpose: MATERNAL & CHILD HEALTH FACT FINDING
Date: Aug 16, 2001 (10 days)
Expense: $2,008.00
source

Traveler: Rajah Manno (from the office of Sheila Jackson Lee)
Destination:
Purpose: CHILD HEALTH FACT COLLECTION
Date: Aug 16, 2001 (10 days)
Expense: $2,013.00
source

Traveler: Toby Croll (from the office of Jim Jeffords)
Destination: GUATEMALA AND HONDURAS
Purpose: FACT-FINDING MISSION TO ANALYZE U.S. AID AND NON-GOVERNMENT ORGANIZATIONS EFFORTS IN PROMOTING AND PARTICIPATING IN CHILD AND MATERNAL HEALTH PROGRAMS
Date: Aug 18, 2001 (8 days)
Expense: $1,973.00
source

Traveler: Ryan Thrasher (from the office of James Mcgovern)
Destination: GUATEMALA & HONDURAS
Purpose: TO COLLECT INFORMATION ON MATERNITY/INFANT HEALTH
Date: Aug 18, 2001 (8 days)
Expense: $2,000.00
source

Traveler: Christina Ho (from the office of Hillary Clinton)
Destination: CATE D'IVOIRE, BURKINA FASO
Purpose: LEARNING ABOUT HIV/AIDS IN AFRICA AND EFFORTS TO ADDRESS HIV/AIDS
Date: Jan 6, 2002 (8 days)
Expense: $3,172.32
source

Traveler: Charity Bracy (from the office of Dianne Feinstein)
Destination: COTE D'IVOIRE AND BURKINA FASO
Purpose: A STUDY TRIP TO VISIT HIV/AIDS PROGRAMS IN WEST AFRICA
Date: Jan 6, 2002 (8 days)
Expense: $3,172.32
source

Traveler: Mary Andrus (from the office of Jim Leach)
Destination: PARIS
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL STUDY TOUR LOOKING AT HIV/AIDS ISSUES AND PROGRAMS IN WEST AFRICA
Date: Jan 6, 2002 (9 days)
Expense: $3,172.32
source

Traveler: Noelle Lusane (from the office of Donald Payne)
Destination: COTE D'IVOIRE AND BURKINA FASO (WEST AFRICA)
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL TRIP TO SEE HOW USAID FUNDED AIDS PROGRAMS ARE OPERATING
Date: Jan 6, 2002 (8 days)
Expense: $3,172.32
source

Traveler: Jeannette Windon (from the office of Mark Kirk)
Destination: ABIDJAN, COTE D'IVOIRE AND OUAGADOUGOU, BURKINA FASO
Purpose: STUDY HIV/AIDS SITUATION
Date: Jan 6, 2002 (9 days)
Expense: $3,172.32
source

Traveler: Clare Coleman (from the office of Nita Lowey)
Destination: COTE D'HOME & BUKINA FASO, WEST AFRICA
Purpose: STUDY US GOV'T-FUNDED HIV/AIDS PROGRAMS
Date: Jan 6, 2002 (9 days)
Expense: $3,172.32
source

Traveler: Deborah Altenburg (from the office of Sherwood Boehlert)
Destination: COTE D' IVOIRE & BURKINA FASO
Purpose: A STUDY TOUR OF HIV/AIDS AND GLOBAL HEALTH ISSUES
Date: Jan 6, 2002 (9 days)
Expense: $3,172.32
source

Traveler: Michael Riggs (from the office of Barbara Lee)
Destination: COTE D'IVOIRE AND BURKINA FASO
Purpose: HIV AIDS STUDY TOUR
Date: Jan 6, 2002 (9 days)
Expense: $3,172.32
source

Traveler: Julie Jolly (from the office of Christopher Bond)
Destination: HAITI
Purpose: TO PROVIDE AN OPPORTUNITY FOR KEY CONGRESSIONAL STAFF TO OBSERVE HEALTH PROGRAMS SUPPORTED THROUGH USAID, OTHER DONORS, THE PRIVATE SECTOR AND MULTILATERAL ORGANS
Date: Aug 11, 2003 (4 days)
Expense: $1,411.00
source

Traveler: Rachel Hansen (from the office of William Janklow)
Destination: HAITI
Purpose: A STUDY TOUR OF HAITI HIGHLIGHTING HIV/AIDS, MATERNAL HEALTH, CHILD SURVIVAL, AND OTHER GLOBAL HEALTH ISSUES TO PROVIDE AN OPPORTUNITY FOR KEY CONGRESSIONAL STAFF TO OBSERVE HEALTH PROGRAMS SUPPORTED BY U.S. AID AND OTHER DONORS OF THE PRIVATE SECTOR AND
Date: Aug 11, 2003 (4 days)
Expense: $1,411.00
source

Traveler: Ashley Etienne (from the office of Chris Bell)
Destination: HAITI
Purpose: FACT-FINDING MISSION TO OBSERVE HEALTH PROGRAMS
Date: Aug 11, 2003 (4 days)
Expense: $1,411.00
source

Traveler: Debra Armentrout (from the office of Robert Wexler)
Destination: WENT TO HAITI
Purpose: STUDY TOUR OF PROGRAMS FOR GLOBAL HEALTH ISSUES
Date: Aug 11, 2003 (4 days)
Expense: $1,411.00
source

Traveler: Kathy Kulkarni (from the office of Frank Pallone)
Destination: PORT AU PRINCE
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL TRIP ON HEALTH AND CHILD SURVIVAL PROJECTS IN HAITI.
Date: Aug 11, 2003 (4 days)
Expense: $1,411.00
source

Traveler: Stephen Northrup (from the office of Michael Enzi)
Destination: INDIA (BOMBAY, CHENNAI, AND DELHI)
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL MISSION TO SEE AND DISCUSS HEALTHCARE ISSUES FACING INDIA, WITH SPECIAL EMPHASIS ON WOMEN AND CHILDREN, AND THE GROWING HIV/AIDS EPIDEMIC
Date: Jan 4, 2004 (9 days)
Expense: $5,826.00
source

Traveler: Jennifer Platt (from the office of Katherine Harris)
Destination: WASHINGTON, DC-INDIA-NEW YORK CITY
Purpose: GATHER INFORMATION & EXAMINE HEALTH ISSUES FOR WOMEN AND CHILDREN IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES
Date: Jan 4, 2004 (9 days)
Expense: $5,783.00
source

Traveler: Ray Smith (from the office of Ander Crenshaw)
Destination: MUMBAI, INDIA-CHENNAI, INDIA-DELHI, INDIA
Purpose: EXAMINING CURRENT HEALTH PROBLEMS FACING THE NATION OF INDIA WITH A FOCUS ON HIV/AIDS
Date: Jan 4, 2004 (9 days)
Expense: $5,783.00
source

Traveler: Jesse Kerns (from the office of Jim Mcdermott)
Destination: MUMBAI, CHENNAI - NEW DELHI, INDIA
Purpose: REVIEW CHILD AND MATERNAL HEALTH PROGRAMS, LEARN ABOUT USAID FUNDED HEALTH PROJECTS
Date: Jan 4, 2004 (12 days)
Expense: $5,783.00
source



American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.