American RadioWorks |
Students in Kentucky taking a Common Core math test. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Greater Expectations

The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there's plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning. Teachers say Common Core has the potential to help kids who are behind, as well as those who are ahead. But many teachers have big concerns about the Common Core tests. The new, tougher tests are meant to let the nation know how kids are really doing in school -- but bad scores could get teachers and principals fired.

Recent Posts

  • 09.02.14

    Teachers embrace the Common Core

    Teachers in Reno, Nevada, were skeptical of the Common Core at first. But they have embraced the new standards as a way to bring better education to students who are struggling in school -- and to kids who are ahead.
  • 08.28.14

    A teacher loses faith in the Common Core

    New York teacher Kevin Glynn was once a big fan of the Common Core, but he says the standardized testing that's come along with it is reducing students to test scores and narrowing what gets taught in schools.
  • 08.28.14

    Are you smarter than a Common Core student? Try a Common Core test

    New Common Core tests are supposed to measure students' ability to think critically, analyze information, and cite evidence as well as test their conceptual understanding of mathematics and their ability to apply math to the real world. See how you'd do on a Common Core test.
  • 08.28.14

    Questioning the Common Core tests

    In the United States, education standards come with tests. Most students haven't been tested on the Common Core yet. But in one state where they have, the controversy is so intense that it's threatening to bring down the Common Core altogether.

American RadioWorks |
Students in Kentucky taking a Common Core math test. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Greater Expectations

The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there's plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning. Teachers say Common Core has the potential to help kids who are behind, as well as those who are ahead. But many teachers have big concerns about the Common Core tests. The new, tougher tests are meant to let the nation know how kids are really doing in school -- but bad scores could get teachers and principals fired.

Recent Posts

  • 09.02.14

    Teachers embrace the Common Core

    Teachers in Reno, Nevada, were skeptical of the Common Core at first. But they have embraced the new standards as a way to bring better education to students who are struggling in school -- and to kids who are ahead.
  • 08.28.14

    A teacher loses faith in the Common Core

    New York teacher Kevin Glynn was once a big fan of the Common Core, but he says the standardized testing that's come along with it is reducing students to test scores and narrowing what gets taught in schools.
  • 08.28.14

    Are you smarter than a Common Core student? Try a Common Core test

    New Common Core tests are supposed to measure students' ability to think critically, analyze information, and cite evidence as well as test their conceptual understanding of mathematics and their ability to apply math to the real world. See how you'd do on a Common Core test.
  • 08.28.14

    Questioning the Common Core tests

    In the United States, education standards come with tests. Most students haven't been tested on the Common Core yet. But in one state where they have, the controversy is so intense that it's threatening to bring down the Common Core altogether.

Back to The Data

Trips sponsored by

Federal Home Loan Bank of Seattle


Total cost of 21 trips: $45,549.66


Traveler: John Phillips (from the office of John Kerry)
Destination: SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Purpose: TO LEARN MORE ABOUT FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK HOUSING AND SMALL BUSINESS LENDING INITIATIVES
Date: Aug 30, 2000 (5 days)
Expense: $998.00
source

Traveler: Greg Davis (from the office of Charles Gonzalez)
Destination: SEATTLE TO SF
Purpose: FACT FINDING - FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK SYSTEM
Date: Aug 30, 2000 (2 days)
Expense: $754.14
source

Traveler: Roelof Vander Lugt (from the office of Jay Inslee)
Destination: TRAVEL DAY AUG. 30, 2000, SEMINAR AUG. 31 & SEPT 1. TRAVEL DAY SEPT. 2, 2000
Purpose: SEMINAR OF THE HOME LOAN BANK SYSTEM & GSE'S
Date: Aug 30, 2000 (3 days)
Expense: $991.20
source

Traveler: Ashley Cohen (from the office of Jennifer Dunn)
Destination: SEATTLE, WA
Purpose: BANKING SEMINAR
Date: Aug 30, 2000 (2 days)
Expense: $891.00
source

Traveler: Daniel Arlhetz (from the office of Lee Terry)
Destination: STAFF BRIEFING THRS. AUG 31 / TOUR OF REDEVELOPED HOMES ON FRIDAY SEPT. 1
Purpose: STAFF SEMINAR
Date: Aug 30, 2000 (4 days)
Expense: $1,273.20
source

Traveler: James Datri (from the office of Robert Menendez)
Destination: SEATTLE, WA
Purpose: FACT-FINDING: TO SEE FIRST-HAND THE OPERATIONS OF THE HOME LOAN BANK; MEET WITH BANK OFFICIALS & STAFF; AND VISIT BANK-BACKED HOUSING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS
Date: Aug 30, 2000 (3 days)
Expense: $2,820.95
source

Traveler: Heather Mchugh (from the office of Nydia Velazquez)
Destination: FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK (FHLB) CONGRESSIONAL STAFF SEMINAR
Purpose: FHLB CONGRESSIONAL STAFF SEMINAR
Date: Aug 30, 2000 (2 days)
Expense: $831.14
source

Traveler: Richard Baker (from the office of Richard Baker)
Destination: SEATTLE
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT
Date: Aug 31, 2000 (2 days)
Expense: $1,265.00
source

Traveler: Vergil Cabasco (from the office of Jennifer Dunn)
Destination: SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Purpose: FACT FINDING
Date: Aug 26, 2002 (7 days)
Expense: $1,318.60
source

Traveler: Phoebe Riner (from the office of Evan Bayh)
Destination: SEATTLE, WA
Purpose: FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK OF SEATTLE'S CONGRESSIONAL STAFF SEMINAR
Date: Aug 28, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $2,143.00
source

Traveler: James Conzelman (from the office of Michael Oxley)
Destination: WASHINGTON, DC R/T TO KONA, HI
Purpose: FACT FINDING
Date: Apr 5, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $7,397.01
source

Traveler: Richard Baker (from the office of Richard Baker)
Destination: DCA-KONA-BTR
Purpose: TO SPEAK AT VARIOUS MEETINGS AT THEIR CONFERENCE AND REVIEWED HOUSING ISSUES
Date: Apr 6, 2004 (5 days)
Expense: $9,311.84
source

Traveler: Paul Sawyer (from the office of Richard Baker)
Destination: KONA, HAWAII
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL, DISCUSSION OF FHLB REGULATION, AFFORDABLE HOUSING TOUR
Date: Apr 6, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $4,008.87
source

Traveler: Bryan Corbett (from the office of Richard Shelby)
Destination: SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Purpose: TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE BANKS STRUCTURE AND THE REGULATORY ISSUES CONTRUCTING THE BANKS AS THE COMMITTEE CONSIDERS CREATIONS A NEW REBULATOR
Date: Aug 11, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $1,494.75
source

Traveler: Leslie Woolley (from the office of Zell Miller)
Destination: SEATTLE
Purpose: FACT FINDING
Date: Aug 11, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $1,598.75
source

Traveler: C Scott Canady (from the office of Richard Baker)
Destination: SEATTLE
Purpose: MEET WITH BANK STAFF AND ATTEND SEMINARS DISCUSSING THE BANK SYSTEM AND PROPOSALS TO ALTER THE SYSTEM'S REGULATOR.
Date: Aug 11, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $1,291.96
source

Traveler: Kevin Macmillan (from the office of Michael Oxley)
Destination: SEATTLE, WA
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL STAFF SEMINARE
Date: Aug 11, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $1,311.05
source

Traveler: Vergil Cabasco (from the office of Jennifer Dunn)
Destination: SEATTLE
Purpose: EDUCATION
Date: Aug 11, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $1,471.76
source

Traveler: Emily Pfeiffer (from the office of Michael Castle)
Destination: DC TO SEATTLE, WA
Purpose: FACT FINDING
Date: Aug 11, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $1,572.95
source

Traveler: Aysha House-Moshi (from the office of Barbara Lee)
Destination: SEATTLE
Purpose: FACT FINDING AND EDUCATIONAL BRIEFING ON THE FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK AND THE HISTORY OF THE GOVERNMENT SPONSORED ENTERPRISES.
Date: Aug 12, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $2,551.94
source

Traveler: Roelof Van Der Lugt (from the office of Jay Inslee)
Destination: SEATTLE, WA
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL STAFF SEMINAR-SECONDARY MORTGAGE MARKET
Date: Aug 12, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $252.55
source



American RadioWorks |
Students in Kentucky taking a Common Core math test. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Greater Expectations

The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there's plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning. Teachers say Common Core has the potential to help kids who are behind, as well as those who are ahead. But many teachers have big concerns about the Common Core tests. The new, tougher tests are meant to let the nation know how kids are really doing in school -- but bad scores could get teachers and principals fired.

Recent Posts

  • 09.02.14

    Teachers embrace the Common Core

    Teachers in Reno, Nevada, were skeptical of the Common Core at first. But they have embraced the new standards as a way to bring better education to students who are struggling in school -- and to kids who are ahead.
  • 08.28.14

    A teacher loses faith in the Common Core

    New York teacher Kevin Glynn was once a big fan of the Common Core, but he says the standardized testing that's come along with it is reducing students to test scores and narrowing what gets taught in schools.
  • 08.28.14

    Are you smarter than a Common Core student? Try a Common Core test

    New Common Core tests are supposed to measure students' ability to think critically, analyze information, and cite evidence as well as test their conceptual understanding of mathematics and their ability to apply math to the real world. See how you'd do on a Common Core test.
  • 08.28.14

    Questioning the Common Core tests

    In the United States, education standards come with tests. Most students haven't been tested on the Common Core yet. But in one state where they have, the controversy is so intense that it's threatening to bring down the Common Core altogether.