American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

Back to The Data

Trips sponsored by

Ascension Health


Total cost of 7 trips: $7,206.16


Traveler: Alice Weiss (from the office of Max Baucus)
Destination: AUSTIN, TX
Purpose: SITE VISIT TO EVALUATE PRIVATE NON-PROFIT HEALTH CARE SAFETY
Date: Oct 25, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $1,485.00
source

Traveler: Jim Esquea (from the office of Kent Conrad)
Destination: AUSTIN, TEXAS
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL STAFF SITE VISIT OF LOCAL HOSPITALS, COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTERS, AND HEALTH CLINICS
Date: Oct 25, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $907.00
source

Traveler: Valerie Henry (from the office of Greg Walden)
Destination: AUSTIN TX
Purpose: SITE VISIT TO SEE PRIVATE, NON PROFIT HEALTH SYSTEM APPROACH TO TREATING LOW-INCOME AND UNINSURED PATIENTS IN COMMUNITY CLINICS AROUND AUSTIN TX
Date: Oct 25, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $907.00
source

Traveler: Eric Rasmussen (from the office of Michael Crapo)
Destination: NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL SITE VISIT TO EXAMINE EFFORTS TO EXPAND ACCESS TO HEALTH CARE FOR UNINSURED AND LOW-INCOME FAMILIES
Date: Feb 23, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $915.64
source

Traveler: Ari Strauss (from the office of Tim Holden)
Destination: NEW ORLEANS, LA
Purpose: TO PROVIDE AN OPPORTUNITY TO SEE FIRSTHAND THE HEALTHCARE SAFETY NET FOR LOW-INCOME AND UNINSURE FAMILIES
Date: Feb 23, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $1,160.24
source

Traveler: Joye Purser (from the office of Lincoln Davis)
Destination: NEW ORLEANS, LA
Purpose: INTRODUCE CONGRESSIONAL STAFF TO ASCENSION HEALTH AND ITS MODEL AS A HEALTH CARE SAFETY NET PROVIDER
Date: Feb 23, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $915.64
source

Traveler: Robin Goracke (from the office of Collin Peterson)
Destination: NEW ORLEANS
Purpose: TO EXPAND COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTERS TO INCLUDE RELIGIOUS-SPONSORED HEALTH CENTERS. TO DISCUSS THE CONTRIBUTIONS CATHOLIC HEALTH CENTERS HAVE ON THE UNDERSERVED POPULATIONS
Date: Feb 23, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $915.64
source



American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.