American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

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American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 11.17.14

    The Utility of a PhD

    Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
  • 11.12.14

    The Roosevelts as a political team

    Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: The Internet of the 1930s

    Some predicted radio would be a powerful force for democratizing information and spreading knowledge to a vast population previously separated by geography or income. But the new technology also raised anxieties.

Back to The Data

Trips sponsored by

Ascension Health


Total cost of 7 trips: $7,206.16


Traveler: Alice Weiss (from the office of Max Baucus)
Destination: AUSTIN, TX
Purpose: SITE VISIT TO EVALUATE PRIVATE NON-PROFIT HEALTH CARE SAFETY
Date: Oct 25, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $1,485.00
source

Traveler: Jim Esquea (from the office of Kent Conrad)
Destination: AUSTIN, TEXAS
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL STAFF SITE VISIT OF LOCAL HOSPITALS, COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTERS, AND HEALTH CLINICS
Date: Oct 25, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $907.00
source

Traveler: Valerie Henry (from the office of Greg Walden)
Destination: AUSTIN TX
Purpose: SITE VISIT TO SEE PRIVATE, NON PROFIT HEALTH SYSTEM APPROACH TO TREATING LOW-INCOME AND UNINSURED PATIENTS IN COMMUNITY CLINICS AROUND AUSTIN TX
Date: Oct 25, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $907.00
source

Traveler: Eric Rasmussen (from the office of Michael Crapo)
Destination: NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL SITE VISIT TO EXAMINE EFFORTS TO EXPAND ACCESS TO HEALTH CARE FOR UNINSURED AND LOW-INCOME FAMILIES
Date: Feb 23, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $915.64
source

Traveler: Ari Strauss (from the office of Tim Holden)
Destination: NEW ORLEANS, LA
Purpose: TO PROVIDE AN OPPORTUNITY TO SEE FIRSTHAND THE HEALTHCARE SAFETY NET FOR LOW-INCOME AND UNINSURE FAMILIES
Date: Feb 23, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $1,160.24
source

Traveler: Joye Purser (from the office of Lincoln Davis)
Destination: NEW ORLEANS, LA
Purpose: INTRODUCE CONGRESSIONAL STAFF TO ASCENSION HEALTH AND ITS MODEL AS A HEALTH CARE SAFETY NET PROVIDER
Date: Feb 23, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $915.64
source

Traveler: Robin Goracke (from the office of Collin Peterson)
Destination: NEW ORLEANS
Purpose: TO EXPAND COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTERS TO INCLUDE RELIGIOUS-SPONSORED HEALTH CENTERS. TO DISCUSS THE CONTRIBUTIONS CATHOLIC HEALTH CENTERS HAVE ON THE UNDERSERVED POPULATIONS
Date: Feb 23, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $915.64
source



American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 11.17.14

    The Utility of a PhD

    Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
  • 11.12.14

    The Roosevelts as a political team

    Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: The Internet of the 1930s

    Some predicted radio would be a powerful force for democratizing information and spreading knowledge to a vast population previously separated by geography or income. But the new technology also raised anxieties.