American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

Back to The Data

Trips sponsored by

Viacom Inc


Total cost of 25 trips: $21,490.45


Traveler: Jerrold Nadler (from the office of Jerrold Nadler)
Destination: NYC-MANCHESTER, NEW HAMPSHIRE & RETURN
Purpose: PANELIST ON "TURNING THE TABLES: POLITICIANS GRILL THE MEDIA"
Date: Jan 28, 2000 (2 days)
Expense: $1,033.00
source

Traveler: Eric Schmeltzer (from the office of Jerrold Nadler)
Destination: NYC - MANCHESTER, NEW HAMPSHIRE & RETURN
Purpose: ACCOMPANY MEMBER WHO WAS A PANELIST ON "TURNING THE TABLES: POLITICIANS GRIL THE MEDIA"
Date: Jan 29, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $765.00
source

Traveler: Dennis Kucinich (from the office of Dennis Kucinich)
Destination: BOSTON, MA
Purpose: APPEAR AT A COMEDY FORUM IN MANCHESTER, NEW HAMPSHIRE
Date: Jan 29, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $1,000.00
source

Traveler: Dave Marventano (from the office of W.J. Tauzin)
Destination: NEW YORK CITY, NY
Purpose: FACT FINDING
Date: Sep 8, 2000 (3 days)
Expense: $1,086.61
source

Traveler: W.J. Tauzin (from the office of W.J. Tauzin)
Destination: NEW YORK CITY, NY
Purpose: FACT FINDING
Date: Sep 8, 2000 (3 days)
Expense: $2,327.15
source

Traveler: Joseph Lieberman (from the office of Joseph Lieberman)
Destination: WASHINGTON, D.C.
Purpose: SENATOR WAS GUEST ON SUNDAY TALK SHOW
Date: Feb 11, 2001
Expense: $155.35
source

Traveler: Joseph Lieberman (from the office of Joseph Lieberman)
Destination: WASHINGTON, D.C.
Purpose: SENATOR WAS GUEST ON EARLY SHOW
Date: Mar 29, 2001
Expense: $103.56
source

Traveler: Joseph Lieberman (from the office of Joseph Lieberman)
Destination: WASHINGTON, D.C.
Purpose: SENATOR WAS GUEST ON SUNDAY TALK SHOW
Date: May 27, 2001
Expense: $77.68
source

Traveler: James Maloney (from the office of James Maloney)
Destination: NEW YORK CITY
Purpose: INTERVIEWS
Date: May 31, 2001
Expense: $370.00
source

Traveler: Jean Carnahan (from the office of Jean Carnahan)
Destination: NEW YORK CITY, NEW YORK
Purpose: APPEARANCE ON CBS "THE EARLY SHOW"
Date: Jun 3, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $430.28
source

Traveler: Anthony Wyche (from the office of Jean Carnahan)
Destination: NEW YORK CITY, NEW YORK
Purpose: TO STAFF SENATOR CARNAHAN DURING HER APPEARANCE ON CBS "THE EARLY SHOW"
Date: Jun 3, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $430.28
source

Traveler: W.J. Tauzin (from the office of W.J. Tauzin)
Destination: NYC
Purpose: MEETINGS RE. NATL. OWNERSHIP CAP & PROGRAM ACCESS
Date: Jul 22, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $681.20
source

Traveler: Joseph Lieberman (from the office of Joseph Lieberman)
Destination: WASHINGTON, D.C.
Purpose: SENATOR WAS GUEST ON EARLY SHOW
Date: Sep 25, 2001
Expense: $155.35
source

Traveler: Joseph Biden (from the office of Joseph Biden)
Destination: WASHINGTON, DC
Purpose: APPEARANCE ON CBS NEWS' "THE EARLY SHOE"
Date: Jan 29, 2003
Expense: $103.56
source

Traveler: Joseph Biden (from the office of Joseph Biden)
Destination: FORT MYERS, FL
Purpose: AUTO SERVICE IN FORT MYERS AREA FOR APPEARANCE ON "FACE THE NATION"
Date: Apr 11, 2004
Expense: $330.75
source

Traveler: Henry Bonilla (from the office of Henry Bonilla)
Destination: NY
Purpose: INTERVIEW ON THE DAILY SHOW
Date: Aug 2, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $1,174.59
source

Traveler: Norm Coleman (from the office of Norm Coleman)
Destination: NEW YORK CITY, NEW YORK
Purpose: TO APPEAR ON THE DAILY SHOW WITH JON STEWART
Date: Aug 17, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $688.59
source

Traveler: Kristin Smith (from the office of Conrad Burns)
Destination: LOS ANGELES, CA
Purpose: TO BETTER UNDERSTAND HOW THE DTV TRANSITION WILL AFFECT CONSUMERS IN RURAL MONTANA
Date: Feb 23, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $1,605.40
source

Traveler: Mark Anderson (from the office of Roy Blunt)
Destination: LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA
Purpose: MEETINGS WITH EXECUTIVES OF CBS TELEVISION AND PARAMOUNT STUDIOS TO DISCUSS DECENCEY LEGISLATION AS WELL AS THE TRANSITION TO DIGITAL TELEVISION
Date: Feb 23, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $1,605.40
source

Traveler: Jaylyn Jensen (from the office of Joe Barton)
Destination: LOS ANGELES, CA
Purpose: MEETINGS WITH CBS AND PARAMOUNT EXECUTIVES
Date: Feb 23, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $1,366.40
source

Traveler: Paul Brathwaite (from the office of Mel Watt)
Destination: LOS ANGELES, CA
Purpose: TO VISIT VIACOM'S NEWS DIVISION AND MOVIE STUDIOS AND TO DISCUSS INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY ISSUES FACING THE ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY.
Date: Feb 23, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $1,632.40
source

Traveler: Maria Meier (from the office of Grace Napolitano)
Destination: LOS ANGELES, CA; SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA
Purpose: TO BECOME EDUCATED ON THE POLICY ISSUES AFFECTING THE TELEVISION AND MOVIE PICTURE INDUSTRY GOVERNMENT REGULATIONS ON BROADCAST AND PIRACY
Date: Feb 23, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $1,725.10
source

Traveler: Linda Valter (from the office of Mary Bono)
Destination: PALM SPRINGS - LOS ANGELES
Purpose: IMPACTS ON MOVIE/TV INDUTRY
Date: Feb 24, 2005
Expense: $806.40
source

Traveler: Debbie Wasserman Schultz (from the office of Debbie Wasserman Schultz)
Destination: WASHINGTON, DC
Purpose: PRESS INTERVIEW-LIVE
Date: Mar 26, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $1,421.70
source

Traveler: Daniel O'brien (from the office of Joseph Biden)
Destination: BOSTON MA
Purpose: TO ACCOMPANY SENATOR BIDEN ON A SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT
Date: Jun 19, 2005
Expense: $414.70
source



American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.