American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

Back to The Data

Trips sponsored by

University of Colorado


Total cost of 12 trips: $10,943.24


Traveler: Ernest Hollings (from the office of Ernest Hollings)
Destination: BOULDER, COLORADO
Purpose: SPEECH
Date: Nov 9, 2000 (3 days)
Expense: $1,616.36
source

Traveler: Chris Hessler (from the office of Robert Smith)
Destination: COLORADO
Purpose: COMMITTEE BUSINESS DELIVERING SPEECH
Date: May 22, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $354.00
source

Traveler: Ernest Hollings (from the office of Ernest Hollings)
Destination: BOULDER, COLORADO
Purpose: SPEECH
Date: Oct 4, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $798.00
source

Traveler: Malini Sekhar (from the office of Jeff Bingaman)
Destination: COLORADO
Purpose: 2003 CONGRESSIONAL STAFF FIELD TOUR, ENERGY TOUR
Date: Aug 10, 2003 (7 days)
Expense: $1,350.00
source

Traveler: Sarah Wisner (from the office of Martin Frost)
Destination: DENVER, CO
Purpose: FACT FINDING TRIP TO COLORADO TO LEARN MORE ABOUT RENEWABLE ENERGY ISSUES
Date: Aug 16, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $570.00
source

Traveler: F Jerome Hinkle (from the office of Byron Dorgan)
Destination: BOULDER, CO
Purpose: TO EXAMINE WESTERN ENERGY ISSUES AND REVIEW NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT PROJECTS, VISIT NEW TECH PROJECTS AS RELATES TO INCREASING OPERATING EFFICIENCIES & REDUCING ENV. IMPACT
Date: Aug 3, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $874.00
source

Traveler: Christal Sheppard (from the office of Bart Gordon)
Destination: DENVER, COLORADO
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN THE SECOND-ANNUAL CONGRESSIONAL STAFF FIELD TOUR. THE CONGRESSIONAL STAFF LOOKED FIRST-HAND AT WESTERN ENERGY ISSUES. I ALSO VISITED SEVERAL SITES OF INTEREST ON COLORADO'S FRONT RANGE
Date: Aug 3, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $952.44
source

Traveler: Marsha Shasteen (from the office of Bart Gordon)
Destination: DENVER, COLORADO
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN THE SECOND-ANNUAL CONGRESSIONAL STAFF FIELD TOUR. THE CONGRESSIONAL STAFF LOOKED FIRST-HAND AT WESTERN ENERGY ISSUES. I ALSO VISITED SEVERAL SITES OF INTEREST ON COLORADO'S FRONT RANGE
Date: Aug 3, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $952.44
source

Traveler: Mitchell Butler (from the office of Scott Mcinnis)
Destination: DENVER, CO
Purpose: RENEWABLE ENERGY FIELD TOUR. (TOURS OF ENERGY FACILITIES AND LECTURES)
Date: Aug 3, 2004 (5 days)
Expense: $681.00
source

Traveler: Steve Scango (from the office of Michael Castle)
Destination: BOULDER, COLORADO
Purpose: STEVE ATTENDED THE LAW SCHOOL LEGISLATIVE INSTITUTE ON EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM FOR STAFFERS FROM CAPITOL HILL. THE GOAL IS TO EDUCATE FEDERAL LEGISLATORS ABOUT WESTERN RESOURCES AND ENERGY ISSUES
Date: Aug 3, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $1,045.00
source

Traveler: Shane Schulz (from the office of John Salazar)
Destination: DENVER
Purpose: TO REVIEW THE ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT ON THE GROUND. TO LISTEN TO INDIVIDUAL & GROUPS TO HEAR THEIR CONCERNS IN REGARDS TO WHAT CHANGES NEED TO HAPPEN TO MAKE THE LAW MORE EFFECTIVE
Date: Aug 16, 2005 (5 days)
Expense: $900.00
source

Traveler: Jodanna Haskins (from the office of Mark Udall)
Destination: DENVER, CO
Purpose: ENDANGERED SPECIES LEGISLATIVE TOUR-TO DISCUSS LEARN ABOUT THE PURPOSE AND IMPORTANCE OF THE ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT AND ITS IMPACT ON STATES
Date: Aug 16, 2005 (7 days)
Expense: $850.00
source



American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.