American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.14

    Variation is key to deeper learning

    Humans obviously learn a lot of things through trial-and-error. A level of "desirable difficulty" built into a learning and exam process appears to boost the overall retention of new skills or knowledge.
  • 08.19.14

    Learning to love tests

    If there's consensus on anything in education, it's this: Tests are awful. But maybe we've been thinking about tests all wrong. Research shows that tests can actually be powerful tools for learning -- but only if teachers use them right.
  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.18.14

    This is your brain on language

    For decades psychologists cautioned against raising children bilingual. They warned parents and teachers that learning a second language as a child was bad for brain development. But recent studies have found exactly the opposite.

American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.14

    Variation is key to deeper learning

    Humans obviously learn a lot of things through trial-and-error. A level of "desirable difficulty" built into a learning and exam process appears to boost the overall retention of new skills or knowledge.
  • 08.19.14

    Learning to love tests

    If there's consensus on anything in education, it's this: Tests are awful. But maybe we've been thinking about tests all wrong. Research shows that tests can actually be powerful tools for learning -- but only if teachers use them right.
  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.18.14

    This is your brain on language

    For decades psychologists cautioned against raising children bilingual. They warned parents and teachers that learning a second language as a child was bad for brain development. But recent studies have found exactly the opposite.

Back to The Data

Trips sponsored by

University of Colorado


Total cost of 12 trips: $10,943.24


Traveler: Ernest Hollings (from the office of Ernest Hollings)
Destination: BOULDER, COLORADO
Purpose: SPEECH
Date: Nov 9, 2000 (3 days)
Expense: $1,616.36
source

Traveler: Chris Hessler (from the office of Robert Smith)
Destination: COLORADO
Purpose: COMMITTEE BUSINESS DELIVERING SPEECH
Date: May 22, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $354.00
source

Traveler: Ernest Hollings (from the office of Ernest Hollings)
Destination: BOULDER, COLORADO
Purpose: SPEECH
Date: Oct 4, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $798.00
source

Traveler: Malini Sekhar (from the office of Jeff Bingaman)
Destination: COLORADO
Purpose: 2003 CONGRESSIONAL STAFF FIELD TOUR, ENERGY TOUR
Date: Aug 10, 2003 (7 days)
Expense: $1,350.00
source

Traveler: Sarah Wisner (from the office of Martin Frost)
Destination: DENVER, CO
Purpose: FACT FINDING TRIP TO COLORADO TO LEARN MORE ABOUT RENEWABLE ENERGY ISSUES
Date: Aug 16, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $570.00
source

Traveler: F Jerome Hinkle (from the office of Byron Dorgan)
Destination: BOULDER, CO
Purpose: TO EXAMINE WESTERN ENERGY ISSUES AND REVIEW NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT PROJECTS, VISIT NEW TECH PROJECTS AS RELATES TO INCREASING OPERATING EFFICIENCIES & REDUCING ENV. IMPACT
Date: Aug 3, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $874.00
source

Traveler: Christal Sheppard (from the office of Bart Gordon)
Destination: DENVER, COLORADO
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN THE SECOND-ANNUAL CONGRESSIONAL STAFF FIELD TOUR. THE CONGRESSIONAL STAFF LOOKED FIRST-HAND AT WESTERN ENERGY ISSUES. I ALSO VISITED SEVERAL SITES OF INTEREST ON COLORADO'S FRONT RANGE
Date: Aug 3, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $952.44
source

Traveler: Marsha Shasteen (from the office of Bart Gordon)
Destination: DENVER, COLORADO
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN THE SECOND-ANNUAL CONGRESSIONAL STAFF FIELD TOUR. THE CONGRESSIONAL STAFF LOOKED FIRST-HAND AT WESTERN ENERGY ISSUES. I ALSO VISITED SEVERAL SITES OF INTEREST ON COLORADO'S FRONT RANGE
Date: Aug 3, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $952.44
source

Traveler: Mitchell Butler (from the office of Scott Mcinnis)
Destination: DENVER, CO
Purpose: RENEWABLE ENERGY FIELD TOUR. (TOURS OF ENERGY FACILITIES AND LECTURES)
Date: Aug 3, 2004 (5 days)
Expense: $681.00
source

Traveler: Steve Scango (from the office of Michael Castle)
Destination: BOULDER, COLORADO
Purpose: STEVE ATTENDED THE LAW SCHOOL LEGISLATIVE INSTITUTE ON EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM FOR STAFFERS FROM CAPITOL HILL. THE GOAL IS TO EDUCATE FEDERAL LEGISLATORS ABOUT WESTERN RESOURCES AND ENERGY ISSUES
Date: Aug 3, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $1,045.00
source

Traveler: Shane Schulz (from the office of John Salazar)
Destination: DENVER
Purpose: TO REVIEW THE ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT ON THE GROUND. TO LISTEN TO INDIVIDUAL & GROUPS TO HEAR THEIR CONCERNS IN REGARDS TO WHAT CHANGES NEED TO HAPPEN TO MAKE THE LAW MORE EFFECTIVE
Date: Aug 16, 2005 (5 days)
Expense: $900.00
source

Traveler: Jodanna Haskins (from the office of Mark Udall)
Destination: DENVER, CO
Purpose: ENDANGERED SPECIES LEGISLATIVE TOUR-TO DISCUSS LEARN ABOUT THE PURPOSE AND IMPORTANCE OF THE ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT AND ITS IMPACT ON STATES
Date: Aug 16, 2005 (7 days)
Expense: $850.00
source



American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.14

    Variation is key to deeper learning

    Humans obviously learn a lot of things through trial-and-error. A level of "desirable difficulty" built into a learning and exam process appears to boost the overall retention of new skills or knowledge.
  • 08.19.14

    Learning to love tests

    If there's consensus on anything in education, it's this: Tests are awful. But maybe we've been thinking about tests all wrong. Research shows that tests can actually be powerful tools for learning -- but only if teachers use them right.
  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.18.14

    This is your brain on language

    For decades psychologists cautioned against raising children bilingual. They warned parents and teachers that learning a second language as a child was bad for brain development. But recent studies have found exactly the opposite.