American RadioWorks |
Image: Sweet Briar College web site

Sweet Briar Returns

Sweet Briar College was about to close after struggling with dwindling enrollment and other problems. An alumni group raised more than 20 million dollars in pledges to keep the doors open, but the school's survival is still deeply in doubt.

Recent Posts

  • 07.15.15

    The Future of Historically Black Colleges

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities proliferated throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when many white schools refused to admit African Americans, especially in the South. Our guest this week feels HBCUs still serve a crucial role in higher education.
  • 07.07.15

    Talking About Race in Schools

    Over the past year, race relations have dominated the news cycle. This can bring up difficult questions, especially for parents and teachers. Our guest Yolanda Moses says Americans need to find more ways to talk about race in schools.
  • 07.02.15

    Minorities and Special Ed

    For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.
  • 06.23.15

    Learning from Video Games

    A lot of parents worry about whether their kids' video game habits are harmful - especially when gaming gets in the way of homework or reading. But writer Greg Toppo says gaming can be a great way to learn.

American RadioWorks |
Image: Sweet Briar College web site

Sweet Briar Returns

Sweet Briar College was about to close after struggling with dwindling enrollment and other problems. An alumni group raised more than 20 million dollars in pledges to keep the doors open, but the school's survival is still deeply in doubt.

Recent Posts

  • 07.15.15

    The Future of Historically Black Colleges

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities proliferated throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when many white schools refused to admit African Americans, especially in the South. Our guest this week feels HBCUs still serve a crucial role in higher education.
  • 07.07.15

    Talking About Race in Schools

    Over the past year, race relations have dominated the news cycle. This can bring up difficult questions, especially for parents and teachers. Our guest Yolanda Moses says Americans need to find more ways to talk about race in schools.
  • 07.02.15

    Minorities and Special Ed

    For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.
  • 06.23.15

    Learning from Video Games

    A lot of parents worry about whether their kids' video game habits are harmful - especially when gaming gets in the way of homework or reading. But writer Greg Toppo says gaming can be a great way to learn.

Back to The Data

Trips sponsored by

University of Colorado


Total cost of 12 trips: $10,943.24


Traveler: Ernest Hollings (from the office of Ernest Hollings)
Destination: BOULDER, COLORADO
Purpose: SPEECH
Date: Nov 9, 2000 (3 days)
Expense: $1,616.36
source

Traveler: Chris Hessler (from the office of Robert Smith)
Destination: COLORADO
Purpose: COMMITTEE BUSINESS DELIVERING SPEECH
Date: May 22, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $354.00
source

Traveler: Ernest Hollings (from the office of Ernest Hollings)
Destination: BOULDER, COLORADO
Purpose: SPEECH
Date: Oct 4, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $798.00
source

Traveler: Malini Sekhar (from the office of Jeff Bingaman)
Destination: COLORADO
Purpose: 2003 CONGRESSIONAL STAFF FIELD TOUR, ENERGY TOUR
Date: Aug 10, 2003 (7 days)
Expense: $1,350.00
source

Traveler: Sarah Wisner (from the office of Martin Frost)
Destination: DENVER, CO
Purpose: FACT FINDING TRIP TO COLORADO TO LEARN MORE ABOUT RENEWABLE ENERGY ISSUES
Date: Aug 16, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $570.00
source

Traveler: F Jerome Hinkle (from the office of Byron Dorgan)
Destination: BOULDER, CO
Purpose: TO EXAMINE WESTERN ENERGY ISSUES AND REVIEW NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT PROJECTS, VISIT NEW TECH PROJECTS AS RELATES TO INCREASING OPERATING EFFICIENCIES & REDUCING ENV. IMPACT
Date: Aug 3, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $874.00
source

Traveler: Christal Sheppard (from the office of Bart Gordon)
Destination: DENVER, COLORADO
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN THE SECOND-ANNUAL CONGRESSIONAL STAFF FIELD TOUR. THE CONGRESSIONAL STAFF LOOKED FIRST-HAND AT WESTERN ENERGY ISSUES. I ALSO VISITED SEVERAL SITES OF INTEREST ON COLORADO'S FRONT RANGE
Date: Aug 3, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $952.44
source

Traveler: Marsha Shasteen (from the office of Bart Gordon)
Destination: DENVER, COLORADO
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN THE SECOND-ANNUAL CONGRESSIONAL STAFF FIELD TOUR. THE CONGRESSIONAL STAFF LOOKED FIRST-HAND AT WESTERN ENERGY ISSUES. I ALSO VISITED SEVERAL SITES OF INTEREST ON COLORADO'S FRONT RANGE
Date: Aug 3, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $952.44
source

Traveler: Mitchell Butler (from the office of Scott Mcinnis)
Destination: DENVER, CO
Purpose: RENEWABLE ENERGY FIELD TOUR. (TOURS OF ENERGY FACILITIES AND LECTURES)
Date: Aug 3, 2004 (5 days)
Expense: $681.00
source

Traveler: Steve Scango (from the office of Michael Castle)
Destination: BOULDER, COLORADO
Purpose: STEVE ATTENDED THE LAW SCHOOL LEGISLATIVE INSTITUTE ON EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM FOR STAFFERS FROM CAPITOL HILL. THE GOAL IS TO EDUCATE FEDERAL LEGISLATORS ABOUT WESTERN RESOURCES AND ENERGY ISSUES
Date: Aug 3, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $1,045.00
source

Traveler: Shane Schulz (from the office of John Salazar)
Destination: DENVER
Purpose: TO REVIEW THE ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT ON THE GROUND. TO LISTEN TO INDIVIDUAL & GROUPS TO HEAR THEIR CONCERNS IN REGARDS TO WHAT CHANGES NEED TO HAPPEN TO MAKE THE LAW MORE EFFECTIVE
Date: Aug 16, 2005 (5 days)
Expense: $900.00
source

Traveler: Jodanna Haskins (from the office of Mark Udall)
Destination: DENVER, CO
Purpose: ENDANGERED SPECIES LEGISLATIVE TOUR-TO DISCUSS LEARN ABOUT THE PURPOSE AND IMPORTANCE OF THE ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT AND ITS IMPACT ON STATES
Date: Aug 16, 2005 (7 days)
Expense: $850.00
source



American RadioWorks |
Image: Sweet Briar College web site

Sweet Briar Returns

Sweet Briar College was about to close after struggling with dwindling enrollment and other problems. An alumni group raised more than 20 million dollars in pledges to keep the doors open, but the school's survival is still deeply in doubt.

Recent Posts

  • 07.15.15

    The Future of Historically Black Colleges

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities proliferated throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when many white schools refused to admit African Americans, especially in the South. Our guest this week feels HBCUs still serve a crucial role in higher education.
  • 07.07.15

    Talking About Race in Schools

    Over the past year, race relations have dominated the news cycle. This can bring up difficult questions, especially for parents and teachers. Our guest Yolanda Moses says Americans need to find more ways to talk about race in schools.
  • 07.02.15

    Minorities and Special Ed

    For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.
  • 06.23.15

    Learning from Video Games

    A lot of parents worry about whether their kids' video game habits are harmful - especially when gaming gets in the way of homework or reading. But writer Greg Toppo says gaming can be a great way to learn.