American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.

Back to The Data

Trips sponsored by

New York University


Total cost of 14 trips: $8,688.59


Traveler: John Harrington (from the office of Bill Archer)
Destination: NEW YORK, NY
Purpose: PARTICIPATION IN SEMINAR ON SUBPART F TAX RULES
Date: Feb 11, 2000
Expense: $227.00
source

Traveler: Diana Degette (from the office of Diana Degette)
Destination: NEW YORK, NEW YORK
Purpose: SPEAK AT SYMPOSIUM ON THE LEGAL ISSUES OF THE CLINTON IMPEACHMENT
Date: May 19, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $1,032.00
source

Traveler: James Oberstar (from the office of James Oberstar)
Destination: NEW YORK CITY, NY
Purpose: SPEECH: FUTURE OF AVIATION IN THE NY/NJ METRO REG
Date: Jun 19, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $427.80
source

Traveler: Joseph Lieberman (from the office of Joseph Lieberman)
Destination: NEW YORK, NY
Purpose: SENATOR WAS KEYNOTE SPEAKER AT NYU LAW SCHOOL GRADUATION
Date: May 11, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $898.24
source

Traveler: Susan Jensen (from the office of F. James Sensenbrenner)
Destination: NEW YORK, NEW YORK
Purpose: EDUCATION
Date: Aug 26, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $650.00
source

Traveler: Stephanie Moore (from the office of F. James Sensenbrenner)
Destination: NEW YORK, NY
Purpose: TO ATTEND THE ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON BANKRUPTCY
Date: Aug 27, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $650.00
source

Traveler: Tara Zimmerman (from the office of William Thomas)
Destination: NYU GOVERNMENT SEMINAR
Purpose: INT'L TAX FORUM
Date: Feb 27, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $368.00
source

Traveler: Harold Ford (from the office of Harold Ford)
Destination: ORLANDO, FL-NEW YORK, NY-WASHINGTON, D.C.
Purpose: SPEECH TO GRADUATING CLASS ON NATIONAL POLICY AGENDA
Date: May 12, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $815.00
source

Traveler: Brian Mergharo (from the office of William Thomas)
Destination: NEW YORK UNIVERSITY SPEECH
Purpose: SPEECH/ROUNDTABLE ON BOOK/MP DIFFERENCES
Date: May 18, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $362.92
source

Traveler: Lauralee Matthews (from the office of William Thomas)
Destination: NYU TAX CONFERENCE FOR GOV'T
Purpose: TAX CONFERENCE
Date: Feb 5, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $497.53
source

Traveler: David Noren (from the office of William Thomas)
Destination: NYC
Purpose: NYU TAX SEMINAR FOR GOV'T
Date: Feb 5, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $450.33
source

Traveler: E Ray Beeman (from the office of William Thomas)
Destination:
Purpose: NYU TAX POLICY SEMINAR FOR GOVERNMENT
Date: Feb 5, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $579.29
source

Traveler: Frank Jannuzi (from the office of Joseph Biden)
Destination: NEW YORK CITY
Purpose: TO ATTEND A CONFERENCE ON NORTH KOREA
Date: Oct 22, 2004
Expense: $280.00
source

Traveler: Neil Macbride (from the office of Joseph Biden)
Destination: FLORENCE, ITALY
Purpose: PARTICIPANT IN ANNUAL TERRORISM CONFERENCE SPONSORED BY NEW YORK UNIVERSITY'S CENTER ON LAW AND SECURITY, "PROSECUTING TERRORISM: THE GLOBAL CHALLENGE"
Date: May 25, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $1,450.48
source



American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.