American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.

Back to The Data

Trips sponsored by

Teamsters Union


Total cost of 16 trips: $33,368.37


Traveler: Nate Woodward (from the office of Maxine Waters)
Destination: ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI
Purpose: DISCUSSION OF LABOR ISSUES. TO ACCOMPANY AND PROVIDE SECURITY FOR REP. WATERS
Date: Sep 11, 1999 (2 days)
Expense: $360.00
source

Traveler: Maxine Waters (from the office of Maxine Waters)
Destination: BALTIMORE - ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI
Purpose: DISCUSSION ON LABOR ISSUES
Date: Sep 11, 1999 (2 days)
Expense: $355.19
source

Traveler: David Bonior (from the office of David Bonior)
Destination: DETROIT
Purpose:
Date: Jul 17, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $1,100.00
source

Traveler: Loretta Sanchez (from the office of Loretta Sanchez)
Destination: LAX - LAS VEGAS - WASHINGTON DC
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT
Date: Jun 24, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $478.00
source

Traveler: Thomas Daschle (from the office of Thomas Daschle)
Destination: LAS VEGAS, NV
Purpose: KEYNOTE ADDRESS
Date: Jun 25, 2001
Expense: $1,839.00
source

Traveler: Jessica Roach (from the office of Marcy Kaptur)
Destination: MEXICO CITY - EL PASO
Purpose: CO-DEL PLANNING
Date: Oct 29, 2003 (5 days)
Expense: $2,075.00
source

Traveler: Bernard Sanders (from the office of Bernard Sanders)
Destination: BURLINGTON, VT-WASHINGTON, D.C.-EL PASO, TX-JUAREZ MEXICO-MEXICO CITY- WASHINGTON, D.C.
Purpose: TO STUDY EFFECTS OF TRADE POLICY AND ATTENDED MEETINGS WITH OFFICIALS AND A NUMBER OF COMMUNITY LEADERS.
Date: Nov 13, 2003 (5 days)
Expense: $5,822.57
source

Traveler: Raul Grijalva (from the office of Raul Grijalva)
Destination: CIUDAD JUAREZ, MEX
Purpose: STUDY THE EFFECT OF NAFTA AND OTHER INTERNATIONAL TRADE AGREEMENTS ON THE US-MEXICO BORDER
Date: Nov 13, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $1,523.16
source

Traveler: Janice Schakowsky (from the office of Janice Schakowsky)
Destination: LAS VEGAS-EL PASO, TX-MEXICO CITY, MEXICO-CHICAGO, IL
Purpose: NAFTA TOUR
Date: Nov 13, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $3,819.00
source

Traveler: John Haseley (from the office of Ted Strickland)
Destination: El Paso, TX/MEXICO CITY/El Paso, TX
Purpose: TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE AFFECTS OF NAFTA.
Date: Nov 13, 2003 (4 days)
Expense: $2,762.28
source

Traveler: Ted Strickland (from the office of Ted Strickland)
Destination: El Paso, TXMEXICO CITY/El Paso, TX
Purpose: TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE EFFECTS OF NAFTA.
Date: Nov 13, 2003 (4 days)
Expense: $2,762.28
source

Traveler: Jessica Roach (from the office of Marcy Kaptur)
Destination: EL PASO - MEXICO CITY
Purpose: CO-DEL TO STUDY EFFECTS OF NAFTA
Date: Nov 13, 2003 (5 days)
Expense: $3,125.00
source

Traveler: Marcy Kaptur (from the office of Marcy Kaptur)
Destination: EL PASO, TEXAS AND MEXICO
Purpose: TO STUDY EFFECTS OF NAFTA
Date: Nov 13, 2003 (5 days)
Expense: $3,125.00
source

Traveler: Jerry Costello (from the office of Jerry Costello)
Destination: ST. LOUIS-CIUDAD JUAREZ, MEXICO-MEXICO CITY, MEXICO-WASHINGTON, D.C.
Purpose: FACT FINDING TRIP ON THE EFFECTS OF NAFTA ON ITS 10TH ANNIVERSARY
Date: Nov 14, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $2,284.52
source

Traveler: Linda Sanchez (from the office of Linda Sanchez)
Destination: ATLANTA, GA-SAN SALVADOR, EL SALVADOR
Purpose: TO MONITOR THE STATUS OF THE SOTO MURDER INVESTIGATION
Date: Nov 29, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $1,060.02
source

Traveler: George Miller (from the office of George Miller)
Destination: SAN FRANCISCO-SAN DIEGO-WASHINGTON, DC
Purpose: FEATURED SPEAKER AT TEAMSTERS' ANNUAL MEETING RE SOCIAL SECURITY & MULTI-EMPLOYER BENEFIT PLANS
Date: Mar 13, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $877.35
source



American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.