American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

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American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 11.17.14

    The Utility of a PhD

    Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
  • 11.12.14

    The Roosevelts as a political team

    Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: The Internet of the 1930s

    Some predicted radio would be a powerful force for democratizing information and spreading knowledge to a vast population previously separated by geography or income. But the new technology also raised anxieties.

Back to The Data

Trips sponsored by

Teamsters Union


Total cost of 16 trips: $33,368.37


Traveler: Nate Woodward (from the office of Maxine Waters)
Destination: ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI
Purpose: DISCUSSION OF LABOR ISSUES. TO ACCOMPANY AND PROVIDE SECURITY FOR REP. WATERS
Date: Sep 11, 1999 (2 days)
Expense: $360.00
source

Traveler: Maxine Waters (from the office of Maxine Waters)
Destination: BALTIMORE - ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI
Purpose: DISCUSSION ON LABOR ISSUES
Date: Sep 11, 1999 (2 days)
Expense: $355.19
source

Traveler: David Bonior (from the office of David Bonior)
Destination: DETROIT
Purpose:
Date: Jul 17, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $1,100.00
source

Traveler: Loretta Sanchez (from the office of Loretta Sanchez)
Destination: LAX - LAS VEGAS - WASHINGTON DC
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT
Date: Jun 24, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $478.00
source

Traveler: Thomas Daschle (from the office of Thomas Daschle)
Destination: LAS VEGAS, NV
Purpose: KEYNOTE ADDRESS
Date: Jun 25, 2001
Expense: $1,839.00
source

Traveler: Jessica Roach (from the office of Marcy Kaptur)
Destination: MEXICO CITY - EL PASO
Purpose: CO-DEL PLANNING
Date: Oct 29, 2003 (5 days)
Expense: $2,075.00
source

Traveler: Bernard Sanders (from the office of Bernard Sanders)
Destination: BURLINGTON, VT-WASHINGTON, D.C.-EL PASO, TX-JUAREZ MEXICO-MEXICO CITY- WASHINGTON, D.C.
Purpose: TO STUDY EFFECTS OF TRADE POLICY AND ATTENDED MEETINGS WITH OFFICIALS AND A NUMBER OF COMMUNITY LEADERS.
Date: Nov 13, 2003 (5 days)
Expense: $5,822.57
source

Traveler: Raul Grijalva (from the office of Raul Grijalva)
Destination: CIUDAD JUAREZ, MEX
Purpose: STUDY THE EFFECT OF NAFTA AND OTHER INTERNATIONAL TRADE AGREEMENTS ON THE US-MEXICO BORDER
Date: Nov 13, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $1,523.16
source

Traveler: Janice Schakowsky (from the office of Janice Schakowsky)
Destination: LAS VEGAS-EL PASO, TX-MEXICO CITY, MEXICO-CHICAGO, IL
Purpose: NAFTA TOUR
Date: Nov 13, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $3,819.00
source

Traveler: John Haseley (from the office of Ted Strickland)
Destination: El Paso, TX/MEXICO CITY/El Paso, TX
Purpose: TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE AFFECTS OF NAFTA.
Date: Nov 13, 2003 (4 days)
Expense: $2,762.28
source

Traveler: Ted Strickland (from the office of Ted Strickland)
Destination: El Paso, TXMEXICO CITY/El Paso, TX
Purpose: TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE EFFECTS OF NAFTA.
Date: Nov 13, 2003 (4 days)
Expense: $2,762.28
source

Traveler: Jessica Roach (from the office of Marcy Kaptur)
Destination: EL PASO - MEXICO CITY
Purpose: CO-DEL TO STUDY EFFECTS OF NAFTA
Date: Nov 13, 2003 (5 days)
Expense: $3,125.00
source

Traveler: Marcy Kaptur (from the office of Marcy Kaptur)
Destination: EL PASO, TEXAS AND MEXICO
Purpose: TO STUDY EFFECTS OF NAFTA
Date: Nov 13, 2003 (5 days)
Expense: $3,125.00
source

Traveler: Jerry Costello (from the office of Jerry Costello)
Destination: ST. LOUIS-CIUDAD JUAREZ, MEXICO-MEXICO CITY, MEXICO-WASHINGTON, D.C.
Purpose: FACT FINDING TRIP ON THE EFFECTS OF NAFTA ON ITS 10TH ANNIVERSARY
Date: Nov 14, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $2,284.52
source

Traveler: Linda Sanchez (from the office of Linda Sanchez)
Destination: ATLANTA, GA-SAN SALVADOR, EL SALVADOR
Purpose: TO MONITOR THE STATUS OF THE SOTO MURDER INVESTIGATION
Date: Nov 29, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $1,060.02
source

Traveler: George Miller (from the office of George Miller)
Destination: SAN FRANCISCO-SAN DIEGO-WASHINGTON, DC
Purpose: FEATURED SPEAKER AT TEAMSTERS' ANNUAL MEETING RE SOCIAL SECURITY & MULTI-EMPLOYER BENEFIT PLANS
Date: Mar 13, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $877.35
source



American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 11.17.14

    The Utility of a PhD

    Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
  • 11.12.14

    The Roosevelts as a political team

    Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: The Internet of the 1930s

    Some predicted radio would be a powerful force for democratizing information and spreading knowledge to a vast population previously separated by geography or income. But the new technology also raised anxieties.