American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball

American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball

Back to The Data

Trips sponsored by

Council of Federal Home Loan Banks


Total cost of 21 trips: $21,736.78


Traveler: Shana Jones (from the office of Bob Riley)
Destination: SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Purpose: FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK SEMINAR
Date: Aug 30, 2000 (2 days)
Expense: $1,193.02
source

Traveler: Adam Magary (from the office of Donald Manzullo)
Destination: SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Purpose: BANKING CONFERENCE AND TOUR OF FEDERAL HOUSING PROGRAM
Date: Aug 30, 2000 (2 days)
Expense: $811.14
source

Traveler: Michael Ferrell (from the office of Rick Hill)
Destination: SEATTLE, WA
Purpose: FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK CONFERENCE
Date: Aug 30, 2000 (3 days)
Expense: $987.26
source

Traveler: Rodney Pulliam (from the office of Stephanie Tubbs Jones)
Destination: DC NATIONAL-SEATTLE
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL STAFF SEMINAR
Date: Aug 30, 2000 (3 days)
Expense: $853.20
source

Traveler: Todd Harper (from the office of Paul Kanjorski)
Destination: WASHINGTON, DC TO SEATTLE, WA
Purpose: SPEAK AT & PARTICIPATE IN CONGRESSIONAL STAFF SEMINAR
Date: Aug 30, 2000 (3 days)
Expense: $1,546.40
source

Traveler: Sarah Dumont (from the office of Bill Mccollum)
Destination: SEATTLE
Purpose: LEARN ABOUT THE FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK SYSTEM
Date: Aug 31, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $1,272.14
source

Traveler: Becky Fast (from the office of Dennis Moore)
Destination: DENVER, CO
Purpose: LEARN ABOUT AFFORDABLE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT
Date: May 31, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $1,015.04
source

Traveler: Jeff Forrest (from the office of Michael Castle)
Destination: BOSTON, MA
Purpose: SEMINAR ON FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK PUBLIC POLICY ISSUES
Date: Aug 29, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $920.00
source

Traveler: Alfred Garesche (from the office of Michael Oxley)
Destination: BOSTON, MA
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL
Date: Aug 29, 2001 (5 days)
Expense: $957.98
source

Traveler: Todd Harper (from the office of Paul Kanjorski)
Destination: WASHINGTON, DC TO BOSTON, MA
Purpose: SPEAKER AT AND PARTICIPANT IN FHLBANK CONGRESSIONAL CONFERENCE
Date: Aug 29, 2001 (3 days)
Expense: $1,021.90
source

Traveler: Nigel De Caster (from the office of Larry Craig)
Destination: BOSTON, MA
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL STAFF SEMINAR ON FEDERAL HOUSING PROGRAMS
Date: Aug 30, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $1,010.26
source

Traveler: Amy Porter (from the office of Edward Royce)
Destination:
Purpose: TO ATTEND A CONFERENCE ON THE FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK SYSTEM
Date: Aug 30, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $744.04
source

Traveler: Kevin Casey (from the office of Joseph Crowley)
Destination: BOS
Purpose: EDUCATION ON FED HOME LOAN BANK
Date: Aug 30, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $1,215.63
source

Traveler: Carter Mcdowell (from the office of Michael Oxley)
Destination: DROVE FROM HOME IN VA, TO BOSTON (THROUGH NYC)
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL STAFF SEMINAR 2001
Date: Aug 30, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $1,032.75
source

Traveler: Scott Keefer (from the office of Harold Ford)
Destination: BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS
Purpose: INFORMATIONAL - EDUCATIONAL
Date: Aug 30, 2001 (3 days)
Expense: $957.98
source

Traveler: Kerry Mcginn (from the office of Stephen Lynch)
Destination: BOSTON, MA
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL/FACT-FINDING
Date: Aug 27, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $1,179.22
source

Traveler: Chris Goldfarb (from the office of Julia Carson)
Destination:
Purpose: FHLB LEGISLATIVE WORKSHOP
Date: Jul 31, 2004
Expense: $136.72
source

Traveler: John Mcdonald (from the office of Peter Hoekstra)
Destination: INDIANAPOLIS, IN
Purpose: FHLBI LEGISLATIVE WORKSHOP
Date: Aug 5, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $1,311.57
source

Traveler: Debra Marshall (from the office of Fred Upton)
Destination: INDIANAPOLIS IN
Purpose: TO LEARN ABOUT HOUSING PROGRAMS FOR LOW INCOME & DISADVENTAGED
Date: Aug 5, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $658.57
source

Traveler: Janet Worthington (from the office of Doug Ose)
Destination: WASHINGTON, DC-SEATTLE, VA
Purpose: STUDY, EXAMINE AND LEARN ABOUT LEGISLATION ON THE RESTRUCTURING OF THE GSE'S AS WELL AS BANKING, HOUSING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT ISSUES
Date: Aug 11, 2004 (5 days)
Expense: $1,601.96
source

Traveler: Alfred Garesche (from the office of Elizabeth Dole)
Destination: ORLANDO, FL
Purpose: WINTER CONGRESSIONAL STAFF BRIEFING
Date: Jan 8, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $1,310.00
source



American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball