American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball

American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball

Back to The Data

Trips sponsored by

Association for Competitive Technology


Total cost of 22 trips: $14,184.66


Traveler: Jeff Palmore (from the office of Edward Schrock)
Destination: CHICAGO, IL
Purpose: FACT-FINDING/EDUCATIONAL
Date: Aug 28, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $543.78
source

Traveler: Scott Parman (from the office of Tom Cole)
Destination: CHICAGO O'HARE
Purpose: TOUR ORBITZ HQ AND LEARN ABOUT THEIR TELECOMMUNICATION POLICY STANCES
Date: Aug 28, 2003 (4 days)
Expense: $569.94
source

Traveler: Amy Cook (from the office of Michael Rogers)
Destination: CHICAGO, IL
Purpose: TOUR/DISCUSSION W/ORBITZ COMPANY
Date: Aug 28, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $569.94
source

Traveler: Philip Schuyler (from the office of John Tanner)
Destination: CAMBRIDGE MD
Purpose: ATTEND A SUMMIT FOCUSING ON THE ROLE OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS IN THE TECHNOLOGY SECTOR AND TO DISCUSS HOW THE CURRENT IP REGIME IS WORKING AND WAYS IT CAN BE
Date: Mar 25, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $701.00
source

Traveler: Paul Unger (from the office of George Allen)
Destination: CHESAPEAKE, MD
Purpose: PARTICIPATE IN A SUMMIT FOCUSING ON THE ROLE OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS IN THE TECHNOLOGY SECTOR. THE GOAL OF THE SUMMIT IS TO BRING DIVERSE VIEWS ON THE CURRENT INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY REGIME AND HOW IT CAN BE IMPROVED
Date: Apr 22, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $399.00
source

Traveler: Spivey Paup (from the office of John Carter)
Destination: CAMBRIDGE, MARYLAND
Purpose: WEEKEND SUMMIT/CONFERENCE FOCUSING ON THE TOPIC OF THE ROLE OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS IN THE TECHNOLOGY SECTOR
Date: Apr 22, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $758.00
source

Traveler: Bob Sakaniwa (from the office of Michael Honda)
Destination: CAMBRIDGE, MD
Purpose: ACT HOSTED A SUMMIT FOCUSING ON THE ROLE OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY (IP) RIGHTS IN THE TECHNOLOGY SECTOR AND TO DISCUSS WHETHER THE SYSTEM IS WORKING FOR THE TECH INDUSTRY
Date: Apr 22, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $850.00
source

Traveler: Richard Beutel (from the office of Donald Manzullo)
Destination: ALEXANDRIA, VA-EASTON, MD
Purpose: TO ATTEND THE INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND TECHNOLOGY SUMMIT. TO PARTICIPATE IN PANEL SESSIONS REGARDING IPR AND INNOVATION POLICY FOR SME'S
Date: Apr 22, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $644.00
source

Traveler: Erin Berry (from the office of John Hostettler)
Destination: CAMBRIDGE, MD
Purpose: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY & TECHNOLOGY SUMMIT
Date: Apr 22, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $758.00
source

Traveler: Jason Scism (from the office of Darrell Issa)
Destination: WASHINGTON, DC; CAMBRIDGE, MARYLAND; ARLINGTON, VA
Purpose: SUMMIT ON THE ROLE OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY IN THE TECHNOLOGY SECTOR
Date: Apr 22, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $644.00
source

Traveler: Christal Sheppard (from the office of Bart Gordon)
Destination: CAMBRIDGE, MD
Purpose: TO ATTEND SUMMIT FOCUSING ON THE ROLD OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS IN THE TECHNOLOGY SECTOR
Date: Apr 22, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $644.00
source

Traveler: David Cavicke (from the office of Joe Barton)
Destination: CAMBRIDGE, MD
Purpose: ATTEND CONFERENCE, EDUCATION: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY
Date: Apr 22, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $654.00
source

Traveler: Branden Ritchie (from the office of Bob Goodlatte)
Destination: CAMBRIDGE, MD
Purpose: CONFERENCE REGARDING TECHNOLOGY & INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS
Date: Apr 22, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $360.00
source

Traveler: Darcie Brickner (from the office of Thomas Davis)
Destination: CAMBRIDGE, MD
Purpose: SEE ATTACHED
Date: Apr 22, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $758.00
source

Traveler: Eric Lutz (from the office of Jim Mcdermott)
Destination: CAMBRIDGE, MD
Purpose: SUMMIT FEATURING PANELS AND DISCUSSIONS ON THE CURRENT CHALLENGES FACING THE US AND WORLD INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND PATENT SYSTEMS AND POSSIBLE LEGISLATIVE SOLUTIONS
Date: Apr 22, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $758.00
source

Traveler: Landon Stropko (from the office of Barbara Cubin)
Destination: CAMBRIDGE, MD
Purpose: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY & TECHNOLOGY SUMMIT
Date: Apr 22, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $758.00
source

Traveler: Victoria Stackwick (from the office of Randy Cunningham)
Destination: WASH DC-CAMBRIDGE, MD-ARLINGTON, VA
Purpose: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY & TECHNOLOGY SUMMIT
Date: Apr 22, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $451.00
source

Traveler: Jennifer Bellamy (from the office of Spencer Bachus)
Destination: CAMBRIDGE, MARYLAND
Purpose: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND TECHNOLOGY SUMMIT
Date: Apr 22, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $644.00
source

Traveler: Sandra Abrevaya (from the office of Henry Cuellar)
Destination: LOCATED AT CAMBRIDGE, MARYLAND
Purpose: DISCUSSING LEGISLATIVE ISSUES AND PROPOSALS ON INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY, INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY, AND INNOVATION
Date: Apr 22, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $644.00
source

Traveler: Peter Hinga (from the office of John Salazar)
Destination: CAMBRIDGE, MD
Purpose: LEARN ABOUT THE COMPLEX INTERACTIONS BETWEEN INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY, INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY & INNOVATION
Date: Apr 22, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $758.00
source

Traveler: Chris Iacaruso (from the office of Collin Peterson)
Destination: CAMBRIDGE, MD
Purpose: THE CONFERENCE FOCUSED ON THE RULE OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS IN THE TECH SECTOR, THE GOAL WAS TO BRING TOGETHER A DIVERSE SET OF VIEWS FROM INDUSTRY, GOVT NON-PROFIT AND THE MEDIA TO DISCUSS HOW THE CURRENT IP REGION IS WORKING FOR THE INDUSTRY AND
Date: Apr 22, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $674.00
source

Traveler: Dave Grimaldi (from the office of Edolphus Towns)
Destination: CHESAPEAKE BAY
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL STAFF SUMMIT
Date: Apr 22, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $644.00
source



American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball