American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
Students in Kentucky taking a Common Core math test. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Greater Expectations

The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there's plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning. Teachers say Common Core has the potential to help kids who are behind, as well as those who are ahead. But many teachers have big concerns about the Common Core tests. The new, tougher tests are meant to let the nation know how kids are really doing in school -- but bad scores could get teachers and principals fired.

Recent Posts

  • 08.29.14

    Greater Expectations transcript

  • 08.28.14

    A teacher loses faith in the Common Core

    New York teacher Kevin Glynn was once a big fan of the Common Core, but he says the standardized testing that's come along with it is reducing students to test scores and narrowing what gets taught in schools.
  • 08.28.14

    Are you smarter than a Common Core student? Try a Common Core test

    New Common Core tests are supposed to measure students' ability to think critically, analyze information, and cite evidence as well as test their conceptual understanding of mathematics and their ability to apply math to the real world. See how you'd do on a Common Core test.
  • 08.28.14

    Questioning the Common Core tests

    In the United States, education standards come with tests. Most students haven't been tested on the Common Core yet. But in one state where they have, the controversy is so intense that it's threatening to bring down the Common Core altogether.

American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
Students in Kentucky taking a Common Core math test. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Greater Expectations

The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there's plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning. Teachers say Common Core has the potential to help kids who are behind, as well as those who are ahead. But many teachers have big concerns about the Common Core tests. The new, tougher tests are meant to let the nation know how kids are really doing in school -- but bad scores could get teachers and principals fired.

Recent Posts

  • 08.29.14

    Greater Expectations transcript

  • 08.28.14

    A teacher loses faith in the Common Core

    New York teacher Kevin Glynn was once a big fan of the Common Core, but he says the standardized testing that's come along with it is reducing students to test scores and narrowing what gets taught in schools.
  • 08.28.14

    Are you smarter than a Common Core student? Try a Common Core test

    New Common Core tests are supposed to measure students' ability to think critically, analyze information, and cite evidence as well as test their conceptual understanding of mathematics and their ability to apply math to the real world. See how you'd do on a Common Core test.
  • 08.28.14

    Questioning the Common Core tests

    In the United States, education standards come with tests. Most students haven't been tested on the Common Core yet. But in one state where they have, the controversy is so intense that it's threatening to bring down the Common Core altogether.

Back to The Data

Trips sponsored by

Association for Competitive Technology


Total cost of 22 trips: $14,184.66


Traveler: Jeff Palmore (from the office of Edward Schrock)
Destination: CHICAGO, IL
Purpose: FACT-FINDING/EDUCATIONAL
Date: Aug 28, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $543.78
source

Traveler: Scott Parman (from the office of Tom Cole)
Destination: CHICAGO O'HARE
Purpose: TOUR ORBITZ HQ AND LEARN ABOUT THEIR TELECOMMUNICATION POLICY STANCES
Date: Aug 28, 2003 (4 days)
Expense: $569.94
source

Traveler: Amy Cook (from the office of Michael Rogers)
Destination: CHICAGO, IL
Purpose: TOUR/DISCUSSION W/ORBITZ COMPANY
Date: Aug 28, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $569.94
source

Traveler: Philip Schuyler (from the office of John Tanner)
Destination: CAMBRIDGE MD
Purpose: ATTEND A SUMMIT FOCUSING ON THE ROLE OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS IN THE TECHNOLOGY SECTOR AND TO DISCUSS HOW THE CURRENT IP REGIME IS WORKING AND WAYS IT CAN BE
Date: Mar 25, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $701.00
source

Traveler: Paul Unger (from the office of George Allen)
Destination: CHESAPEAKE, MD
Purpose: PARTICIPATE IN A SUMMIT FOCUSING ON THE ROLE OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS IN THE TECHNOLOGY SECTOR. THE GOAL OF THE SUMMIT IS TO BRING DIVERSE VIEWS ON THE CURRENT INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY REGIME AND HOW IT CAN BE IMPROVED
Date: Apr 22, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $399.00
source

Traveler: Spivey Paup (from the office of John Carter)
Destination: CAMBRIDGE, MARYLAND
Purpose: WEEKEND SUMMIT/CONFERENCE FOCUSING ON THE TOPIC OF THE ROLE OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS IN THE TECHNOLOGY SECTOR
Date: Apr 22, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $758.00
source

Traveler: Bob Sakaniwa (from the office of Michael Honda)
Destination: CAMBRIDGE, MD
Purpose: ACT HOSTED A SUMMIT FOCUSING ON THE ROLE OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY (IP) RIGHTS IN THE TECHNOLOGY SECTOR AND TO DISCUSS WHETHER THE SYSTEM IS WORKING FOR THE TECH INDUSTRY
Date: Apr 22, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $850.00
source

Traveler: Richard Beutel (from the office of Donald Manzullo)
Destination: ALEXANDRIA, VA-EASTON, MD
Purpose: TO ATTEND THE INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND TECHNOLOGY SUMMIT. TO PARTICIPATE IN PANEL SESSIONS REGARDING IPR AND INNOVATION POLICY FOR SME'S
Date: Apr 22, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $644.00
source

Traveler: Erin Berry (from the office of John Hostettler)
Destination: CAMBRIDGE, MD
Purpose: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY & TECHNOLOGY SUMMIT
Date: Apr 22, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $758.00
source

Traveler: Jason Scism (from the office of Darrell Issa)
Destination: WASHINGTON, DC; CAMBRIDGE, MARYLAND; ARLINGTON, VA
Purpose: SUMMIT ON THE ROLE OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY IN THE TECHNOLOGY SECTOR
Date: Apr 22, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $644.00
source

Traveler: Christal Sheppard (from the office of Bart Gordon)
Destination: CAMBRIDGE, MD
Purpose: TO ATTEND SUMMIT FOCUSING ON THE ROLD OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS IN THE TECHNOLOGY SECTOR
Date: Apr 22, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $644.00
source

Traveler: David Cavicke (from the office of Joe Barton)
Destination: CAMBRIDGE, MD
Purpose: ATTEND CONFERENCE, EDUCATION: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY
Date: Apr 22, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $654.00
source

Traveler: Branden Ritchie (from the office of Bob Goodlatte)
Destination: CAMBRIDGE, MD
Purpose: CONFERENCE REGARDING TECHNOLOGY & INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS
Date: Apr 22, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $360.00
source

Traveler: Darcie Brickner (from the office of Thomas Davis)
Destination: CAMBRIDGE, MD
Purpose: SEE ATTACHED
Date: Apr 22, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $758.00
source

Traveler: Eric Lutz (from the office of Jim Mcdermott)
Destination: CAMBRIDGE, MD
Purpose: SUMMIT FEATURING PANELS AND DISCUSSIONS ON THE CURRENT CHALLENGES FACING THE US AND WORLD INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND PATENT SYSTEMS AND POSSIBLE LEGISLATIVE SOLUTIONS
Date: Apr 22, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $758.00
source

Traveler: Landon Stropko (from the office of Barbara Cubin)
Destination: CAMBRIDGE, MD
Purpose: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY & TECHNOLOGY SUMMIT
Date: Apr 22, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $758.00
source

Traveler: Victoria Stackwick (from the office of Randy Cunningham)
Destination: WASH DC-CAMBRIDGE, MD-ARLINGTON, VA
Purpose: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY & TECHNOLOGY SUMMIT
Date: Apr 22, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $451.00
source

Traveler: Jennifer Bellamy (from the office of Spencer Bachus)
Destination: CAMBRIDGE, MARYLAND
Purpose: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND TECHNOLOGY SUMMIT
Date: Apr 22, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $644.00
source

Traveler: Sandra Abrevaya (from the office of Henry Cuellar)
Destination: LOCATED AT CAMBRIDGE, MARYLAND
Purpose: DISCUSSING LEGISLATIVE ISSUES AND PROPOSALS ON INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY, INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY, AND INNOVATION
Date: Apr 22, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $644.00
source

Traveler: Peter Hinga (from the office of John Salazar)
Destination: CAMBRIDGE, MD
Purpose: LEARN ABOUT THE COMPLEX INTERACTIONS BETWEEN INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY, INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY & INNOVATION
Date: Apr 22, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $758.00
source

Traveler: Chris Iacaruso (from the office of Collin Peterson)
Destination: CAMBRIDGE, MD
Purpose: THE CONFERENCE FOCUSED ON THE RULE OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS IN THE TECH SECTOR, THE GOAL WAS TO BRING TOGETHER A DIVERSE SET OF VIEWS FROM INDUSTRY, GOVT NON-PROFIT AND THE MEDIA TO DISCUSS HOW THE CURRENT IP REGION IS WORKING FOR THE INDUSTRY AND
Date: Apr 22, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $674.00
source

Traveler: Dave Grimaldi (from the office of Edolphus Towns)
Destination: CHESAPEAKE BAY
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL STAFF SUMMIT
Date: Apr 22, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $644.00
source



American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
Students in Kentucky taking a Common Core math test. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Greater Expectations

The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there's plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning. Teachers say Common Core has the potential to help kids who are behind, as well as those who are ahead. But many teachers have big concerns about the Common Core tests. The new, tougher tests are meant to let the nation know how kids are really doing in school -- but bad scores could get teachers and principals fired.

Recent Posts

  • 08.29.14

    Greater Expectations transcript

  • 08.28.14

    A teacher loses faith in the Common Core

    New York teacher Kevin Glynn was once a big fan of the Common Core, but he says the standardized testing that's come along with it is reducing students to test scores and narrowing what gets taught in schools.
  • 08.28.14

    Are you smarter than a Common Core student? Try a Common Core test

    New Common Core tests are supposed to measure students' ability to think critically, analyze information, and cite evidence as well as test their conceptual understanding of mathematics and their ability to apply math to the real world. See how you'd do on a Common Core test.
  • 08.28.14

    Questioning the Common Core tests

    In the United States, education standards come with tests. Most students haven't been tested on the Common Core yet. But in one state where they have, the controversy is so intense that it's threatening to bring down the Common Core altogether.