American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

Back to The Data

Trips sponsored by

American Sugar Alliance


Total cost of 41 trips: $78,460.44


Traveler: Virginia Haterius (from the office of Larry Combest)
Destination: STEAMBOAT SPRINGS, CO
Purpose: TO BECOME BETTER INFORMED ON THE ISSUES AFFECTING SWEETNER INDUSTRY.
Date: Aug 5, 2000 (6 days)
Expense: $1,374.40
source

Traveler: Lance Kotschwar (from the office of Larry Combest)
Destination: STEAMBOAT SPRINGS, CO
Purpose: ASA ANNUAL SYMPOSIUM & 2002 FARM BILL POLICY CONFERENCE
Date: Aug 5, 2000 (7 days)
Expense: $1,056.72
source

Traveler: Christy Cromley (from the office of Larry Combest)
Destination: STEAMBOAT SPRINGS, CO
Purpose: ATTEND ANNUAL CONFERENCE
Date: Aug 5, 2000 (4 days)
Expense: $1,610.08
source

Traveler: Ryan Weston (from the office of Larry Combest)
Destination: STEAMBOAT SPRINGS, CO
Purpose: ATTEND ANNUAL CONFERENCE
Date: Aug 5, 2000 (4 days)
Expense: $1,848.14
source

Traveler: Tom Sell (from the office of Larry Combest)
Destination: STEAMBOAT SPRINGS, CO
Purpose: TO ATTEND INTERNATIONAL SWEETENER SYMPOSIUM.
Date: Aug 6, 2000 (3 days)
Expense: $1,396.45
source

Traveler: Larry Combest (from the office of Larry Combest)
Destination: WASHINGTON DC-STEAMBOAT SPRINGS, CO
Purpose: TALK ABOUT FARM LEGISLATION
Date: Aug 6, 2000 (2 days)
Expense: $1,929.37
source

Traveler: Charles Stenholm (from the office of Charles Stenholm)
Destination: STEAMBOAT SPRINGS, COLORADO
Purpose: SPEECH
Date: Aug 7, 2000 (2 days)
Expense: $2,653.90
source

Traveler: Thomas Ewing (from the office of Thomas Ewing)
Destination: STEAMBOAT SPRINGS, CO
Purpose: SWEETNER SYMPOSIUM
Date: Aug 7, 2000 (2 days)
Expense: $2,598.95
source

Traveler: Thomas Wanley (from the office of Neil Abercrombie)
Destination: WEST PALM BEACH, CLEWISTON, FLORIDA
Purpose: INSPECTING SUGAR CANE GROWING, HARVESTING, MILLING, REFINING AND TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES
Date: Feb 21, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $712.00
source

Traveler: Charles Stenholm (from the office of Charles Stenholm)
Destination: SUN VALLEY, UTAH
Purpose: SPEECH
Date: Aug 4, 2001 (3 days)
Expense: $3,848.40
source

Traveler: John Haugen (from the office of Larry Combest)
Destination: SUN VALLEY, ID
Purpose: ATTEND SYMPOSIUM ON DOMESTIC SWEETENER INDUSTRY
Date: Aug 4, 2001 (7 days)
Expense: $1,473.86
source

Traveler: Stephen Haterius (from the office of Larry Combest)
Destination: SUN VALLEY, IDAHO
Purpose: TO BECOME BETTER INFORMED ON THE ISSUES AFFECTING THE SWEETNER INDUSTRY
Date: Aug 4, 2001 (4 days)
Expense: $2,245.94
source

Traveler: Walter Vinson (from the office of Larry Combest)
Destination: SUN VALLEY RESORT SUN VALLEY, IDAHO
Purpose: INTERNATIONAL SWEETNER SYMPOSIUM
Date: Aug 4, 2001 (4 days)
Expense: $1,391.76
source

Traveler: Ryan Weston (from the office of Larry Combest)
Destination: SAN VALLEY, IDAHO
Purpose: ATTEND ASA ANNUAL MEETING
Date: Aug 5, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $941.98
source

Traveler: John Revier (from the office of Mike Simpson)
Destination: 18TH ANNUAL SWEETENER SYMPOSIUM-SUN VALLEY, IDAHO
Purpose: EDUCATION
Date: Aug 6, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $381.00
source

Traveler: John Breaux (from the office of John Breaux)
Destination: HYATT REGENCY RESORT AND SPA, BERNALILLO, NEW MEXICO
Purpose: KEYNOTE SPEAKER AT 19TH ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL SWEETENER SYMPOSIUM
Date: Aug 3, 2002 (4 days)
Expense: $6,957.16
source

Traveler: Travis Jones (from the office of Larry Craig)
Destination: FROM BALTIMORE-WASHINGTON INTERNATIONAL TO ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO
Purpose: SWEETENE SYMPOSIUM CONVENTION, AUGUST 4TH-AUGUST 7TH TO DISCUSS & MEET ON AMERICAS SUGAR INDUSTRY ISSUES IN TODAY'S MARKET
Date: Aug 4, 2002 (3 days)
Expense: $1,271.34
source

Traveler: John Broussard (from the office of John Breaux)
Destination: BERNALILLO, NEW MEXICO
Purpose: TO ATTEND CONFERENCE
Date: Aug 4, 2002 (3 days)
Expense: $1,639.14
source

Traveler: Timothy Galvin (from the office of Kent Conrad)
Destination: ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO
Purpose: SPEAK AT ASA CONFERENCE
Date: Aug 4, 2002 (3 days)
Expense: $1,374.90
source

Traveler: Matthew O'mara (from the office of Thad Cochran)
Destination: BLAINE, WASHINGTON
Purpose: SPEECH AND PARTICIPATION IN EVENTS
Date: Aug 2, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $1,685.00
source

Traveler: Charles Stenholm (from the office of Charles Stenholm)
Destination: BLAINE, WASHINGTON
Purpose: SPEECH
Date: Aug 2, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $1,458.47
source

Traveler: Stephen Haterius (from the office of Bob Goodlatte)
Destination:
Purpose: REMAIN CURRENT ON ISSUES AFFECTING THE SUGAR INDUSTRY
Date: Aug 2, 2003 (4 days)
Expense: $2,309.11
source

Traveler: Eliot Engel (from the office of Eliot Engel)
Destination: SEATTLE
Purpose:
Date: Aug 2, 2003 (6 days)
Expense: $4,983.40
source

Traveler: John Gilliland (from the office of Max Baucus)
Destination: BLAINE, WA (USA)
Purpose: SPEAK AT 2003 SWEETENER SYMPOSIUM HELD BY U.S. SWEETENER INDUSTRY
Date: Aug 4, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $1,837.55
source

Traveler: Travis Jones (from the office of Larry Craig)
Destination: VAIL, COLORADO
Purpose: AMERICAN SUGAR ALLIANCE INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM
Date: Aug 7, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $1,368.06
source

Traveler: Kristen Knepper (from the office of Debbie Stabenow)
Destination: VAIL, COLORADO
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL
Date: Aug 7, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $1,267.50
source

Traveler: Bryn Stewart (from the office of Craig Thomas)
Destination: VAIL, CO
Purpose: FACT FINDING
Date: Aug 7, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $997.74
source

Traveler: Neil Abercrombie (from the office of Neil Abercrombie)
Destination: HONOLULU-DENVER
Purpose: SPEECH
Date: Aug 7, 2004 (5 days)
Expense: $5,415.96
source

Traveler: Mark Foley (from the office of Mark Foley)
Destination: DENVER, CO
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT
Date: Aug 7, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $1,186.22
source

Traveler: Brent Gattis (from the office of Bob Goodlatte)
Destination: VAIL, COLORADO
Purpose: ATTEND THE INTERNATIONAL SWEETNER SYMPOSIUM
Date: Aug 7, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $1,817.47
source

Traveler: Claire Folbre (from the office of Bob Goodlatte)
Destination: VAIL, COLORADO
Purpose: ATTEND SWEETENER SYMPORIUM; DISCUSS SUGAR ISSUES WITH PRODUCERS
Date: Aug 7, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $1,429.16
source

Traveler: Russell Middleton (from the office of Bob Goodlatte)
Destination:
Purpose: TO BETTER UNDERSTAND CURRENT CONCERNS OF THE SUGAR INDUSTRY
Date: Aug 7, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $1,960.27
source

Traveler: Debbie Stabenow (from the office of Debbie Stabenow)
Destination: VAIL, COLORADO
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT
Date: Aug 8, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $4,041.00
source

Traveler: Kent Conrad (from the office of Kent Conrad)
Destination: VAIL, COLORADO
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT
Date: Aug 8, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $1,134.50
source

Traveler: Thomas Mahr (from the office of Kent Conrad)
Destination: VAIL, COLORADO
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN AN EDUCATIONAL FORUM ON TRADE, BUDGET, AND AGRICULTURAL POLICY ISSUES RELATED TO THE U.S. SUGAR INDUSTRY
Date: Aug 8, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $838.74
source

Traveler: Craig Thomas (from the office of Craig Thomas)
Destination: VAIL, CO
Purpose: SPEECH AT INTERNATIONAL SWEETENER SYMPOSIUM
Date: Aug 8, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $951.75
source

Traveler: Samuel Roche (from the office of Charlie Melancon)
Destination: SUN VALLEY/BOISE, IA
Purpose: ANNUAL CONFERENCE, DISCUSSION OF SUGAR POLICY, INDUSTRY, AND OUTLOOK FOR THE YEAR AHEAD
Date: Aug 6, 2005 (4 days)
Expense: $1,262.11
source

Traveler: Charlie Melancon (from the office of Charlie Melancon)
Destination: SUN VALLEY
Purpose: SPEECH TO SYMPOSIUM
Date: Aug 6, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $2,544.80
source

Traveler: Russell Middleton (from the office of Collin Peterson)
Destination: WASHINGTON, DC TO BOISE, IDAHO TO SUN VALLEY, IDAHO
Purpose: TO HEAR AND DISCUSS THE CONCERNS AND ISSUES FACING THE DOMESTIC SWEETNER INDUSTRY
Date: Aug 6, 2005 (4 days)
Expense: $1,498.14
source

Traveler: Earnest Goule (from the office of Collin Peterson)
Destination: MSP-BORSE, ID-DCA
Purpose: TO LEARN ABOUT THE DOMESTIC AND INTERNATIONAL ISSUES THAT AFFECT THE SWEETNER INDUSTRY
Date: Aug 7, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $1,309.00
source

Traveler: Joshua Heird (from the office of Mike Simpson)
Destination: BOISE
Purpose: BOSS HAD SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT AT THE 2005 SWEETNER SYMPOSIUM
Date: Aug 8, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $459.00
source



American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.