American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.

Back to The Data

Trips sponsored by

American Airlines


Total cost of 18 trips: $12,493.27


Traveler: Patrick Souders (from the office of Richard Durbin)
Destination: DALLAS/FT. WORTH, TX
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL STAFF TOUR/MEETINGS
Date: Jan 3, 2000 (3 days)
Expense: $750.00
source

Traveler: Richard Bender (from the office of Tom Harkin)
Destination: DALLAS, TEXAS
Purpose: STAFF GROUP TO DISCUSS AIRLINE ISSUES
Date: Jan 5, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $658.00
source

Traveler: Julian Norment (from the office of Ernest Hollings)
Destination: DALLAS, TEXAS
Purpose: TO GET A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF THE AIRLINE INDUSTRY BY TOURING FACILITY
Date: Jan 5, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $648.00
source

Traveler: Askia Suruma (from the office of Martin Frost)
Destination: DALLAS, TX
Purpose: TRANSPORTATION BRIEFING
Date: Jan 5, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $648.00
source

Traveler: Heidi Stirrup (from the office of Richard Armey)
Destination: DALLAS, TX
Purpose: TO OBSERVE AM. AIRLINES' OPERATIONS, LEARN ABOUT LATEST DEVELOPMENTS IN AIRLINE INDUSTRY, DISCUSS RELEVANT ISSUES
Date: Jan 5, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $662.00
source

Traveler: Heather Lepeska (from the office of Jerry Costello)
Destination: DALLAS
Purpose: DISCUSSION OF MAJOR AVIATION ISSUES
Date: Jan 5, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $648.00
source

Traveler: Richard Grant (from the office of Thomas Ewing)
Destination: DALLAS, TX
Purpose: OVERVIEW OF AIRLINE INDUSTRY
Date: Jan 5, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $648.00
source

Traveler: Mike Mckay (from the office of Gregory Meeks)
Destination: DALLAS, TEXAS
Purpose: FACT FINDING
Date: Jan 5, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $648.00
source

Traveler: John Dasilva (from the office of Joseph Crowley)
Destination:
Purpose: STAFF EDUCATION
Date: Jan 5, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $672.00
source

Traveler: Paul Giuliano (from the office of Tim Holden)
Destination: DALLAS, TEXAS AMERICAN AIRLINE HQ'S
Purpose: TO SEE THE HQ OF AMERICAN AIRLINES & THE COMPLEXITY OF THE AIRLINE BUSINESS
Date: Jan 5, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $648.00
source

Traveler: Tricia Loveland (from the office of Bud Shuster)
Destination: DALLAS/FORT WORTH, TEXAS
Purpose: FACT FINDING
Date: Jan 5, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $648.00
source

Traveler: Ruth Van Mark (from the office of James Inhofe)
Destination: TULS, OK & DALLAS-FT. WORTH, TX
Purpose: VIEW MAINTENANCE FACILITY IN TULSA, OK & THEN TRAVEL TO DALLAS - FT WORTH, FOR DISCUSSIONS W/ AMERICAN AIRLINE SERVICE OFFICERS
Date: Mar 25, 2002 (1 day)
Expense: $372.00
source

Traveler: Mike Mckay (from the office of Gregory Meeks)
Destination: FT. WORTH, TULSA OKLAHOMA-DALLAS
Purpose: FACT-FINDING
Date: Mar 25, 2002 (1 day)
Expense: $371.50
source

Traveler: Charles Rangel (from the office of Charles Rangel)
Destination: PUNTA CANA, DOMINIAN REPUBLIC
Purpose: PROMOTION OF TRADE AND COMMERCE BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
Date: Jun 15, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $500.00
source

Traveler: Leanna Gutierrez (from the office of Bill Nelson)
Destination: MIAMI, FL
Purpose: VISIT MIA; VIEW AMERICAN AIRLINES TERMINALS; CARGO AREA; GENERAL OVERVIEW OF SECURELY AND CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS
Date: Mar 4, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $1,175.00
source

Traveler: Jason Onimet (from the office of Saxby Chambliss)
Destination: MIAMI, FL
Purpose: FACT FINDING
Date: Mar 4, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $861.37
source

Traveler: Charles Cooper (from the office of Mario Diaz-Balart)
Destination: MIA
Purpose: BAGGAGE SECURITY & CARGO ISSUES
Date: Mar 4, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $861.37
source

Traveler: Jacob Kurtz (from the office of Robert Wexler)
Destination: MIA
Purpose: BAGGAGE SECURITY & CARGO ISSUES
Date: Mar 4, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $1,074.03
source



American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.