American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

Back to The Data

Trips sponsored by

American Airlines


Total cost of 18 trips: $12,493.27


Traveler: Patrick Souders (from the office of Richard Durbin)
Destination: DALLAS/FT. WORTH, TX
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL STAFF TOUR/MEETINGS
Date: Jan 3, 2000 (3 days)
Expense: $750.00
source

Traveler: Richard Bender (from the office of Tom Harkin)
Destination: DALLAS, TEXAS
Purpose: STAFF GROUP TO DISCUSS AIRLINE ISSUES
Date: Jan 5, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $658.00
source

Traveler: Julian Norment (from the office of Ernest Hollings)
Destination: DALLAS, TEXAS
Purpose: TO GET A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF THE AIRLINE INDUSTRY BY TOURING FACILITY
Date: Jan 5, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $648.00
source

Traveler: Askia Suruma (from the office of Martin Frost)
Destination: DALLAS, TX
Purpose: TRANSPORTATION BRIEFING
Date: Jan 5, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $648.00
source

Traveler: Heidi Stirrup (from the office of Richard Armey)
Destination: DALLAS, TX
Purpose: TO OBSERVE AM. AIRLINES' OPERATIONS, LEARN ABOUT LATEST DEVELOPMENTS IN AIRLINE INDUSTRY, DISCUSS RELEVANT ISSUES
Date: Jan 5, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $662.00
source

Traveler: Heather Lepeska (from the office of Jerry Costello)
Destination: DALLAS
Purpose: DISCUSSION OF MAJOR AVIATION ISSUES
Date: Jan 5, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $648.00
source

Traveler: Richard Grant (from the office of Thomas Ewing)
Destination: DALLAS, TX
Purpose: OVERVIEW OF AIRLINE INDUSTRY
Date: Jan 5, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $648.00
source

Traveler: Mike Mckay (from the office of Gregory Meeks)
Destination: DALLAS, TEXAS
Purpose: FACT FINDING
Date: Jan 5, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $648.00
source

Traveler: John Dasilva (from the office of Joseph Crowley)
Destination:
Purpose: STAFF EDUCATION
Date: Jan 5, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $672.00
source

Traveler: Paul Giuliano (from the office of Tim Holden)
Destination: DALLAS, TEXAS AMERICAN AIRLINE HQ'S
Purpose: TO SEE THE HQ OF AMERICAN AIRLINES & THE COMPLEXITY OF THE AIRLINE BUSINESS
Date: Jan 5, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $648.00
source

Traveler: Tricia Loveland (from the office of Bud Shuster)
Destination: DALLAS/FORT WORTH, TEXAS
Purpose: FACT FINDING
Date: Jan 5, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $648.00
source

Traveler: Ruth Van Mark (from the office of James Inhofe)
Destination: TULS, OK & DALLAS-FT. WORTH, TX
Purpose: VIEW MAINTENANCE FACILITY IN TULSA, OK & THEN TRAVEL TO DALLAS - FT WORTH, FOR DISCUSSIONS W/ AMERICAN AIRLINE SERVICE OFFICERS
Date: Mar 25, 2002 (1 day)
Expense: $372.00
source

Traveler: Mike Mckay (from the office of Gregory Meeks)
Destination: FT. WORTH, TULSA OKLAHOMA-DALLAS
Purpose: FACT-FINDING
Date: Mar 25, 2002 (1 day)
Expense: $371.50
source

Traveler: Charles Rangel (from the office of Charles Rangel)
Destination: PUNTA CANA, DOMINIAN REPUBLIC
Purpose: PROMOTION OF TRADE AND COMMERCE BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
Date: Jun 15, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $500.00
source

Traveler: Leanna Gutierrez (from the office of Bill Nelson)
Destination: MIAMI, FL
Purpose: VISIT MIA; VIEW AMERICAN AIRLINES TERMINALS; CARGO AREA; GENERAL OVERVIEW OF SECURELY AND CONSTRUCTION PROGRESS
Date: Mar 4, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $1,175.00
source

Traveler: Jason Onimet (from the office of Saxby Chambliss)
Destination: MIAMI, FL
Purpose: FACT FINDING
Date: Mar 4, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $861.37
source

Traveler: Charles Cooper (from the office of Mario Diaz-Balart)
Destination: MIA
Purpose: BAGGAGE SECURITY & CARGO ISSUES
Date: Mar 4, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $861.37
source

Traveler: Jacob Kurtz (from the office of Robert Wexler)
Destination: MIA
Purpose: BAGGAGE SECURITY & CARGO ISSUES
Date: Mar 4, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $1,074.03
source



American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.