American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

Back to The Data

Trips sponsored by

US-Asean Business Council


Total cost of 23 trips: $124,048.14


Traveler: Ira Wolf (from the office of Max Baucus)
Destination: THAILAND
Purpose: INFORMATION GATHERING & ORIENTATION ON THAI POLITICS & ECONOMICS
Date: May 28, 2000 (8 days)
Expense: $3,350.80
source

Traveler: Louisa Schiller (from the office of Gordon Smith)
Destination: SINGAPORE
Purpose: BUSINESS/CULTURAL EXCHANGE
Date: Aug 25, 2000 (9 days)
Expense: $6,438.32
source

Traveler: Randall Soderquist (from the office of Jeff Bingaman)
Destination: MALAYSIA
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL
Date: Apr 6, 2001 (8 days)
Expense: $2,841.00
source

Traveler: Angela Ellard (from the office of William Thomas)
Destination: SINGAPORE - HANOI (VIETNAM) - HOCHI MINH CITY (VIETN)
Purpose: ACCOMPANY CONGRESSMAN CRANE ON TRADE AND ECONOMIC MISSION TO MEET WITHU.S. AND FOREIGN GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS AND BUSINESS REPRESENTATIVES
Date: Apr 6, 2001 (8 days)
Expense: $9,781.00
source

Traveler: Philip Crane (from the office of Philip Crane)
Destination: SINGAPORE - VIETNAM
Purpose: FACT-FINDING
Date: Apr 6, 2001 (9 days)
Expense: $19,562.00
source

Traveler: Charles Freeman (from the office of Frank Murkowski)
Destination: KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA
Purpose: STAFF DELEGATION TO MALAYSIA
Date: Apr 7, 2001 (9 days)
Expense: $1,800.82
source

Traveler: J J Piskadlo (from the office of Jim Davis)
Destination: KUALA LUMPUR & PERANG, MALAYSIA
Purpose: FACT FINDING
Date: Apr 8, 2001 (6 days)
Expense: $3,068.00
source

Traveler: David Broome (from the office of Bill Frist)
Destination: THAILAND / LAOS
Purpose: TRADE & COMMERCE BRIEFINGS
Date: Aug 5, 2001 (7 days)
Expense: $3,905.31
source

Traveler: Franklin Thompson (from the office of John Tanner)
Destination: DULLES AIRPORT TO BANGKOK, THAILAND
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL, WITH FOCUS ON CONTINUING EFFORTS TO RECOVER FROM ASIAN FINANCIAL CRISIS. ALSO TRADE RELATIONS
Date: Aug 5, 2001 (7 days)
Expense: $3,905.31
source

Traveler: Peter Muller (from the office of Ellen Tauscher)
Destination: BANGKOK, THAILAND
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL STAFF DELEGATION FACT-FINDING TRIP
Date: Jun 30, 2002 (7 days)
Expense: $3,317.50
source

Traveler: John Seggerman (from the office of Lincoln Chafee)
Destination: SINGAPORE, JAKARTA
Purpose: MEET WITH GOVERNMENT & PRIVATE SECTOR OFFICIALS TO UNDERSTAND & FURTHER US-SINGAPORE & US-INDONESIAN RELATIONS
Date: Aug 2, 2002 (9 days)
Expense: $6,941.00
source

Traveler: Jayme White (from the office of Jim Mcdermott)
Destination: SINGAPORE
Purpose: TO LEARN MORE ABOUT A FREE TRADE AGREEMENT WITH SINGAPORE
Date: Feb 1, 2003 (7 days)
Expense: $7,680.54
source

Traveler: Elizabeth Fay (from the office of Evan Bayh)
Destination: THAILAND
Purpose: DISCUSSIONS WITH GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS REGARDING BILATERAL TRADE TALKS
Date: Aug 3, 2003 (7 days)
Expense: $3,141.00
source

Traveler: J Thomas Brady (from the office of Sam Brownback)
Destination: BANGKOK, THAILAND
Purpose: THE FOCUS OF THE TRIP WILL BE ON THAILAND'S CONTINUING EFFORTS TO RECOVER FROM THE ASIAN FINANCIAL CRISIS, PROSPECTS FOR US-THAILAND FREE TRADE AGREEMENT AND COUNTERTERRORISM IN SOUTHEAST ASIA
Date: Aug 3, 2003 (7 days)
Expense: $3,988.64
source

Traveler: Brian Pomper (from the office of Max Baucus)
Destination: BANGKOK, THAILAND
Purpose: FACT FINDING CONGRESSIONAL STAFF DELEGATION
Date: Aug 3, 2003 (7 days)
Expense: $3,317.46
source

Traveler: Melvin Spence (from the office of William Jefferson)
Destination: BANGKOK, THAILAND - PHNOM PENH, CAMBODIA
Purpose: TRADE STAFF DELEGATION. TOPICS OF DISCUSSION WITH GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS & BUSINESS COMMUNITY INCLUDED US-THAILAND FREE TRADE AGREEMENT AND CAMBODIAN TEXTILE TRADE
Date: Jan 11, 2004 (7 days)
Expense: $4,077.97
source

Traveler: Brian Diffell (from the office of Roy Blunt)
Destination: ST LOUIS-BANGKOK-PHNAM PANH-WASH, DC
Purpose: TRADE DISCUSSIONS (FTA THAILAND, WTO CAMBODIA)
Date: Jan 11, 2004 (7 days)
Expense: $4,077.97
source

Traveler: Adam Peterman (from the office of Jim Ramstad)
Destination: KUALA LUMPUR AND PENANG, MALAYSIA
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL
Date: Apr 9, 2004 (9 days)
Expense: $7,248.00
source

Traveler: Adam Peterman (from the office of Jim Ramstad)
Destination: THAILAND
Purpose: TRADE-RELATED EDUCATIONAL
Date: Mar 25, 2005 (10 days)
Expense: $5,103.00
source

Traveler: Anthony Reed (from the office of J. Dennis Hastert)
Destination: BANGKOK, THAILAND
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL
Date: Mar 26, 2005 (7 days)
Expense: $5,016.25
source

Traveler: Nicole Venable (from the office of William Jefferson)
Destination: BANGKOK-PHUKETH
Purpose: GOVERNMENT MEETINGS ON US-THAILAND FTA, FOREIGN POLICY AND TSUNAMI RELIEF EFFORTS
Date: Mar 26, 2005 (7 days)
Expense: $5,116.25
source

Traveler: Eric Eikenberg (from the office of E. Clay Shaw)
Destination: BANGKOK, THAILAND-PHUKET, THAILAND
Purpose: TRIP HIGHLIGHTED THE PENDING FREE TRADE AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE U.S. AND THAILAND. TRIP ALSO DETAILED THE RELIEF EFFORTS FOLLOWING DECEMBER TSUNAMI
Date: Mar 26, 2005 (8 days)
Expense: $5,253.75
source

Traveler: Demetrios Marantis (from the office of Max Baucus)
Destination: THAILAND
Purpose: STAFF DELEGATION TRIP TO THAILAND
Date: Mar 27, 2005 (7 days)
Expense: $5,116.25
source



American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.