American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

Back to The Data

Trips sponsored by

St Louis Agri-Business Club


Total cost of 27 trips: $17,613.34


Traveler: Matthew Howe (from the office of Pat Roberts)
Destination: STL
Purpose: PARTICIPANT IN AGRI-BUSINESS CONFERENCE
Date: Aug 20, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $619.25
source

Traveler: Candice Cotton (from the office of Michael Enzi)
Destination: ST. LOUIS, MO AND SURROUNDING AREAS
Purpose: TO FAMILIARIZE THE STAFF MEMBER WITH AGRICULTURAL TRANSPORTATION, PROCESSING AND MID-WESTERN ISSUES
Date: Aug 20, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $618.25
source

Traveler: Kathryn Scott (from the office of Larry Combest)
Destination: ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI
Purpose: LEARN ABOUT AGRICULTURE & BUSINESSES AROUND ST. LOUIS
Date: Aug 20, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $618.25
source

Traveler: Amy Aarons (from the office of Robert Cramer)
Destination: VARIOUS AGRI-BUSINESS TOURS IN ST. LOUIS METRO AREA
Purpose: FIRST HAND ACCOUNT OF THE EFFECTS OF AGRICULTURE ON ECONOMY & THE PROBLEMS THEY ARE HAVING
Date: Aug 20, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $618.25
source

Traveler: Toby Stephens (from the office of Mike Ross)
Destination: ST. LOUIS
Purpose: INFORMATIVE ON AG & FARM BILL
Date: Aug 20, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $627.59
source

Traveler: Jenn Spurgat (from the office of Dennis Rehberg)
Destination: ST. LOUIS, MO
Purpose: AGRICULTURAL FACT FINDING
Date: Aug 20, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $618.25
source

Traveler: James Eichhorst (from the office of Timothy Johnson)
Destination:
Purpose: EXPLORE AGRICULTURE IN IL. - MO. AREA
Date: Aug 20, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $735.00
source

Traveler: Melinda Ruff (from the office of Ike Skelton)
Destination: ST. LOUIS, MO
Purpose: EDUCATION, TOURS OF MISSOURI AGRICULTURE/BUSINESS
Date: Aug 20, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $545.93
source

Traveler: Josh Fleming (from the office of Roy Blunt)
Destination: ST. LOUIS
Purpose: FACT FINDING MISSION
Date: Aug 20, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $618.25
source

Traveler: Don Lucietta (from the office of Roy Blunt)
Destination: ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL TOUR & WORKSHOP
Date: Aug 20, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $567.23
source

Traveler: Grant Erdel (from the office of Jo Ann Emerson)
Destination: DC - ST. LOUIS
Purpose: TOUR AGRICULTURE SITES/BUSINESS IN MO & IL
Date: Aug 20, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $588.13
source

Traveler: Shelby Neal (from the office of Kenny Hulshof)
Destination:
Purpose: AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS EDUCATION
Date: Aug 20, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $563.65
source

Traveler: Brian Wilson (from the office of Trent Lott)
Destination: MEMPHIS, TN TO ST. LOUIS, MO TO WASHINGTON DC
Purpose: MEETING WITH AGRICULTURAL COMMUNITY
Date: Aug 17, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $981.19
source

Traveler: Brian Klippenstein (from the office of Christopher Bond)
Destination: ST. LOUIS METRO AREA
Purpose: REVIEW SCIENCE, AGRICULTURAL, AND TRANSPORTATION ISSUES IMPORTANT TO THE AGRIBUSINESS CLUB
Date: Aug 17, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $800.00
source

Traveler: Christopher Bond (from the office of Christopher Bond)
Destination: ST. LOUIS METRO AREA
Purpose: REVIEW SCIENCE, AGRICULTURAL, AND TRANSPORTATION ISSUES IMPORTANT TO THE AGRIBUSINESS CLUB MEMBERS
Date: Aug 17, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $284.54
source

Traveler: Dana O'brien (from the office of Ike Skelton)
Destination: ST. LOUIS, MO, VICINITY
Purpose: VISIT FARMS AND LEARN ABOUT AGRICULTURE RELATED BUSINESSES IN THE ST. LOUIS, MO, AREA
Date: Aug 17, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $446.09
source

Traveler: Stephen Higginbothom (from the office of Thad Cochran)
Destination: ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL TOUR OF ST. LOUIS AREA AGRI-BUSINESS INTERESTS.
Date: Aug 18, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $640.69
source

Traveler: Katie Swaney (from the office of James Talent)
Destination: ST. LOUIS, MO
Purpose: TO LEAR ABOUT THE IMPORTANCE OF THE AGRICULTURE INDUSTRY IN ST. LOUIS
Date: Aug 18, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $936.96
source

Traveler: Michelle Allen (from the office of William Clay)
Destination: ST. LOUIS
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL STAFF WORKSHOP
Date: Aug 18, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $640.69
source

Traveler: Lauren Ellis (from the office of Todd Akin)
Destination: ST. LOUIS
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL STAFF WORKSHOP
Date: Aug 18, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $678.79
source

Traveler: Shimon Stein (from the office of Eric Cantor)
Destination: STL
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL STAFF WORKSHOP
Date: Aug 18, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $620.49
source

Traveler: Andrew House (from the office of Devin Nunes)
Destination: WASHINGTON, D.C. TO ST. LOUIS, MO
Purpose: FACT-FINDING AND EDUCATIONAL VISIT
Date: Aug 18, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $675.69
source

Traveler: Jacob Roche (from the office of Chris John)
Destination: TOURED VARIOUS AGRIBUSINESSES AND ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS/RIVER TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS
Purpose: UPDATE AND UNDERSTANDING OF AGRIBUSINESS ISSUES IN THE ST. LOUIS REGION (RIVER TRANSPORTATION AND BUSINESS/TRADE ISSUES)
Date: Aug 18, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $640.69
source

Traveler: Michael Shumaker (from the office of Kenny Hulshof)
Destination: LAMBERT ST. LOUIS AIRPORT
Purpose: TO BECOME FAMILIAR WITH THE NEEDS OF THE MULTI-BILLION DOLLAR AGRIBUSINESS CENTERED IN ST. LOUIS
Date: Aug 18, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $639.69
source

Traveler: Lauren Ellis (from the office of Todd Akin)
Destination: STL
Purpose: TO UNDERSTAND THE IMPORTANCE AND THE ROLE ST. LOUIS HAS IN THE AGRICULTURAL COMMUNITY. IN ADDITION, WE VISITED VARIOUS BUSINESSES IN THE ST. LOUIS REGION THAT SERVICE THE REGION'S FARMERS
Date: Aug 17, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $685.00
source

Traveler: Aaron Smith (from the office of Kenny Hulshof)
Destination: ST. LOUIS, MO (LAMBERT INTERNATIONAL)
Purpose: GRAIN FIRSTHAND KNOWLEDGE OF AGRICULTURE AND RELATED INDUSTRIES AND THEIR IMPACT ON THE ST. LOUIS ECONOMY
Date: Aug 17, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $802.40
source

Traveler: Tony Jackson (from the office of Collin Peterson)
Destination: ST. LOUIS, MO
Purpose: TO LEARN ABOUT THE CONNECTION BETWEEN AGRICULTURE AND BUSINESS IN ST. LOUIS
Date: Aug 17, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $802.40
source



American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.