American RadioWorks |
The campus of the University of Chicago. Kevin Carey says most students of the future won't be going to traditional college campuses. Photo: Wikipedia.

The End of College or the University of Everywhere

When education policy wonk Kevin Carey looks into the future, he sees the end of traditional colleges and universities and he says that's a good thing.

Recent Posts

  • 03.18.15

    UnRetirement

    Today older Americans are heading back to school in record numbers. Many have already started a career, but want to gain knowledge or skills that can make them more competitive in the workplace. Colleges and universities are grappling with the needs of a changing population of students.
  • 03.11.15

    The Test

    In her new book,“The Test: Why Our Schools are Obsessed with Standardized Testing–But You Don’t Have to Be,” NPR Education Blogger Anya Kamenetz examines the role testing plays in American public education.
  • 03.04.15

    An Administrator Responds to Adjunct Protests

    Last week, we talked about growing dissent among adjunct college instructors who claim they’re not getting compensated fairly for the work they do. This week we’ll hear from someone who has dealt with this issue from the administration side.
  • 02.26.15

    Adjunct voices

    Ahead of National Adjunct Walkout Day on February 25th, American RadioWorks asked adjunct professors around the country how things are going for them. The short answer? Not well.

American RadioWorks |
The campus of the University of Chicago. Kevin Carey says most students of the future won't be going to traditional college campuses. Photo: Wikipedia.

The End of College or the University of Everywhere

When education policy wonk Kevin Carey looks into the future, he sees the end of traditional colleges and universities and he says that's a good thing.

Recent Posts

  • 03.18.15

    UnRetirement

    Today older Americans are heading back to school in record numbers. Many have already started a career, but want to gain knowledge or skills that can make them more competitive in the workplace. Colleges and universities are grappling with the needs of a changing population of students.
  • 03.11.15

    The Test

    In her new book,“The Test: Why Our Schools are Obsessed with Standardized Testing–But You Don’t Have to Be,” NPR Education Blogger Anya Kamenetz examines the role testing plays in American public education.
  • 03.04.15

    An Administrator Responds to Adjunct Protests

    Last week, we talked about growing dissent among adjunct college instructors who claim they’re not getting compensated fairly for the work they do. This week we’ll hear from someone who has dealt with this issue from the administration side.
  • 02.26.15

    Adjunct voices

    Ahead of National Adjunct Walkout Day on February 25th, American RadioWorks asked adjunct professors around the country how things are going for them. The short answer? Not well.

Back to The Data

Trips sponsored by

Singapore International Foundation


Total cost of 17 trips: $103,109.85


Traveler: Nicole Venable (from the office of Michael Collins)
Destination: SINGAPORE
Purpose: MEETINGS WITH GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS ON SINGAPORE TRADE, ECONOMY US POLICY AND SOCIETY
Date: Aug 15, 1999 (7 days)
Expense: $6,184.16
source

Traveler: Amy Healy (from the office of Pat Danner)
Destination: SINGAPORE
Purpose: FACT FINDING
Date: Apr 14, 2000 (7 days)
Expense: $6,229.00
source

Traveler: Faith Blackburne (from the office of Gregory Meeks)
Destination: SINGAPORE
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL FACT FINDING TRIP
Date: Aug 25, 2000 (9 days)
Expense: $10,117.18
source

Traveler: Jordan Bernstein (from the office of Jo Ann Emerson)
Destination: SINGAPORE
Purpose: STUDY THE POLITICAL, SECURITY, AND TRADE RELATIONS BETWEEN THE U.S. AND SINGAPORE
Date: Aug 27, 2000 (6 days)
Expense: $6,315.00
source

Traveler: Sean Mulvaney (from the office of Jim Kolbe)
Destination: SINGAPORE
Purpose: U.S. - SINGAPORE RELATIONS/FACT FINDING
Date: Aug 12, 2001 (6 days)
Expense: $8,935.36
source

Traveler: Rick Boucher (from the office of Rick Boucher)
Destination: SINGAPORE
Purpose: SPEECH TO CONFERENCE ON THE U.S. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY POLICY AGENDA
Date: Aug 18, 2001 (5 days)
Expense: $4,900.00
source

Traveler: Marc Mealy (from the office of Gregory Meeks)
Destination: DULLES-TOKYO-SINGAPORE-NEWARK, NJ-REAGAN NAT. AIRPORT
Purpose: FACT-FINDING
Date: Mar 15, 2002 (17 days)
Expense: $6,984.70
source

Traveler: Robert Holste (from the office of Philip English)
Destination: SINGAPORE
Purpose: TRADE TRIP-INTERNATIONAL TRADE ISSUES/POLICY
Date: Mar 22, 2002 (9 days)
Expense: $6,762.29
source

Traveler: Stephanie Lester (from the office of William Thomas)
Destination: SINGAPORE
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL STAFF FACT-FINDING TRIP
Date: Mar 23, 2002 (8 days)
Expense: $6,790.96
source

Traveler: Edward Burrier (from the office of Edward Royce)
Destination: U.S.A TO SINGAPORE
Purpose: MEET WITH U.S. OFFICIALS IN SINGAPORE, AMBASSADOR, ETC MEET WITH SENIOR OFFICIALS IN SINGAPORE SUIT ON FTA
Date: Mar 23, 2002 (6 days)
Expense: $3,777.10
source

Traveler: George Shevlin (from the office of John Larson)
Destination: SINGAPORE, BANGKOK
Purpose: FACTFACTING/EDUCATION - SINGAPORE-US FTA, MILITARY RELATIONS
Date: Mar 23, 2002 (14 days)
Expense: $6,276.86
source

Traveler: Paul Poteet (from the office of Wally Herger)
Destination: MEETINGS WITH SINGAPORE GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL/FACT-FINDING
Date: Mar 23, 2002 (8 days)
Expense: $6,790.96
source

Traveler: Rohit Kumar (from the office of Trent Lott)
Destination: SINGAPORE
Purpose: TO MEET WITH U.S. EMBASSY OFFICIALS, SINGAPORE MINISTERS, AND OTHER OFFICIALS IN ORDER TO LEARN MORE ABOUT U.S. TRADE WITH SINGAPORE AND TO LEARN ABOUT SINGAPORE'S ANTI-TERRORISM EFFORTS
Date: Aug 10, 2002 (6 days)
Expense: $6,754.00
source

Traveler: Amy Angelier (from the office of Don Nickles)
Destination: SINGAPORE
Purpose: DISCUSS WITH DECISION MAKERS THE CURRENT ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL CLIMATE IN SINGAPORE
Date: Aug 10, 2002 (8 days)
Expense: $7,470.00
source

Traveler: Glen Downs (from the office of Walter Jones)
Destination: SINGAPORE
Purpose: MEET WITH BUSINESS, GOVERNMENT, AND CULTURAL LEADERS TO DISCUSS MATTERS OF MUTUAL IMPORTANCE
Date: Aug 27, 2005 (6 days)
Expense: $2,940.76
source

Traveler: Ed Mcdonald (from the office of Howard Coble)
Destination: SINGAPORE
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN A SERIES OF BRIEFINGS AND MEETINGS WITH OFFICIALS IN SINGAPORE TO DISCUSS RELATIONS BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND SINGAPORE
Date: Aug 27, 2005 (6 days)
Expense: $2,940.76
source

Traveler: Julie Nickson (from the office of Barbara Lee)
Destination: SINGAPORE
Purpose: FACT FINDING
Date: Aug 27, 2005 (6 days)
Expense: $2,940.76
source



American RadioWorks |
The campus of the University of Chicago. Kevin Carey says most students of the future won't be going to traditional college campuses. Photo: Wikipedia.

The End of College or the University of Everywhere

When education policy wonk Kevin Carey looks into the future, he sees the end of traditional colleges and universities and he says that's a good thing.

Recent Posts

  • 03.18.15

    UnRetirement

    Today older Americans are heading back to school in record numbers. Many have already started a career, but want to gain knowledge or skills that can make them more competitive in the workplace. Colleges and universities are grappling with the needs of a changing population of students.
  • 03.11.15

    The Test

    In her new book,“The Test: Why Our Schools are Obsessed with Standardized Testing–But You Don’t Have to Be,” NPR Education Blogger Anya Kamenetz examines the role testing plays in American public education.
  • 03.04.15

    An Administrator Responds to Adjunct Protests

    Last week, we talked about growing dissent among adjunct college instructors who claim they’re not getting compensated fairly for the work they do. This week we’ll hear from someone who has dealt with this issue from the administration side.
  • 02.26.15

    Adjunct voices

    Ahead of National Adjunct Walkout Day on February 25th, American RadioWorks asked adjunct professors around the country how things are going for them. The short answer? Not well.