American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball

American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball

Back to The Data

Trips sponsored by

National Council for Community and Education Partnerships


Total cost of 14 trips: $23,327.15


Traveler: Daniel Barba (from the office of Loretta Sanchez)
Destination: SANTA ANA, CA
Purpose: HISPANIC/LATINO EDUCATION POLICY FORUM
Date: Apr 16, 2001 (4 days)
Expense: $1,560.00
source

Traveler: Emily Merchant (from the office of Jim Matheson)
Destination: LOS ANGELES, CA TO OXNARD, CA
Purpose: ATTENDANCE AT MEETINGS ON EDUCATION-SCHOOL-SITE VISITS
Date: Apr 17, 2001 (4 days)
Expense: $2,063.75
source

Traveler: Jonathan Poverud (from the office of Karen Thurman)
Destination: OXNARD, CA
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL
Date: Apr 17, 2001 (4 days)
Expense: $1,596.50
source

Traveler: Leticia Mederos (from the office of Carrie Meek)
Destination: LAX/CAX
Purpose: CONFERENCE ON EDUCATIONAL PARTNERSHIPS
Date: Apr 17, 2001 (5 days)
Expense: $1,596.50
source

Traveler: Tiffany Mulligan (from the office of Mark Souder)
Destination: OXNARD, CA
Purpose: FACT FINDING & EDUCATIONAL VISIT; ATTENDED SEMINARS
Date: Apr 17, 2001 (4 days)
Expense: $2,127.25
source

Traveler: Minnie Langham (from the office of Bennie Thompson)
Destination: WASHINGTON, D.C. TO LOS ANGELES, CA
Purpose: EVALUATE THE FEDERAL ROLE IN ELIMINATING EDUCATIONAL BARRIERS AT CRITICAL TRANSITION POINTS.
Date: Apr 17, 2001 (5 days)
Expense: $1,546.50
source

Traveler: Constance Olivia Harvey (from the office of Bennie Thompson)
Destination: WASHINGTON, D.C. TO LOS ANGELES, CA
Purpose: EVALUATE THE FEDERAL ROLE IN ELIMINATING EDUCATIONAL BARRIERS AT CRITICAL TRANSITION POINTS
Date: Apr 17, 2001 (5 days)
Expense: $1,546.50
source

Traveler: Joseph Richburg (from the office of Donald Payne)
Destination:
Purpose: DISCUSSION ON ACCESS TO HIGHER EDUCATION
Date: Apr 17, 2001 (4 days)
Expense: $2,127.25
source

Traveler: Larry Walker (from the office of Major Owens)
Destination:
Purpose: TO EXAMINE THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENTS ROLE IN K-16 EDUCATION
Date: Apr 17, 2001 (4 days)
Expense: $1,596.50
source

Traveler: James Kvaal (from the office of George Miller)
Destination: OXNARD, CALIFORNIA
Purpose: CONFERENCE ON K-16 PARTNERSHIPS
Date: Apr 17, 2001 (5 days)
Expense: $1,596.50
source

Traveler: Stephanie Christensen (from the office of Deborah Pryce)
Destination: EDUCATION CONFERENCE IN OXNARD, CA AT EMBASSY SUITES
Purpose: EDUCATION CONFERENCE-FOCUSED ON UNDERSERVED AND MINORITY ED PROGRAMS
Date: Apr 17, 2001 (5 days)
Expense: $1,596.50
source

Traveler: Karen Bloom (from the office of Robert Borski)
Destination:
Purpose: DEVELOPING THE FEDERAL & STATE ROLE IN IMPROVING K-12 EDUCATION
Date: Apr 17, 2001 (4 days)
Expense: $1,665.00
source

Traveler: Arthur Estopinan (from the office of Ileana Ros-Lehtinen)
Destination: SANTA ANNA, CA TO OXNARD, CA AND OXNARD, CA TO WASHINGTON, DC
Purpose: VISIT LOW-INCOME SCHOOLS IN OXNARD TO STUDY THEIR EDUCATION CURRICULUM
Date: Apr 18, 2001 (4 days)
Expense: $1,546.50
source

Traveler: Arthur Estopinan (from the office of Ileana Ros-Lehtinen)
Destination: BROWNSVILLE, TX
Purpose: LEARN EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS TO HELP LOW INCOME MINORITY STUDENTS SUCCEED IN K-12 SCHOOLS-HOW CONGRESS CAN SUPPORT PROGRAMS-SUCH AS ENLACE
Date: Sep 25, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $1,161.90
source



American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball