American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

Back to The Data

Trips sponsored by

Communications Consortium Media Center


Total cost of 7 trips: $6,846.31


Traveler: Al Green (from the office of Al Green)
Destination: SRI LANKA
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL TRIP TO STUDY THE RELIEF EFFORTS OF THE UNFPA AFTER THE TSUNAMI DISASTER
Date: Jan 15, 2005 (4 days)
Expense: $1,001.97
source

Traveler: Oscar Ramirez (from the office of Al Green)
Destination: SRI LANKA
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL TRIP TO STUDY TSUNAMI DISASTER RELIEF EFFORTS COORDINATED BY THE UNFPA
Date: Jan 15, 2005 (4 days)
Expense: $916.97
source

Traveler: Joseph Crowley (from the office of Joseph Crowley)
Destination: SRI LANKA
Purpose: VISIT TSUNAMI AFFECTED REGION OF SRI LANKA, SEE FIRST HAND THE WORK OF UNFPA DEALING IN A REFUGEE SITUATION
Date: Jan 15, 2005 (4 days)
Expense: $1,001.97
source

Traveler: Gregg Sheiowitz (from the office of Joseph Crowley)
Destination: SRI LANKA
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL
Date: Jan 15, 2005 (4 days)
Expense: $1,083.93
source

Traveler: Chris Mccannell (from the office of Joseph Crowley)
Destination: SRI LANKA
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL
Date: Jan 15, 2005 (4 days)
Expense: $932.95
source

Traveler: Sheila Jackson Lee (from the office of Sheila Jackson Lee)
Destination: SINGAPORE-SRI LANKA-NEWARK
Purpose: TSUNAMI RELIEF EFFORTS
Date: Jan 15, 2005 (4 days)
Expense: $988.73
source

Traveler: Assad Akhter (from the office of Sheila Jackson Lee)
Destination: SINGAPORE-SRI LANKA-NEWARK
Purpose: TSUNAMI RELIEF EFFORTS
Date: Jan 15, 2005 (4 days)
Expense: $919.79
source



American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.