American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

Back to The Data

Trips sponsored by

Center for Middle East Peace & Economic Cooperation


Total cost of 25 trips: $240,598.86


Traveler: Robert Wexler (from the office of Robert Wexler)
Destination: MOROCCO; KUWAIT; UNITED ARAB EMIRATES; OMAN
Purpose: EDUCATION/MEETING W/GOVT OFFICIALS
Date: Jan 10, 2000 (7 days)
Expense: $14,408.92
source

Traveler: David Price (from the office of David Price)
Destination: MOROCCO, TUNISIA, KUWAIT, ABU DHABI, U.A.E.
Purpose: FACT FINDING
Date: Jan 10, 2000 (7 days)
Expense: $10,304.10
source

Traveler: James Moran (from the office of James Moran)
Destination: MIDDLE EAST (MOROCCO, TUNISIA, ALGERIA & EGYPT)
Purpose: FACT FINDING
Date: Apr 17, 2000 (6 days)
Expense: $6,946.00
source

Traveler: Maurice Hinchey (from the office of Maurice Hinchey)
Destination: MOROCCO, TUNISIA, ALGERIA, EGYPT
Purpose: MEETINGS TO EXCHANGE VIEWS ON HOW BEST TO FURTHER THE PEACE PROCESS
Date: Apr 18, 2000 (2 days)
Expense: $8,351.79
source

Traveler: Maurice Hinchey (from the office of Maurice Hinchey)
Destination: DAMASCUS, CAIRO, TEL AVIV
Purpose: FACT FINDING TRIP
Date: Nov 18, 2000 (4 days)
Expense: $9,157.05
source

Traveler: Robert Torricelli (from the office of Robert Torricelli)
Destination: SYRIA, ISRAEL, EGYPT, FRANCE
Purpose: FACT-FINDING/CONSULTATION
Date: Nov 19, 2000 (7 days)
Expense: $15,437.46
source

Traveler: John Bradshaw (from the office of Robert Torricelli)
Destination: SYRIA, ISRAEL, EGYPT
Purpose: FACT-FINDING/CONSULTATION
Date: Nov 19, 2000 (4 days)
Expense: $9,413.12
source

Traveler: James Moran (from the office of James Moran)
Destination: MIDDLE EAST
Purpose: FACT FINDING
Date: Feb 17, 2001 (6 days)
Expense: $7,878.09
source

Traveler: Robert Wexler (from the office of Robert Wexler)
Destination: TEL AVIV, AMMAN, BEIRUT
Purpose: FACT-FINDING
Date: Feb 17, 2001 (5 days)
Expense: $8,408.27
source

Traveler: Maurice Hinchey (from the office of Maurice Hinchey)
Destination: MIDDLE EAST
Purpose: MEETINGS WITH HEADS OF STATE
Date: May 26, 2001 (9 days)
Expense: $11,288.59
source

Traveler: Gary Ackerman (from the office of Gary Ackerman)
Destination: LONDON - DAMASCUS - TEL AVIV - JERUSALEM - AMMAN - JEDDAH - CAIRO - TEL AVIV
Purpose: FACT FINDING
Date: Aug 7, 2001 (10 days)
Expense: $15,837.78
source

Traveler: Howard Diamond (from the office of Gary Ackerman)
Destination: SYRIA, SAUDI ARABIA, EGYPT, ISRAEL
Purpose: FACT FINDING
Date: Aug 7, 2001 (10 days)
Expense: $4,703.17
source

Traveler: Robert Wexler (from the office of Robert Wexler)
Destination: SAUDI ARABIA; BAHRAIN
Purpose: FACT-FINDING
Date: Oct 4, 2001 (3 days)
Expense: $10,517.17
source

Traveler: Darrell Issa (from the office of Darrell Issa)
Destination: BEIRUT
Purpose: TO PROMOTE SUPPORT FOR THE WAR ON TERRORISM
Date: Oct 5, 2001 (5 days)
Expense: $10,892.42
source

Traveler: Robert Wexler (from the office of Robert Wexler)
Destination: TEL AVIV
Purpose: FACT-FINDING
Date: Nov 25, 2001 (4 days)
Expense: $8,419.05
source

Traveler: Richard Durbin (from the office of Richard Durbin)
Destination: NEW YORK TO MIDDLE EAST-TEL AVIV, BERLIN, LEBANON, SYRIA, ISRAEL
Purpose: FACT FINDING
Date: Jan 5, 2002 (7 days)
Expense: $6,284.60
source

Traveler: Jim Davis (from the office of Jim Davis)
Destination: MIDDLE EAST - LEBANON, ISRAEL, KUWAIT
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL DELEGATION FACT FINDING TRIP
Date: Jan 5, 2002 (9 days)
Expense: $9,270.82
source

Traveler: Adam Schiff (from the office of Adam Schiff)
Destination: MIDDLE EAST: EGYPT, SYRIA, LEBANON, JORDAN
Purpose: ENGAGE IN DIALOGUE WITH FOREIGN LEADERS
Date: Jan 5, 2002 (9 days)
Expense: $12,484.57
source

Traveler: David Price (from the office of David Price)
Destination: NY-MIDDLE EAST-KUWAIT-LEBANON, ISRAEL
Purpose: FACT-FINDING
Date: Jan 5, 2002 (7 days)
Expense: $10,827.92
source

Traveler: Joshua Rogin (from the office of Robert Wexler)
Destination: SAUDI ARABIA, JORDAN, ISRAEL
Purpose: FACT-FINDING-MEETINGS WITH GOV'T OFFICIALS
Date: Mar 3, 2002 (5 days)
Expense: $3,533.36
source

Traveler: Robert Wexler (from the office of Robert Wexler)
Destination: SAUDI ARABIA, JORDAN, ISRAEL
Purpose: FACT-FINDING-MEETINGS W/ GOVT. OFFICIALS
Date: Mar 3, 2002 (5 days)
Expense: $7,772.79
source

Traveler: David Price (from the office of David Price)
Destination: SYRIA - BEIRUT - TEL AVIV
Purpose: FACT-FINDING
Date: May 2, 2002 (6 days)
Expense: $8,826.75
source

Traveler: Robert Wexler (from the office of Robert Wexler)
Destination: SAUDI ARABIA, CAIRO, TEL AVIV
Purpose: FACT-FINDING; MTG W/ OFFICIALS
Date: Jun 28, 2002 (5 days)
Expense: $11,991.33
source

Traveler: Jim Davis (from the office of Jim Davis)
Destination: MIDDLE EAST-SYRIA, LEBANON, EGYPT, OMAN, QATAR, SAUDIA ARABIA, ISRAEL, PA
Purpose: CONGRESS AND DELEGATION FACT FINDING TRIP
Date: Dec 10, 2002 (8 days)
Expense: $10,281.35
source

Traveler: Eric Johnson (from the office of Robert Wexler)
Destination: SYRIA, JORDAN, ISRAEL
Purpose: FACT-FINDING
Date: May 30, 2003 (4 days)
Expense: $7,362.39
source



American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.