American RadioWorks |
Martin Luther King Jr. is jostled in Memphis as the march he's leading on March 28, 1968 turns violent. Photo courtesy University of Memphis Libraries.

King's Last March

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. Four decades later, King remains one of the most vivid symbols of hope for racial unity in America. But that's not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

Recent Posts

  • 01.22.15

    Free Community College for All

    President Barack Obama wants to make the first two years of community college free for what he calls “responsible students” who are “willing to work for it.” It’s being called “America’s College Promise.” This week on the podcast we examine the prospect of free community college for all.
  • 01.14.15

    What’s in a number?

    Our guest this week has a message for high school seniors and their parents who are poring over the latest college rankings lists: Put ‘em down.
  • 01.05.15

    Following the Money in Education Philanthropy

    Philanthropic foundations have been giving money to public education for years. But our guest this week argues that philanthropies are increasingly pushing specific educational agendas.
  • 12.23.14

    Who’s missing from the achievement gap debate?

    The achievement gap refers to the disparities in academic success between lower-income students of color and their more affluent white counterparts. But according to Quyen Dinh, executive director of the national advocacy organization Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC), one group often left out of the conversation is Southeast Asian American students.

American RadioWorks |
Martin Luther King Jr. is jostled in Memphis as the march he's leading on March 28, 1968 turns violent. Photo courtesy University of Memphis Libraries.

King's Last March

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. Four decades later, King remains one of the most vivid symbols of hope for racial unity in America. But that's not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

Recent Posts

  • 01.22.15

    Free Community College for All

    President Barack Obama wants to make the first two years of community college free for what he calls “responsible students” who are “willing to work for it.” It’s being called “America’s College Promise.” This week on the podcast we examine the prospect of free community college for all.
  • 01.14.15

    What’s in a number?

    Our guest this week has a message for high school seniors and their parents who are poring over the latest college rankings lists: Put ‘em down.
  • 01.05.15

    Following the Money in Education Philanthropy

    Philanthropic foundations have been giving money to public education for years. But our guest this week argues that philanthropies are increasingly pushing specific educational agendas.
  • 12.23.14

    Who’s missing from the achievement gap debate?

    The achievement gap refers to the disparities in academic success between lower-income students of color and their more affluent white counterparts. But according to Quyen Dinh, executive director of the national advocacy organization Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC), one group often left out of the conversation is Southeast Asian American students.

Back to The Data

Congresspersons and traveling staff for

Wisconsin

Senate

Russ Feingold

  • Russell Feingold
  • Farhana Khera

    Herbert Kohl

  • Seth Bloom
  • Paul Bock
  • Julie Cohen
  • Eileen Hattan Lynch
  • Brian Heindl
  • Philip Karsting
  • Jon Leibowitz
  • Eileen Lynch
  • Chad Metzler
  • Jeffrey Miller
  • Jonathan Schwantes
  • House

    Tammy Baldwin

  • William Murat
  • Stacy Stordahl

    Thomas Barrett

  • Ed Walz

    Mark Green

  • Kevin Allexon
  • Mark Graul
  • Elizabeth Morphy
  • Daniel Roehl
  • Amanda Schaumburg
  • Chris Tuttle
  • Chad Weininger

    Ron Kind

  • Mark Aumann
  • Cindy Brown
  • Elizabeth Dunford
  • Sherry Harper
  • Jeffrey Mazur
  • Erik Olson
  • Bradley Pfaff
  • Darin Schroeder
  • Matt Trebon

    Jerry Kleczka

  • Danielle Drissel

    Gwen Moore

  • Winfield Boerckel

    David Obey

  • Michelle Burkett
  • Paul Carver
  • Christina Hamilton
  • William Painter
  • David Sirota
  • Cheryl Smith
  • Melissa Vetterlund

    Thomas Petri

  • Tom Adair
  • David Anderson
  • Katie Birschbach
  • Debra Gebhardt
  • Sue Kerkman-Jung
  • Richard Markowitz
  • Patrick Mullane
  • Paul Trempe

    Paul Ryan

  • Leah Braesch
  • Peter Fotos
  • Joyce Meyer
  • Aimee Mikolajek
  • Cletus Willems

    F. James Sensenbrenner

  • Brandon Arnold
  • Mindy Barry
  • Barry Beringer
  • Thad Bingel
  • Gina Carty
  • Bradley Clanton
  • Kathleen Crooks
  • Christopher Cylke
  • Chris Delacy
  • Tiffany Enns
  • George Fishman
  • Cori Flam
  • Anthony Foxx
  • Michal Freedhoff
  • Joseph Gibson
  • Eunice Goldring
  • Jeff Grove
  • Sharon Hays
  • Rashad Hussain
  • Susan Jensen
  • Chris Katopis
  • Matthew Keeley
  • Phil Kiko
  • Karen Kimball
  • Michael Lenn
  • Jeffrey Lungren
  • Melissa Mcdonald
  • Sean Mclaughlin
  • Blaine Merritt
  • Stephanie Moore
  • William Moschella
  • Richard Obermann
  • Robert Palmer
  • Stephen Pinkos
  • Michael Qucar
  • Debra Rose
  • Richard Russell
  • Samara Ryder
  • Thomas Schreibel
  • Todd Schultz
  • Terry Shawn
  • Elizabeth Sokul
  • Diane Taylor
  • Paul Taylor
  • Robert Tracci
  • James Turner
  • Thomas Vanek
  • Harlan Watson
  • David Whitney
  • Ben Wu
  • Paul Zanowski
  • Brian Zimmer


  • American RadioWorks |
    Martin Luther King Jr. is jostled in Memphis as the march he's leading on March 28, 1968 turns violent. Photo courtesy University of Memphis Libraries.

    King's Last March

    Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. Four decades later, King remains one of the most vivid symbols of hope for racial unity in America. But that's not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

    Recent Posts

    • 01.22.15

      Free Community College for All

      President Barack Obama wants to make the first two years of community college free for what he calls “responsible students” who are “willing to work for it.” It’s being called “America’s College Promise.” This week on the podcast we examine the prospect of free community college for all.
    • 01.14.15

      What’s in a number?

      Our guest this week has a message for high school seniors and their parents who are poring over the latest college rankings lists: Put ‘em down.
    • 01.05.15

      Following the Money in Education Philanthropy

      Philanthropic foundations have been giving money to public education for years. But our guest this week argues that philanthropies are increasingly pushing specific educational agendas.
    • 12.23.14

      Who’s missing from the achievement gap debate?

      The achievement gap refers to the disparities in academic success between lower-income students of color and their more affluent white counterparts. But according to Quyen Dinh, executive director of the national advocacy organization Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC), one group often left out of the conversation is Southeast Asian American students.