American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

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American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 11.17.14

    The Utility of a PhD

    Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
  • 11.12.14

    The Roosevelts as a political team

    Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: The Internet of the 1930s

    Some predicted radio would be a powerful force for democratizing information and spreading knowledge to a vast population previously separated by geography or income. But the new technology also raised anxieties.

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Congresspersons and traveling staff for

Wisconsin

Senate

Russ Feingold

  • Russell Feingold
  • Farhana Khera

    Herbert Kohl

  • Seth Bloom
  • Paul Bock
  • Julie Cohen
  • Eileen Hattan Lynch
  • Brian Heindl
  • Philip Karsting
  • Jon Leibowitz
  • Eileen Lynch
  • Chad Metzler
  • Jeffrey Miller
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  • House

    Tammy Baldwin

  • William Murat
  • Stacy Stordahl

    Thomas Barrett

  • Ed Walz

    Mark Green

  • Kevin Allexon
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    Ron Kind

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  • Jeffrey Mazur
  • Erik Olson
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    Jerry Kleczka

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    Gwen Moore

  • Winfield Boerckel

    David Obey

  • Michelle Burkett
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    Thomas Petri

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  • Richard Markowitz
  • Patrick Mullane
  • Paul Trempe

    Paul Ryan

  • Leah Braesch
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    F. James Sensenbrenner

  • Brandon Arnold
  • Mindy Barry
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  • Harlan Watson
  • David Whitney
  • Ben Wu
  • Paul Zanowski
  • Brian Zimmer


  • American RadioWorks |
    (Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

    The First Family of Radio

    When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

    Recent Posts

    • 11.17.14

      The Utility of a PhD

      Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
    • 11.10.14

      Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

      President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
    • 11.12.14

      The Roosevelts as a political team

      Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.
    • 11.10.14

      Radio: The Internet of the 1930s

      Some predicted radio would be a powerful force for democratizing information and spreading knowledge to a vast population previously separated by geography or income. But the new technology also raised anxieties.