American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 12.16.14

    Rising prices on the poorest

    In January 2014 nearly a hundred college presidents gathered at the White House for a summit on the rising cost of college. But data show that those same institutions have been raising their prices fastest for the poorest students than for wealthier ones. This week on the podcast, we talk to a reporter who has been following the rising college cost burden on poor families.
  • 12.08.14

    How Much Will College Cost My Family?

    In 2011 the federal government required colleges and universities to publish “net price calculators” on their web sites. These tools are supposed to help families figure out which colleges they can afford. The calculators take into account family income, number of kids in college, state of residency, and other factors. But they’re often hard to use and time-consuming. Our guest this week has made this process simpler and more accessible.
  • 12.01.14

    Bridging the “Middle Skills” Gap

    There’s a paradox in today’s job market: even though there are millions of people looking for work, employers say they can’t find enough qualified workers. That’s due to an abundance of what economists call “middle skills” jobs – jobs that require specialized training beyond high school, but not a four-year college degree.
  • 12.01.14

    Commentary: Turning the tables on the vocational ed debate

    I’m not arguing that all education should be about acquiring job skills ... I’m saying that good vocational high schools have figured out how to bring college prep into their curriculum. And it’s time that traditional academic high schools brought more vocational education into theirs.

American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 12.16.14

    Rising prices on the poorest

    In January 2014 nearly a hundred college presidents gathered at the White House for a summit on the rising cost of college. But data show that those same institutions have been raising their prices fastest for the poorest students than for wealthier ones. This week on the podcast, we talk to a reporter who has been following the rising college cost burden on poor families.
  • 12.08.14

    How Much Will College Cost My Family?

    In 2011 the federal government required colleges and universities to publish “net price calculators” on their web sites. These tools are supposed to help families figure out which colleges they can afford. The calculators take into account family income, number of kids in college, state of residency, and other factors. But they’re often hard to use and time-consuming. Our guest this week has made this process simpler and more accessible.
  • 12.01.14

    Bridging the “Middle Skills” Gap

    There’s a paradox in today’s job market: even though there are millions of people looking for work, employers say they can’t find enough qualified workers. That’s due to an abundance of what economists call “middle skills” jobs – jobs that require specialized training beyond high school, but not a four-year college degree.
  • 12.01.14

    Commentary: Turning the tables on the vocational ed debate

    I’m not arguing that all education should be about acquiring job skills ... I’m saying that good vocational high schools have figured out how to bring college prep into their curriculum. And it’s time that traditional academic high schools brought more vocational education into theirs.

Back to The Data

Congresspersons and traveling staff for

Utah

Senate

Robert Bennett

  • Catharine Ackerson
  • Jennifer Belnap
  • James Brannon
  • Derek Brown
  • James Cobb
  • Mary Jane Collipriest
  • Fitchugh Elder
  • John Falls
  • Reed Garfield
  • Brian Higginbotham
  • Matt Hiller
  • Luke Johnson
  • Donald Marron
  • John Mcinerney
  • Tom Miller
  • Natasha Moore
  • Mark Morrison
  • Shaun Parkin
  • Kerk Phillips
  • Wendell Primus
  • Diane Rogers
  • Richard Rowdy Yeates
  • Kurt Schulet
  • Amber Sechrist
  • Tim Sheehan
  • Larry Shepherd
  • Chad Stone
  • William Triplett
  • Leah Uhlmann
  • Deborah Veres
  • Jeff Wrase
  • Paul Yost

    Orrin Hatch

  • Juliann Andreen
  • Bruce Artim
  • Shawn Bentley
  • David Best
  • Melanie Bowen
  • Jared Brown
  • Christopher Campbell
  • Susan Cobb
  • Kent Cook
  • Patricia Deloatche
  • Makan Delrahim
  • Robert Foreman
  • Tanya Green
  • Jace Johnson
  • David Jones
  • Garett Jones
  • Patricia Knight
  • Karen Lamontagne
  • Evan Liddiard
  • Paul Matulic
  • Lee Otis
  • Rita Redberg
  • Mathew Sandgren
  • Rebecca Seidel
  • Rebecca Shipp
  • Scott Simpson
  • Ryan Triplette
  • House

    Rob Bishop

  • Justin Harding

    Chris Cannon

  • Thad Bingel
  • Anne Cannon
  • Jenny Davis
  • Christopher Mackay
  • Corey Norman
  • Jane Rose
  • David Safavian
  • Todd Thorpe

    Merrill Cook

  • Connie Humphrey

    James Hansen

  • Cynthia Ahwinona
  • Jack Belcher
  • Harry Burroughs
  • William Condit
  • Christina Delmont
  • Jean Flemma
  • Nadina Gideon
  • Justin Harding
  • Richard Healy
  • Anne Heissenbuttel
  • Tod Hull
  • David Jansen
  • Joshua Johnson
  • William Johnson
  • Kaiiri Kaloi
  • Daisy Monter
  • Michael Olsen
  • Josh Penry
  • Jeffrey Petrich
  • John Rishel
  • Erica Rosenberg
  • Kathryn Seck
  • Daniel Simmons
  • Tim Stewart
  • David Watkins
  • David Whaley
  • Ben Winburn
  • Dong Yoder

    Jim Matheson

  • Stacey Alexander
  • Alene Bentley
  • Neeta Bidwai
  • Amy Boyle
  • Emily Merchant
  • Julie Slocum
  • Joshua Tzuker


  • American RadioWorks |
    (Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

    The First Family of Radio

    When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

    Recent Posts

    • 12.16.14

      Rising prices on the poorest

      In January 2014 nearly a hundred college presidents gathered at the White House for a summit on the rising cost of college. But data show that those same institutions have been raising their prices fastest for the poorest students than for wealthier ones. This week on the podcast, we talk to a reporter who has been following the rising college cost burden on poor families.
    • 12.08.14

      How Much Will College Cost My Family?

      In 2011 the federal government required colleges and universities to publish “net price calculators” on their web sites. These tools are supposed to help families figure out which colleges they can afford. The calculators take into account family income, number of kids in college, state of residency, and other factors. But they’re often hard to use and time-consuming. Our guest this week has made this process simpler and more accessible.
    • 12.01.14

      Bridging the “Middle Skills” Gap

      There’s a paradox in today’s job market: even though there are millions of people looking for work, employers say they can’t find enough qualified workers. That’s due to an abundance of what economists call “middle skills” jobs – jobs that require specialized training beyond high school, but not a four-year college degree.
    • 12.01.14

      Commentary: Turning the tables on the vocational ed debate

      I’m not arguing that all education should be about acquiring job skills ... I’m saying that good vocational high schools have figured out how to bring college prep into their curriculum. And it’s time that traditional academic high schools brought more vocational education into theirs.