American RadioWorks |
Image: Sweet Briar College web site

Sweet Briar Returns

Sweet Briar College was about to close after struggling with dwindling enrollment and other problems. An alumni group raised more than 20 million dollars in pledges to keep the doors open, but the school's survival is still deeply in doubt.

Recent Posts

  • 07.15.15

    The Future of Historically Black Colleges

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities proliferated throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when many white schools refused to admit African Americans, especially in the South. Our guest this week feels HBCUs still serve a crucial role in higher education.
  • 07.07.15

    Talking About Race in Schools

    Over the past year, race relations have dominated the news cycle. This can bring up difficult questions, especially for parents and teachers. Our guest Yolanda Moses says Americans need to find more ways to talk about race in schools.
  • 07.02.15

    Minorities and Special Ed

    For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.
  • 06.23.15

    Learning from Video Games

    A lot of parents worry about whether their kids' video game habits are harmful - especially when gaming gets in the way of homework or reading. But writer Greg Toppo says gaming can be a great way to learn.

American RadioWorks |
Image: Sweet Briar College web site

Sweet Briar Returns

Sweet Briar College was about to close after struggling with dwindling enrollment and other problems. An alumni group raised more than 20 million dollars in pledges to keep the doors open, but the school's survival is still deeply in doubt.

Recent Posts

  • 07.15.15

    The Future of Historically Black Colleges

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities proliferated throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when many white schools refused to admit African Americans, especially in the South. Our guest this week feels HBCUs still serve a crucial role in higher education.
  • 07.07.15

    Talking About Race in Schools

    Over the past year, race relations have dominated the news cycle. This can bring up difficult questions, especially for parents and teachers. Our guest Yolanda Moses says Americans need to find more ways to talk about race in schools.
  • 07.02.15

    Minorities and Special Ed

    For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.
  • 06.23.15

    Learning from Video Games

    A lot of parents worry about whether their kids' video game habits are harmful - especially when gaming gets in the way of homework or reading. But writer Greg Toppo says gaming can be a great way to learn.

Back to The Data

Congresspersons and traveling staff for

Utah

Senate

Robert Bennett

  • Catharine Ackerson
  • Jennifer Belnap
  • James Brannon
  • Derek Brown
  • James Cobb
  • Mary Jane Collipriest
  • Fitchugh Elder
  • John Falls
  • Reed Garfield
  • Brian Higginbotham
  • Matt Hiller
  • Luke Johnson
  • Donald Marron
  • John Mcinerney
  • Tom Miller
  • Natasha Moore
  • Mark Morrison
  • Shaun Parkin
  • Kerk Phillips
  • Wendell Primus
  • Diane Rogers
  • Richard Rowdy Yeates
  • Kurt Schulet
  • Amber Sechrist
  • Tim Sheehan
  • Larry Shepherd
  • Chad Stone
  • William Triplett
  • Leah Uhlmann
  • Deborah Veres
  • Jeff Wrase
  • Paul Yost

    Orrin Hatch

  • Juliann Andreen
  • Bruce Artim
  • Shawn Bentley
  • David Best
  • Melanie Bowen
  • Jared Brown
  • Christopher Campbell
  • Susan Cobb
  • Kent Cook
  • Patricia Deloatche
  • Makan Delrahim
  • Robert Foreman
  • Tanya Green
  • Jace Johnson
  • David Jones
  • Garett Jones
  • Patricia Knight
  • Karen Lamontagne
  • Evan Liddiard
  • Paul Matulic
  • Lee Otis
  • Rita Redberg
  • Mathew Sandgren
  • Rebecca Seidel
  • Rebecca Shipp
  • Scott Simpson
  • Ryan Triplette
  • House

    Rob Bishop

  • Justin Harding

    Chris Cannon

  • Thad Bingel
  • Anne Cannon
  • Jenny Davis
  • Christopher Mackay
  • Corey Norman
  • Jane Rose
  • David Safavian
  • Todd Thorpe

    Merrill Cook

  • Connie Humphrey

    James Hansen

  • Cynthia Ahwinona
  • Jack Belcher
  • Harry Burroughs
  • William Condit
  • Christina Delmont
  • Jean Flemma
  • Nadina Gideon
  • Justin Harding
  • Richard Healy
  • Anne Heissenbuttel
  • Tod Hull
  • David Jansen
  • Joshua Johnson
  • William Johnson
  • Kaiiri Kaloi
  • Daisy Monter
  • Michael Olsen
  • Josh Penry
  • Jeffrey Petrich
  • John Rishel
  • Erica Rosenberg
  • Kathryn Seck
  • Daniel Simmons
  • Tim Stewart
  • David Watkins
  • David Whaley
  • Ben Winburn
  • Dong Yoder

    Jim Matheson

  • Stacey Alexander
  • Alene Bentley
  • Neeta Bidwai
  • Amy Boyle
  • Emily Merchant
  • Julie Slocum
  • Joshua Tzuker


  • American RadioWorks |
    Image: Sweet Briar College web site

    Sweet Briar Returns

    Sweet Briar College was about to close after struggling with dwindling enrollment and other problems. An alumni group raised more than 20 million dollars in pledges to keep the doors open, but the school's survival is still deeply in doubt.

    Recent Posts

    • 07.15.15

      The Future of Historically Black Colleges

      Historically Black Colleges and Universities proliferated throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when many white schools refused to admit African Americans, especially in the South. Our guest this week feels HBCUs still serve a crucial role in higher education.
    • 07.07.15

      Talking About Race in Schools

      Over the past year, race relations have dominated the news cycle. This can bring up difficult questions, especially for parents and teachers. Our guest Yolanda Moses says Americans need to find more ways to talk about race in schools.
    • 07.02.15

      Minorities and Special Ed

      For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.
    • 06.23.15

      Learning from Video Games

      A lot of parents worry about whether their kids' video game habits are harmful - especially when gaming gets in the way of homework or reading. But writer Greg Toppo says gaming can be a great way to learn.