American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

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    Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

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American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 11.17.14

    The Utility of a PhD

    Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
  • 11.12.14

    The Roosevelts as a political team

    Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: The Internet of the 1930s

    Some predicted radio would be a powerful force for democratizing information and spreading knowledge to a vast population previously separated by geography or income. But the new technology also raised anxieties.

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Congresspersons and traveling staff for

South Dakota

Senate

Thomas Daschle

  • Josh Ackil
  • Jonathan Adelstein
  • Joan Huffer
  • Evan Johesman
  • Mark Lippert
  • Jeffrey Mitchell
  • Sheila Murphy
  • Eric Olsen
  • Eric Olson
  • Mark Patterson
  • Daniel Pfeiffer
  • Sean Richardson
  • Joe Trahern
  • Peter Umhofer
  • Zabrae Valentine
  • Brad Van Dam

    Tim Johnson

  • Mara Baer
  • Cynthia Bartel
  • Patrick Benton
  • Sharon Boysen
  • Naomi Camper
  • Elizabeth Canter
  • Sonja Dean
  • Dwight Fettig
  • Susan Hansen
  • Adam Healy
  • Meredith Hughes
  • Danna Jackson
  • Ian Marquardt
  • Kenneth Martin
  • Paul Nash
  • Alfred Samuelson
  • Drey Samuelson
  • Frank Scamlon
  • Mitchell Stewart
  • Todd Stubbendieck
  • Matthew Thomblad
  • David Toomey
  • Elli Wicks
  • Esther Zoss
  • House

    Stephanie Herseth

    William Janklow

  • Rachel Hansen
  • Danita Murray

    John Thune

  • Sara Hagedorn
  • Jennifer Hayes
  • Herbert Jones
  • Jafar Karim
  • Sandy Massey
  • Joshua Shields
  • Jennifer Thompson
  • Mollie Zito


  • American RadioWorks |
    (Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

    The First Family of Radio

    When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

    Recent Posts

    • 11.17.14

      The Utility of a PhD

      Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
    • 11.10.14

      Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

      President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
    • 11.12.14

      The Roosevelts as a political team

      Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.
    • 11.10.14

      Radio: The Internet of the 1930s

      Some predicted radio would be a powerful force for democratizing information and spreading knowledge to a vast population previously separated by geography or income. But the new technology also raised anxieties.