American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 12.16.14

    Rising prices on the poorest

    In January 2014 nearly a hundred college presidents gathered at the White House for a summit on the rising cost of college. But data show that those same institutions have been raising their prices fastest for the poorest students than for wealthier ones. This week on the podcast, we talk to a reporter who has been following the rising college cost burden on poor families.
  • 12.08.14

    How Much Will College Cost My Family?

    In 2011 the federal government required colleges and universities to publish “net price calculators” on their web sites. These tools are supposed to help families figure out which colleges they can afford. The calculators take into account family income, number of kids in college, state of residency, and other factors. But they’re often hard to use and time-consuming. Our guest this week has made this process simpler and more accessible.
  • 12.01.14

    Bridging the “Middle Skills” Gap

    There’s a paradox in today’s job market: even though there are millions of people looking for work, employers say they can’t find enough qualified workers. That’s due to an abundance of what economists call “middle skills” jobs – jobs that require specialized training beyond high school, but not a four-year college degree.
  • 12.01.14

    Commentary: Turning the tables on the vocational ed debate

    I’m not arguing that all education should be about acquiring job skills ... I’m saying that good vocational high schools have figured out how to bring college prep into their curriculum. And it’s time that traditional academic high schools brought more vocational education into theirs.

American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 12.16.14

    Rising prices on the poorest

    In January 2014 nearly a hundred college presidents gathered at the White House for a summit on the rising cost of college. But data show that those same institutions have been raising their prices fastest for the poorest students than for wealthier ones. This week on the podcast, we talk to a reporter who has been following the rising college cost burden on poor families.
  • 12.08.14

    How Much Will College Cost My Family?

    In 2011 the federal government required colleges and universities to publish “net price calculators” on their web sites. These tools are supposed to help families figure out which colleges they can afford. The calculators take into account family income, number of kids in college, state of residency, and other factors. But they’re often hard to use and time-consuming. Our guest this week has made this process simpler and more accessible.
  • 12.01.14

    Bridging the “Middle Skills” Gap

    There’s a paradox in today’s job market: even though there are millions of people looking for work, employers say they can’t find enough qualified workers. That’s due to an abundance of what economists call “middle skills” jobs – jobs that require specialized training beyond high school, but not a four-year college degree.
  • 12.01.14

    Commentary: Turning the tables on the vocational ed debate

    I’m not arguing that all education should be about acquiring job skills ... I’m saying that good vocational high schools have figured out how to bring college prep into their curriculum. And it’s time that traditional academic high schools brought more vocational education into theirs.

Back to The Data

Congresspersons and traveling staff for

South Carolina

Senate

Ernest Hollings

  • Ashley Cooper
  • Bridget Ferriss
  • Amy Fraenkel
  • Alford Haselden
  • Dabney Hegg
  • Joab Lesesne
  • Chan Lieu
  • Brian Nagle
  • Julian Norment
  • Aisha Pearson
  • Danielle Renart
  • Toby Short
  • Sam Whitehorn

    Strom Thurmond

  • David Best
  • Ernie Coggins
  • Genevieve Erny
  • James Hippe
  • Garry Malphrus
  • Arthur Rynearson
  • William Tuten
  • House

    J. Gresham Barrett

  • Susan Aiken
  • David Black
  • Darryl Broome
  • Sandra Campbell
  • James Miller
  • Jay Ragley
  • Darrell Scott
  • Greg Thomas
  • William Williams

    Henry Brown

  • Michael Burchstead
  • Stephen Flippin
  • Joe Glebocki
  • W Stovall Witte

    James Clyburn

  • Kenny Barnes
  • Sarah Birch
  • Jennie Chaplin
  • Michele Dash
  • Hope Derrick
  • Michael Elazier
  • Jaime Harrison
  • Charlene Lowery
  • Davis Marshall
  • Andrea Martin
  • Robert Nance
  • Acacia Salatti
  • Barvetta Singletary
  • Carole Smith
  • Dalton Tresuant
  • Yelberton Watkins
  • Isaac Williams

    Jim Demint

  • Susan Beals
  • David Gladden
  • John Long
  • Nina Owcharenko
  • Haliburton Rigby
  • Charles Royal
  • Chris Socha
  • Lesley Turner
  • A Weise
  • Marie Wheat
  • Jacqueline Wood

    Lindsey Graham

  • Denise Bauld
  • Laura Bauld
  • Ed Bonapfel
  • Ellen Bradley
  • Thomas Burris
  • Michael Conschafter
  • Charles Durkin
  • Jessica Efird
  • Stephen Flippin
  • Aleix Jarvis
  • Stephanie Kaufmann
  • Andrew King
  • Jennifer Olson
  • Richard Perry
  • Matthew Rimkunas
  • Rene Tewkesbury

    Bob Inglis

    Mark Sanford

  • James Gibadlo
  • Jessica Gonzales

    Floyd Spence

  • Rachael Bowman
  • Craig Metz
  • Peter Pry
  • Steven Thompson
  • Miriam Wolff

    John Spratt

  • Rudy Barnes
  • Jennifer Friedman
  • Joseph Harris
  • Robert Hopkins
  • Thomas Kahn
  • Michael Lieberman
  • Michael Mccord
  • Nicholas Miller
  • Dawn Myers
  • Jonathan Orr
  • Kimberly Overbeck
  • Antonio Santalucia
  • Daraka Satcher
  • Ashli Scott

    Joe Wilson

  • Eric Dell
  • Jessica Eggimann
  • Laurin Groover
  • Micki Howard
  • Michael Rentiers
  • Sandeep Teppara
  • Micki Work


  • American RadioWorks |
    (Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

    The First Family of Radio

    When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

    Recent Posts

    • 12.16.14

      Rising prices on the poorest

      In January 2014 nearly a hundred college presidents gathered at the White House for a summit on the rising cost of college. But data show that those same institutions have been raising their prices fastest for the poorest students than for wealthier ones. This week on the podcast, we talk to a reporter who has been following the rising college cost burden on poor families.
    • 12.08.14

      How Much Will College Cost My Family?

      In 2011 the federal government required colleges and universities to publish “net price calculators” on their web sites. These tools are supposed to help families figure out which colleges they can afford. The calculators take into account family income, number of kids in college, state of residency, and other factors. But they’re often hard to use and time-consuming. Our guest this week has made this process simpler and more accessible.
    • 12.01.14

      Bridging the “Middle Skills” Gap

      There’s a paradox in today’s job market: even though there are millions of people looking for work, employers say they can’t find enough qualified workers. That’s due to an abundance of what economists call “middle skills” jobs – jobs that require specialized training beyond high school, but not a four-year college degree.
    • 12.01.14

      Commentary: Turning the tables on the vocational ed debate

      I’m not arguing that all education should be about acquiring job skills ... I’m saying that good vocational high schools have figured out how to bring college prep into their curriculum. And it’s time that traditional academic high schools brought more vocational education into theirs.