American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

Back to The Data

Congresspersons and traveling staff for

South Carolina

Senate

Ernest Hollings

  • Ashley Cooper
  • Bridget Ferriss
  • Amy Fraenkel
  • Alford Haselden
  • Dabney Hegg
  • Joab Lesesne
  • Chan Lieu
  • Brian Nagle
  • Julian Norment
  • Aisha Pearson
  • Danielle Renart
  • Toby Short
  • Sam Whitehorn

    Strom Thurmond

  • David Best
  • Ernie Coggins
  • Genevieve Erny
  • James Hippe
  • Garry Malphrus
  • Arthur Rynearson
  • William Tuten
  • House

    J. Gresham Barrett

  • Susan Aiken
  • David Black
  • Darryl Broome
  • Sandra Campbell
  • James Miller
  • Jay Ragley
  • Darrell Scott
  • Greg Thomas
  • William Williams

    Henry Brown

  • Michael Burchstead
  • Stephen Flippin
  • Joe Glebocki
  • W Stovall Witte

    James Clyburn

  • Kenny Barnes
  • Sarah Birch
  • Jennie Chaplin
  • Michele Dash
  • Hope Derrick
  • Michael Elazier
  • Jaime Harrison
  • Charlene Lowery
  • Davis Marshall
  • Andrea Martin
  • Robert Nance
  • Acacia Salatti
  • Barvetta Singletary
  • Carole Smith
  • Dalton Tresuant
  • Yelberton Watkins
  • Isaac Williams

    Jim Demint

  • Susan Beals
  • David Gladden
  • John Long
  • Nina Owcharenko
  • Haliburton Rigby
  • Charles Royal
  • Chris Socha
  • Lesley Turner
  • A Weise
  • Marie Wheat
  • Jacqueline Wood

    Lindsey Graham

  • Denise Bauld
  • Laura Bauld
  • Ed Bonapfel
  • Ellen Bradley
  • Thomas Burris
  • Michael Conschafter
  • Charles Durkin
  • Jessica Efird
  • Stephen Flippin
  • Aleix Jarvis
  • Stephanie Kaufmann
  • Andrew King
  • Jennifer Olson
  • Richard Perry
  • Matthew Rimkunas
  • Rene Tewkesbury

    Bob Inglis

    Mark Sanford

  • James Gibadlo
  • Jessica Gonzales

    Floyd Spence

  • Rachael Bowman
  • Craig Metz
  • Peter Pry
  • Steven Thompson
  • Miriam Wolff

    John Spratt

  • Rudy Barnes
  • Jennifer Friedman
  • Joseph Harris
  • Robert Hopkins
  • Thomas Kahn
  • Michael Lieberman
  • Michael Mccord
  • Nicholas Miller
  • Dawn Myers
  • Jonathan Orr
  • Kimberly Overbeck
  • Antonio Santalucia
  • Daraka Satcher
  • Ashli Scott

    Joe Wilson

  • Eric Dell
  • Jessica Eggimann
  • Laurin Groover
  • Micki Howard
  • Michael Rentiers
  • Sandeep Teppara
  • Micki Work


  • American RadioWorks |
    teaching-teachers

    Teaching Teachers

    Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

    Recent Posts

    • 08.27.15

      Rethinking teacher preparation

      In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
    • 08.27.15

      An American way of teaching

      In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
    • 08.27.15

      Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

      "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball
    • 08.27.15

      A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

      In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.