American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

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    Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
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American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 11.17.14

    The Utility of a PhD

    Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
  • 11.12.14

    The Roosevelts as a political team

    Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: The Internet of the 1930s

    Some predicted radio would be a powerful force for democratizing information and spreading knowledge to a vast population previously separated by geography or income. But the new technology also raised anxieties.

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Congresspersons and traveling staff for

Oklahoma

Senate

James Inhofe

  • Dan Barron
  • Richard Blackwood
  • John Bonsell
  • John Collison
  • Genevieve Erny
  • Michael Ference
  • Ragon Gentry
  • Martin Hall
  • Aloysius Hogan
  • Cynthia Janssen
  • Suzanne Matwyshen-Gillen
  • Mike Murray
  • James O'keeffe
  • Louis Renjel
  • Nathan Richmond
  • Greg Schildwachter
  • John Shanahan
  • Ellen Stein
  • Caroline Swift
  • Ruth Van Mark
  • Cynthia Vukmer
  • Julie Wareing
  • Michael Whatley
  • Andrew Wheeler

    Don Nickles

  • Derek Albro
  • Amy Angelier
  • Kathryn Barr
  • W Bret Bernhardt
  • Daniel Brandt
  • Daniel Branelt
  • Cara Duckworth
  • Katherine Gumerson
  • Stacey Harley
  • Megan Hauck
  • Rachel Hensler
  • Jody Hernandez
  • Don Kent
  • Matthew Kirk
  • Chan Klingensmith
  • J Mclane Layton
  • Stacey Lowder
  • Hazen Marshall
  • Marlo Meuli
  • Diane Moery
  • Stephen Moffitt
  • Lee Morris
  • Aaron Mullins
  • Maureen O'neill
  • Michael Osburn
  • K Gayle Osterberg
  • Anne Oswalt
  • David Pappone
  • Roy Phillips
  • Jennifer Quinlan
  • Brook Simmons
  • Margaret Stewart
  • Eric Ueland
  • C Stewart Verdery
  • Binyamin Zomer
  • House

    Dan Boren

  • Karen Kuhlman

    Brad Carson

  • Chastity Bedonie
  • Amy Berg
  • Jeff Blackwood
  • Karen Campbell
  • Karen Kuhlman
  • Marguerite Mckinney
  • Keri Nash
  • Jessica Werner
  • Marc Young

    Tom Coburn

  • G T Bynum

    Tom Cole

  • Chris Arnold
  • Christopher Caron
  • Keri Dennis
  • Rob Johnson
  • Pete Kirkham
  • Scott Parman
  • Brad Watson

    Ernest Istook

  • John Albaugh
  • Kurt Conrad
  • William Duncan
  • Deborah Shelby
  • Micah Swatford
  • Devery Youngblood

    Steve Largent

  • Terry Allen
  • Bob Bolster
  • Cameron Doolittle
  • Andrew Halataei
  • Elizabeth Stewart

    Frank Lucas

  • Richard Blackwood
  • Stacey Glasscock
  • Marna Harris
  • James Luetkemeyer
  • Anthony Marlatt
  • Nicole Scott
  • David Thompson
  • Ryan Weston
  • Micah Zomer

    John Sullivan

  • Blake Ashbee
  • Elizabeth Bartheld
  • Wendy Der
  • Thomas Duncan
  • John Rambolt

    Wes Watkins

  • Aaron Carlson
  • Robert Smith
  • Jeffery Stromberg

    J.C. Watts

  • John Destefano
  • Courtney Haller
  • John Horner
  • Jennifer Lord
  • Greg Mccarthy
  • Joshua Mcclintock
  • Christopher Perrin
  • Pamela Pryor
  • Kevin Schweers
  • Brendon Shields
  • James Smith
  • Jon Vanden Heuvel
  • Jon Vandenheuvel
  • W Stovall Witte


  • American RadioWorks |
    (Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

    The First Family of Radio

    When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

    Recent Posts

    • 11.17.14

      The Utility of a PhD

      Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
    • 11.10.14

      Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

      President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
    • 11.12.14

      The Roosevelts as a political team

      Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.
    • 11.10.14

      Radio: The Internet of the 1930s

      Some predicted radio would be a powerful force for democratizing information and spreading knowledge to a vast population previously separated by geography or income. But the new technology also raised anxieties.