American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

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American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 11.17.14

    The Utility of a PhD

    Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
  • 11.12.14

    The Roosevelts as a political team

    Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: The Internet of the 1930s

    Some predicted radio would be a powerful force for democratizing information and spreading knowledge to a vast population previously separated by geography or income. But the new technology also raised anxieties.

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Congresspersons and traveling staff for

Nevada

Senate

Richard Bryan

  • Brent Heberlee

    John Ensign

  • Allison Barry
  • J Scott Bensing
  • Shellyn Camacho
  • Aaron Cohen
  • Bryan Cunningham
  • Gina Grandinetti
  • Eli Greif
  • D'arcy Grisier
  • Julene Haworth
  • Christopher Jaarda
  • Lauren Jiles
  • Kevin Kirkeby
  • Valerie Largent
  • John Lopez
  • Michelle Spence
  • Michael Sullivan
  • Pamela Thiessen
  • Jesse Wadhams

    Harry Reid

  • Kai Anderson
  • Peter Arapis
  • Edward Ayoob
  • Leslie Brown
  • Sabrina De Santiago
  • Robert Griffiths
  • Robert Herbert
  • Serena Hoy
  • Gregory Jaczko
  • Kevin Kayes
  • Liane Lee
  • Sam Lieberman
  • Tamara Mayberry
  • Susan Mccue
  • Margaret Mcglinch
  • Christopher Miller
  • Elisa Montoya
  • Gary Myrick
  • James Ryan
  • Dana Singiser
  • Carolyn Slutsker
  • Brooks Stratmore
  • Anita Sullivan
  • Paul Thomsen
  • Mark Wetjen
  • Andrew Willison
  • Peter Windkur
  • House

    Shelley Berkley

  • Maria Castillo
  • Judith Fleischman
  • Cary Gibson
  • Matthew Horowitz
  • Tod Story
  • Heather Urban
  • Richard Urey

    James Gibbons

  • Sandra Keil
  • Cory Kennedy
  • Margaret Mcelray
  • Amy Spanbauer
  • Jack Victory

    Jon Porter

  • Allison Barry
  • Jody Garner
  • Trevor Kolego
  • Craig Nersesian


  • American RadioWorks |
    (Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

    The First Family of Radio

    When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

    Recent Posts

    • 11.17.14

      The Utility of a PhD

      Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
    • 11.10.14

      Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

      President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
    • 11.12.14

      The Roosevelts as a political team

      Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.
    • 11.10.14

      Radio: The Internet of the 1930s

      Some predicted radio would be a powerful force for democratizing information and spreading knowledge to a vast population previously separated by geography or income. But the new technology also raised anxieties.