American RadioWorks |
Martin Luther King Jr. is jostled in Memphis as the march he's leading on March 28, 1968 turns violent. Photo courtesy University of Memphis Libraries.

King's Last March

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. Four decades later, King remains one of the most vivid symbols of hope for racial unity in America. But that's not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

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American RadioWorks |
Martin Luther King Jr. is jostled in Memphis as the march he's leading on March 28, 1968 turns violent. Photo courtesy University of Memphis Libraries.

King's Last March

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. Four decades later, King remains one of the most vivid symbols of hope for racial unity in America. But that's not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

Recent Posts

  • 01.22.15

    Free Community College for All

    President Barack Obama wants to make the first two years of community college free for what he calls “responsible students” who are “willing to work for it.” It’s being called “America’s College Promise.” This week on the podcast we examine the prospect of free community college for all.
  • 01.14.15

    What’s in a number?

    Our guest this week has a message for high school seniors and their parents who are poring over the latest college rankings lists: Put ‘em down.
  • 01.05.15

    Following the Money in Education Philanthropy

    Philanthropic foundations have been giving money to public education for years. But our guest this week argues that philanthropies are increasingly pushing specific educational agendas.
  • 12.23.14

    Who’s missing from the achievement gap debate?

    The achievement gap refers to the disparities in academic success between lower-income students of color and their more affluent white counterparts. But according to Quyen Dinh, executive director of the national advocacy organization Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC), one group often left out of the conversation is Southeast Asian American students.

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Congresspersons and traveling staff for

Nevada

Senate

Richard Bryan

  • Brent Heberlee

    John Ensign

  • Allison Barry
  • J Scott Bensing
  • Shellyn Camacho
  • Aaron Cohen
  • Bryan Cunningham
  • Gina Grandinetti
  • Eli Greif
  • D'arcy Grisier
  • Julene Haworth
  • Christopher Jaarda
  • Lauren Jiles
  • Kevin Kirkeby
  • Valerie Largent
  • John Lopez
  • Michelle Spence
  • Michael Sullivan
  • Pamela Thiessen
  • Jesse Wadhams

    Harry Reid

  • Kai Anderson
  • Peter Arapis
  • Edward Ayoob
  • Leslie Brown
  • Sabrina De Santiago
  • Robert Griffiths
  • Robert Herbert
  • Serena Hoy
  • Gregory Jaczko
  • Kevin Kayes
  • Liane Lee
  • Sam Lieberman
  • Tamara Mayberry
  • Susan Mccue
  • Margaret Mcglinch
  • Christopher Miller
  • Elisa Montoya
  • Gary Myrick
  • James Ryan
  • Dana Singiser
  • Carolyn Slutsker
  • Brooks Stratmore
  • Anita Sullivan
  • Paul Thomsen
  • Mark Wetjen
  • Andrew Willison
  • Peter Windkur
  • House

    Shelley Berkley

  • Maria Castillo
  • Judith Fleischman
  • Cary Gibson
  • Matthew Horowitz
  • Tod Story
  • Heather Urban
  • Richard Urey

    James Gibbons

  • Sandra Keil
  • Cory Kennedy
  • Margaret Mcelray
  • Amy Spanbauer
  • Jack Victory

    Jon Porter

  • Allison Barry
  • Jody Garner
  • Trevor Kolego
  • Craig Nersesian


  • American RadioWorks |
    Martin Luther King Jr. is jostled in Memphis as the march he's leading on March 28, 1968 turns violent. Photo courtesy University of Memphis Libraries.

    King's Last March

    Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. Four decades later, King remains one of the most vivid symbols of hope for racial unity in America. But that's not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

    Recent Posts

    • 01.22.15

      Free Community College for All

      President Barack Obama wants to make the first two years of community college free for what he calls “responsible students” who are “willing to work for it.” It’s being called “America’s College Promise.” This week on the podcast we examine the prospect of free community college for all.
    • 01.14.15

      What’s in a number?

      Our guest this week has a message for high school seniors and their parents who are poring over the latest college rankings lists: Put ‘em down.
    • 01.05.15

      Following the Money in Education Philanthropy

      Philanthropic foundations have been giving money to public education for years. But our guest this week argues that philanthropies are increasingly pushing specific educational agendas.
    • 12.23.14

      Who’s missing from the achievement gap debate?

      The achievement gap refers to the disparities in academic success between lower-income students of color and their more affluent white counterparts. But according to Quyen Dinh, executive director of the national advocacy organization Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC), one group often left out of the conversation is Southeast Asian American students.