American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball

American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball

Back to The Data

Congresspersons and traveling staff for

New Mexico

Senate

Jeff Bingaman

  • James Dennis
  • Jonathan Epstein
  • Deborah Estes
  • Kira Finkler
  • Amanda Goldman
  • Angelo Gonzales
  • Todd Haiken
  • Carmel Martin
  • Jennifer Michael
  • David Montoya
  • Malini Sekhar
  • Randall Soderquist
  • Randall Suderquist
  • Vicki Thorne
  • Bill Wicker

    Pete Domenici

  • Daniel Brandt
  • Christopher Collins
  • Allen Cutler
  • Kellie Donnelly
  • Lisa Epifani
  • Beth Felder
  • Alex Flint
  • Marnie Funk
  • Ryan Gleason
  • James Hearn
  • Edward Hild
  • G William Hoagland
  • Bernadette Kilroy
  • Peter Lyons
  • Sabre Mayhugh
  • David Myers
  • Mieko Nakabayashi
  • Kelly Neville
  • John Peschke
  • Roy Phillips
  • Denise Ramor
  • Shelly Randel
  • Joaquin Sanchez
  • Robert Stevenson
  • Margaret Stewart
  • Clint Taylor
  • Cheryle Tucker
  • Elizabeth Turpen
  • Shelly Vaugh-Randel
  • Kathleen Weldon
  • Winslow Wheeler
  • Gary Ziehe
  • House

    Steve Pearce

  • Ricardo Bernal
  • James Richards
  • Rhett Skiles

    Joe Skeen

  • Suzanne Eisold
  • James Hughes
  • James Richards

    Tom Udall

  • Sarah Cobb
  • Michael Collins
  • Cynthia Cook
  • Carlos Fierro
  • Johanna Polsenberg
  • Pete Valencia
  • Robert Vasquez

    Heather Wilson

  • Bryce Dustman
  • Enrique Knell
  • Joseph Moser
  • Dawn Petchell
  • Luke Rose
  • Lynnea Shane


  • American RadioWorks |
    teaching-teachers

    Teaching Teachers

    Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

    Recent Posts

    • 08.27.15

      An American way of teaching

      In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
    • 08.27.15

      Rethinking teacher preparation

      In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
    • 08.27.15

      A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

      In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.
    • 08.27.15

      Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

      "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball