American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

Recent Posts

  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.

American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

Recent Posts

  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.

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Congresspersons and traveling staff for

New Jersey

Senate

Jon Corzine

  • Simon Brandler
  • Sandra Caron
  • Brian Chernoff
  • Mike Gayle
  • Sandra George
  • Heather Howard
  • Anne Hubert
  • Grace Kim
  • Keith Roachford

    Frank Lautenberg

  • Cynthia Bethell
  • Rudy Brioche
  • Jana Davis
  • Dafna Hochman
  • Robert Kenney
  • Rebecca Mandell
  • David Matsuda
  • Doug Mehan
  • Mitch Warren
  • Tim Yehl

    Robert Torricelli

  • John Bradshaw
  • Abraham Elmazahi
  • Adam Herbsman
  • Kyle Mulroy
  • Adam Phelps
  • Alexis Schuler
  • Eric Shuffler
  • Troy Stanjavore
  • Michael Szyman
  • Lona Valmoro
  • House

    Robert Andrews

  • Carlos Fenwick

    Michael Ferguson

  • Alex Delpizzo
  • Thomas Fussaro
  • James Kelly
  • Jacqueline Moran
  • Greg Orlando
  • Brendan Reilly

    Robert Franks

    Rodney Frelinghuysen

  • Nancy Fox
  • Ed Krenik
  • Donna Mullins

    Scott Garrett

  • Gina Diorio
  • Jason Fahrer
  • Evan Kozlow
  • Jacqueline Moran
  • Chris Russell

    Rush Holt

  • Mark Dedrick
  • Matthew Dennis
  • Bill Goold
  • Mark Matzen
  • Michelle Mulder
  • Jennifer Surovy

    Frank Lobiondo

  • Kristen Campbell
  • Joan Dermanoski
  • Geoff Gosselin
  • Dana Richter

    Robert Menendez

  • Amitabha Bose
  • James Datri
  • Steven Feldgus
  • Michael Hutton
  • Andrew Kauders
  • Jessica Lewis
  • Kay Licausi
  • Lauren Lyons
  • Maria Meier
  • Karissa Willhite

    Frank Pallone

  • Jennifer Cannata
  • Jeffrey Carroll
  • Robert Clark
  • Eric Gordon
  • Kathy Kulkarni
  • Jessica Lenard
  • Raffi Vartian
  • Tim Yehl
  • Heather Zichal

    William Pascrell

  • Charla Penn
  • Susan Quatrone
  • Benjamin Rich

    Donald Payne

  • Laverne Alexander
  • Isabel Cruz
  • Alexandrine De Bianchi
  • Alexandrine Debianchi
  • Charisse Glassman
  • Noelle Lusane
  • Noelle Lusone
  • Kerry Mckenney
  • Joseph Richburg
  • Amanda Rowan
  • Amiri Settles
  • Jonita Whitaker

    Steven Rothman

  • Kevin Brady
  • Kelly Dougherty
  • Raffi Hamparian
  • Amanda Koman
  • Phil Putter
  • Ann Russo
  • Brooke Sharkey
  • Shelly Stoneman
  • Charles Young
  • Rob Zucker

    Marge Roukema

  • Carolee Lowry

    Jim Saxton

  • Jason Blazakis
  • Elise Kenderian
  • Erica Stocker

    Christopher Smith

  • Kathleen Anderson
  • Kathleen Conaway
  • John Cusey
  • Steven Kirkland
  • David Kush
  • Eleanor Nagy
  • Andrew Napoli
  • George Phillips
  • Lindsey Plumley
  • Kristie Rodgers
  • Patrick Ryan
  • Kingston Smith


  • American RadioWorks |
    Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

    Can how you move change how you think?

    Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

    Recent Posts

    • 05.12.15

      Forest Schools

      What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
    • 05.06.15

      Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

      There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
    • 04.29.15

      Green Teachers

      A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
    • 04.22.15

      The First Gen Movement

      Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.